Radioactive: A Conversation between Lauren Redniss and Harold Varmus

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Rivka Galchen Rivka Galchen
American Innovations American Innovations
Karen Russell by Michael Lionstar Karen Russell by Michael Lionstar

American Stories: Rivka Galchen and Karen Russell

Tuesday, June 3, 2014, 7 - 9 p.m.
The fiction writers Rivka Galchen and Karen Russell, whose most recent book is Vampires in the Lemon Grove, talk about Galchen's new collection of stories, American Innovations.
 
Camilo Vergara Camilo Vergara
Harlem: The Unmaking of a Ghetto Harlem: The Unmaking of a Ghetto
Record Shop, Harlem. By Camilo Vergara Record Shop, Harlem. By Camilo Vergara
Graciela Mochkofsky Graciela Mochkofsky

The Changing Face of Harlem: Camilo Vergara and Graciela Mochkofsky

Tuesday, April 22, 2014, 7 - 9 p.m.

Click here to reserve your free seats!

Camilo Vergara and the journalist Graciela Mochkofsky talk about Harlem in light of Vergara's latest book, Harlem: The Unmaking of a Ghetto, a photographic chronicle of transformations in America's most famous African-American neighborhood.

James Romm James Romm
Dying Every Day Dying Every Day
Jim Shaprio, by Mary Cregan Jim Shaprio, by Mary Cregan

"Dying Every Day: Seneca at the Court of Nero" -- James Romm and Jim Shapiro

Tuesday, March 25, 2014, 7 - 9 p.m.

Click here to reserve your free seats!

James Romm and the Shakespeare scholar James Shapiro discuss the curious relationship between the sage Seneca and the despot Nero in the years between 50 and 68 AD, a period whose tumultuous events include the fire of Rome.

Hilton Als by Dominique Nabakov Hilton Als by Dominique Nabakov

White Girls on the Loose: Carla Kaplan and Hilton Als

Monday, February 3, 2014, 7 - 8 p.m.

Click here to reserve your free seats!

Carla Kaplan talks about her latest book, Miss Anne in Harlem: The White Women of the Black Renaissance, a portrait of the white, upper-class women of the 1920s who took part in the Harlem Renaissance, in a conversation with Hilton Als, a cultural critic for The New Yorker and the author, most recently, the author of White Girls. 

Philip Gourevitch Philip Gourevitch
Greg Grandin Greg Grandin
Amasa Delano rowing towards the ship, by Garrick Palmer Amasa Delano rowing towards the ship, by Garrick Palmer

"The Empire of Necessity": Greg Grandin and Philip Gourevitch

Thursday, January 30, 2014, 7 - 8 p.m.

Click here to reserve your free seats!

This event has been rescheduled for THURSDAY, JANUARY 30TH AT 7PM. We will keep your reservation unless you wish to cancel for the new date. The event will still be held in the South Court Auditorium. If you haven't signed up yet, there is still time to reserve seats!

Jennifer Homans Jennifer Homans
Balanchine & the Lost Muse: Revolution & the Making of a Choreographer Balanchine & the Lost Muse: Revolution & the Making of a Choreographer
Elizabeth Kendall Elizabeth Kendall
Apollo's Angels Apollo's Angels

Elizabeth Kendall and Jennifer Homans

Tuesday, December 10, 2013, 7 - 8 p.m.

We are no longer accepting reservations for this event. There will be a stand-by line on the night of the program for guests without a reservation. There is no guarantee seats will become available.

Former fellow Elizabeth Kendall talks about her new book, Balanchine & the Lost Muse: Revolution & the Making of a Choreographer, with Jennifer Homans, the author of Apollo’s Angels

This event is co-presented with the Library for the Performing Arts

Lore Segal, Photo by Ellen Dubin Lore Segal, Photo by Ellen Dubin
The Impossible Lives of Greta Wells The Impossible Lives of Greta Wells
Andrew Sean Greer Andrew Sean Greer
Half the Kingdom Half the Kingdom
Julie Orringer Julie Orringer

Andrew Sean Greer, Julie Orringer, and Lore Segal

Monday, November 18, 2013, 7 - 8 p.m.

Three former fellows discuss Greer’s and Segal’s new novels, The Impossible Lives of Greta Wells and Half the Kingdom, respectively. Orringer will moderate the conversation. 

Year Zero: A History of 1945 Year Zero: A History of 1945
Ian Buruma Ian Buruma
Martin Amis, Photo by Michael Lionstar Martin Amis, Photo by Michael Lionstar

Ian Buruma and Martin Amis

Thursday, October 17, 2013, 7 - 8 p.m.

We are no longer accepting reservations for this event. There will be a stand-by line on the night of the program for guests without a reservation. There is no guarantee seats will become available.

Ian Buruma talks with the novelist Martin Amis about Year Zero: A History of 1945, which Buruma wrote while he was a fellow at the Cullman Center.

Farah Jasmine Griffin Farah Jasmine Griffin
Sharifa Rhodes-Pitts Sharifa Rhodes-Pitts
Harlem Nocturne Harlem Nocturne
Harlem is Nowhere Harlem is Nowhere

Farah Jasmine Griffin and Sharifa Rhodes-Pitts

Tuesday, September 24, 2013, 6:30 - 8 p.m.

Click here to reserve your free seats!

The former fellow Farah Jasmine Griffin discusses her new book, Harlem Nocturne: Women Artists and Progressive Politics During World War II, with the writer Sharifa Rhodes-Pitts, author of Harlem is Nowhere. This discussion is part of the “Between the Lines” series, curated by the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, and co-presented with the Cullman Center. It will take place at the Schomburg Center. 

Deborah Cohen Deborah Cohen
Andrew Solomon by Annie Leibovitz Andrew Solomon by Annie Leibovitz
Family Secrets: Shame and Privacy in Modern Britain Family Secrets: Shame and Privacy in Modern Britain

Shame and Love, Secrets and Families

Monday, April 29, 2013, 7 - 8 p.m.

We are no longer accepting reservations for this event. There will be a stand-by line on the night of the program for guests without a reservation. There is no guarantee seats will become available.

Please note: since the library closes early on Mondays, we ask that all attendees enter the library at the 42nd Street entrance. Ushers will be available to guide you to the South Court Auditorium.

Deborah Cohen, a former Cullman Center fellow and the author of the newly-published Family Secrets: Shame and Privacy in Modern Britain, talks with Andrew Solomon about shame and families, past and present.

The New York Review of Books 1963 The New York Review of Books 1963
Robert Silvers, photo by Stephen Barker Robert Silvers, photo by Stephen Barker
Andrew Delbanco Andrew Delbanco
Alma Guillermoprieto, photo by Claudio Alvarez for El Pais Alma Guillermoprieto, photo by Claudio Alvarez for El Pais
Ian Buruma, photo by Michael Childers Ian Buruma, photo by Michael Childers
Joseph Lelyveld, photo by Aaron Salcido Joseph Lelyveld, photo by Aaron Salcido
Zoë Heller, photo by Guy Aroch Zoë Heller, photo by Guy Aroch

Celebrating 50 Years of The New York Review of Books. The Future of Literary Journalism: A Conversation with Ian Buruma, Andrew Delbanco, Alma Guillermoprieto, and Zoë Heller, moderated by Robert Silvers and Joseph Lelyveld

Wednesday, April 3, 2013, 7 - 8 p.m.

We are no longer accepting reservations for this event. There will be a stand-by line on the night of the program for guests without a reservation. There is no guarantee seats will become available.

Noted contributors to the Review honor its essential place in contemporary culture. This event, a co-presentation with The New York Review of Books, will take place in the Celeste Bartos Forum.

Jill Lepore by Dari Michele Jill Lepore by Dari Michele
Edgar Allan Poe Edgar Allan Poe
Watercolor by Phebe Folger Watercolor by Phebe Folger
Dissection by Leonardo da Vinci Dissection by Leonardo da Vinci
Daguerreotype, Nelson-Atkins Gallery Daguerreotype, Nelson-Atkins Gallery

The Joanna Jackson Goldman Memorial Lectures in American Civilization and Government: HIDDEN, THE HISTORY OF SECRECY

Tuesday, March 26, 2013, 7 - 8 p.m.

The Joanna Jackson Goldman Memorial Lecture on American Civilization and Government

This biannual lecture series at The New York Public Library, established by the Estate of the historian Eric F. Goldman in honor of his wife, aims to encourage provocative comment and analysis concerning contemporary issues of deep, long-term significance for American democracy. 
 
We are no longer accepting reservations for these events. There will be a stand-by line on the night of each program for guests without a reservation. There is no guarantee seats will become available.
 

Part One: Mystery

Tuesday, March 19, 2013, 7-8 pm

Beginning with the story of an Invisible Lady who visited New York City in 1804, Jill Lepore considers the strange history of the relationship between the unseen and the unknown. In this first of two illustrated lectures that range from the mysteries of the medieval church to the privacy settings on Facebook, Lepore argues that what was once mysterious became secret and, finally, private.

Part Two: Privacy  

Tuesday, March 26, 2013, 7-8 pm

In her second illustrated lecture, Lepore considers a paradox of contemporary culture in which the only thing more cherished than privacy is publicity. Tracing the origins of privacy to the early modern practice of keeping common-place books, Lepore chronicles the history of hermits, recluses, and invisible men, from H.G. Wells to Ralph Ellison to people who post on Instagram. 

Adam Shatz Adam Shatz
Robyn Creswell Robyn Creswell

Sonallah Ibrahim: Literature and Revolution in Egypt. A conversation between Robyn Creswell and Adam Shatz

Monday, March 4, 2013, 7 - 8 p.m.

CLICK HERE TO RESERVE YOUR FREE SEATS

Two former Cullman Center fellows, Robyn Creswell and Adam Shatz, talk about Creswell's translations of the Egyptian novelist's fictional masterpiece, That Smell, and his Notes from Prison.

José Manuel Prieto, by Anna Weise José Manuel Prieto, by Anna Weise
Esther Allen Esther Allen
Encyclopedia of a Life in Russia Encyclopedia of a Life in Russia

Encyclopedia of a Life in Russia

Tuesday, February 12, 2013, 7 - 8 p.m.

We are no longer accepting reservations for this event. There will be a stand-by line on the night of the program for guests without a reservation. There is no guarantee seats will become available.

The former Cullman Center fellows José Manuel Prieto and Esther Allen talk with Keith Gessen about Prieto’s new novel, which Allen translated.

Karen Russell Karen Russell
Ian Frazier Ian Frazier
Molly O'Neill Molly O'Neill
Laura Shapiro Laura Shapiro
Danny Meyer Danny Meyer

Lunch Stories with Ian Frazier, Karen Russell, Danny Meyer, and Molly O'Neill

Tuesday, December 11, 2012, 7 - 9 p.m.

WE ARE NO LONGER TAKING RESERVATIONS FOR THIS EVENT. LAST MINUTE TICKETS MAY BECOME AVAILABLE THE NIGHT OF THE EVENT. IF YOU ARRIVE AT THE LIBRARY BEFORE 7PM ON THE 11TH YOUR NAME CAN BE PLACED ON A WAITING LIST BUT WE CANNOT GUARANTEE YOU A SEAT. 

Writers Ian Frazier and Karen Russell and restaurateur Danny Meyer tell favorite stories about lunch, with an introduction by Laura Shapiro and Rebecca Federman, the curators of the Library's current Lunch Hour NYC exhibition. Their conversation will be moderated by Molly O'Neill.

Darryl Pinckney Darryl Pinckney

Race and American Political Culture

Thursday, November 29, 2012, 7 - 9 p.m.

The Robert B. Silvers Lecture
This program is co-sponsored by LIVE from the NYPL

Following this year’s election, writer Darryl Pinckney will discuss the role of race and voting rights in American politics for the 2012 Robert B. Silvers Lecture. He is the author of the novel High Cotton, and, in the Alain Locke Lecture Series, Out There: Mavericks of Black Literature. He is also a former fellow of The Dorothy & Lewis B. Cullman Center for Scholars & Writers at the New York Public Library.

Barry Edelstein Barry Edelstein
Nathan Englander Nathan Englander
Alexis Soloski Alexis Soloski

Nathan Englander in Conversation with Barry Edelstein, moderated by Alexis Soloski

Thursday, October 18, 2012, 7 - 9 p.m.

For this event, please enter the building through the 5th Avenue entrance

Former fellow Nathan Englander discusses his new play, The Twenty Seventh Man, which opens at the Public Theater in November, with the director Barry Edelstein and the journalist Alexis Soloski.

John Tresch John Tresch
The Romantic Machine by John Tresch The Romantic Machine by John Tresch
Simon Critchley Simon Critchley

John Tresch in conversation with Simon Critchley

Thursday, October 11, 2012, 7 - 9 p.m.

Former fellow John Tresch discusses his new book The Romantic Machine with philosopher Simon Critchley. 

Pankaj Mishra Pankaj Mishra
Ian Buruma Ian Buruma
From the Ruins of Empire From the Ruins of Empire

Pankaj Mishra in conversation with Ian Buruma

Monday, September 24, 2012, 7 - 8:30 p.m.

Former Cullman Center fellows Pankaj Mishra and Ian Buruma discuss Mishra's new book, From the Ruins of Empire: The Intellectuals Who Remade Asia

Please note that the address of this program has changed

James Fenton James Fenton
Robyn Creswell Robyn Creswell

A Paris Review Interview: James Fenton and Robyn Creswell

Thursday, May 17, 2012, 7 - 9 p.m.

Robyn Creswell, a literary translator and the poetry editor of The Paris Review, will talk with the distinguished poet, journalist, and essayist James Fenton in a Paris Review interview. Both participants in the evening are current Fellows at the Library’s Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers.   

This program is now full. Stand-by seats may be available on a first-come, first-served basis.

The Newlyweds The Newlyweds
Nell Freudenberger, photo by David Jacobs Nell Freudenberger, photo by David Jacobs
Eliza Griswold Eliza Griswold

Nell Freudenberger and Eliza Griswold

Tuesday, May 8, 2012, 7 - 9 p.m.

Former Cullman Center Fellow Nell Freudenberger discusses her new book, The Newlyweds, with journalist and poet Eliza Griswold at the New York Public Library. In her acutely perceptive and witty new novel, Freudenberger tells the story of an arranged marriage between a Bangladeshi woman and a man from Rochester, New York. In 2010, Freudenberger appeared in The New Yorker's "Top 20 Under 40" issue. 

Eliza Griswold is a journalist and poet whose most recent book, The Tenth Parallel: Dispatches from the Fault Line between Christianity and Islam, won the J. Anthony Lukas Book Prize in 2011. Griswold has published poetry in The New Yorker, The Atlantic, Harper's, and elsewhere. 

To reserve your free seats, please click here

Hari Kunzru Hari Kunzru
Gods Without Men Gods Without Men
Teju Cole Teju Cole

Hari Kunzru and Teju Cole

Wednesday, March 7, 2012, 7 - 9 p.m.

Former Cullman fellow Hari Kunzru discusses his new novel, Gods Without Men, with author Teju Cole.

To reserve your free seats, please click here.

What We Talk About When We Talk About Anne Frank What We Talk About When We Talk About Anne Frank
Nathan Englander Nathan Englander
Sarah Jones Sarah Jones

Nathan Englander and Sarah Jones

Wednesday, February 8, 2012, 7 - 9 p.m.

Former Cullman fellow Nathan Englander in conversation with playwright and performer Sarah Jones about his new collection of stories entitled, What We Talk About When We Talk About Anne Frank.

This program is now full. Seats may be available on a first-come, first-served basis on the night of the event.

Pulphead Pulphead
John Jeremiah Sullivan, photo by John Taylor John Jeremiah Sullivan, photo by John Taylor
Wells Tower Wells Tower

John Jeremiah Sullivan and Wells Tower

Thursday, December 15, 2011, 7 - 9 p.m.

Former CSW Fellows John Jeremiah Sullivan and Wells Tower discuss the art of the essay in light of Sullivan's new book, Pulphead.

This program is currently full. There may be seats available on the night of the event on a first-come, first-served basis.

Lorin Stein, photo by Mathieu Bourgois Lorin Stein, photo by Mathieu Bourgois
Jean Strouse Jean Strouse

The James Family

Wednesday, December 7, 2011, 7 - 9 p.m.

Jean Strouse talks to Lorin Stein, editor of The Paris Review, about the James Family on the occasion of the re-issue of Strouse's biogarphy, Alice James. 

This program is now full. There may be seats available on a first-come, first-served basis the evening of the event.

Alphabetter Juice Alphabetter Juice
Roy Blount Jr., photo by Joan Griswold Roy Blount Jr., photo by Joan Griswold
James Shapiro James Shapiro

Roy Blount Jr.and James Shapiro

Wednesday, November 16, 2011, 7 - 9 p.m.

Roy Blount discusses his new book, Alphabetter Juice with James Shapiro.

Registration for this event is now closed. There are still seats available. Please call 212-930-0084 if you would like to attend.

Daniel Mendelsohn Daniel Mendelsohn

James Romm and Daniel Mendelsohn

Wednesday, November 2, 2011, 7 - 9 p.m.

James Romm and Daniel Mendelsohn discuss Romm's Ghost on the Throne.

Registration for this event is now closed. There are still seats available. If you would like to attend tonight please call 212-930-0084.

The Convert The Convert
Deborah Baker, photo by Julienne Schaer Deborah Baker, photo by Julienne Schaer
Elizabeth Rubin Elizabeth Rubin

Deborah Baker and Elizabeth Rubin

Tuesday, October 18, 2011, 7 - 9 p.m.
In a conversation with the journalist Elizabeth Rubin, Deborah Baker will discuss her latest book, The Convert, which Baker wrote when she was a Fellow at the Cullman Center in 2008-2009. Drawing from papers she found in The New York Public Library's Manuscripts and Archives Division, Baker tells the true story of Margaret Marcus -- a Jewish girl from Larchmont who converted to radical Islam, moved to Lahore, and continues to live there as Maryam Jameelah. The Convert was just nominated for the 2011 National Book Award.

Elizabeth Rubin is an acclaimed journalist who has covered wars in Bosnia, Iraq Afghanistan, and Pakistan. She is a regular contributor to The New York Times Magazine, Vogue, Harper's, and The New York Times, among other publications.
Drama, An Actor's Education Drama, An Actor's Education
John Lithgow John Lithgow
Bill Moyers Bill Moyers

John Lithgow and Bill Moyers

Tuesday, October 11, 2011, 7 - 9 p.m.

John Lithgow discusses his new memoir, Drama, An Actor's Education with Bill Moyers.

This event is co-presented with LIVE from the NYPL. Tickets are now available here.

Up From the Stacks Up From the Stacks
Mark Mulcahy and Ben Katchor Mark Mulcahy and Ben Katchor

Up From the Stacks, A musical theater piece by Ben Katchor and Mark Mulcahy

Wednesday, October 5, 2011, 7 - 9 p.m.

Set in The New York Public Library at Fifth Avenue and 42nd Street and in the environs of Times Square circa 1970, Up From the Stacks is the story of Lincoln Cabinée, a college student working part-time as a page, retrieving books for readers from the Library’s collection of 43 million items. This routine evening job inadvertently thrusts young Cabinée into the treacherous crossroads of scholarly obsession and the businesses of amusement and vice that then flourished in the 42nd Street area. The intellectual life of the city and the happiness of a young man hang in the balance.

Co-commissioned by the Dorothy and Lewis B. Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers at The New York Public Library, and Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts for Target Free Thursdays at the David Rubenstein Atrium.

Up From the Stacks Up From the Stacks
Mark Mulcahy and Ben Katchor Mark Mulcahy and Ben Katchor

Up From the Stacks, A musical theater piece by Ben Katchor and Mark Mulcahy

Tuesday, October 4, 2011, 7 - 9 p.m.

Set in The New York Public Library at Fifth Avenue and 42nd Street and in the environs of Times Square circa 1970, Up From the Stacks is the story of Lincoln Cabinée, a college student working part-time as a page, retrieving books for readers from the Library’s collection of 43 million items. This routine evening job inadvertently thrusts young Cabinée into the treacherous crossroads of scholarly obsession and the businesses of amusement and vice that then flourished in the 42nd Street area. The intellectual life of the city and the happiness of a young man hang in the balance.

Co-commissioned by the Dorothy and Lewis B. Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers at The New York Public Library, and Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts for Target Free Thursdays at the David Rubenstein Atrium.

Stacy Schiff Stacy Schiff
Cleopatra Cleopatra

Stacy Schiff

Friday, September 23, 2011, 7 - 9 p.m.

The distinguished biographer, Pulitzer Prize winner and former Cullman Center Fellow Stacy Schiff discusses her highly acclaimed biography Cleopatra.

STACY SCHIFF is also the author of Véra (Mrs. Vladimir Nabokov), winner of the Pulitzer Prize; Saint-Exupéry, a Pulitzer Prize finalist; and A Great Improvisation: Franklin, France, and the Birth of America, winner of the George Washington Book Prize. Schiff has received fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation and the National Endowment for the Humanities, and has contributed frequently to the New York Times op-ed page. She lives in New York City.

This event is co-presented with LIVE from the NYPL. Tickets are now available here.

Francine Prose Francine Prose
David Bezmozgis David Bezmozgis
The Free World The Free World
My American Life My American Life

David Bezmozgis and Francine Prose

Monday, May 9, 2011, 7 - 11 p.m.
David Bezmozgis, author of the story collection Natasha, and Francine Prose, whose most recent book is Anne Frank, talk about their novels The Free World and My New American Life, respectively.

Both books are available in the Library's Book Shop by clicking on the titles.

Reservations for this program are now closed. Stand-by seats will be available on a first-come, first-served basis.

A Visit from the Goon Squad A Visit from the Goon Squad
Jennifer Egan Jennifer Egan

Jennifer Egan in conversation with Laura Miller

Thursday, April 14, 2011, 7 - 9 p.m.

Jennifer Egan’s spellbinding interlocking narratives circle the lives of Bennie Salazar, an aging former punk rocker and record executive, and Sasha, the passionate, troubled young woman he employs. Although Bennie and Sasha never discover each other’s pasts, the reader does, in intimate detail, along with the secret lives of a host of other characters whose paths intersect with theirs, over many years, in locales as varied as New York, San Francisco, Naples, and Africa.

JENNIFER EGAN is the author of The Invisible Circus, Emerald City and Other Stories, Look at Me, which was nominated for the National Book Award in 2001, and the bestselling The Keep.  Her new book, A Visit From the Goon Squad, a national bestseller, was published last June.  Also a journalist, she writes frequently in the New York Times Magazine.

George Packer George Packer
"Broken America" "Broken America"

Broken America

Wednesday, April 13, 2011, 7 p.m.

The Joanna Jackson Goldman Memorial Lectures in American Civilization and Government

“Broken America”
Two lectures by the author and New Yorker writer George Packer on the decline of American institutions, from government and business to the media. The lectures are consecutive; however, you are not obligated to attend both.
 

Please note: We are no longer taking reservations for this program. Stand-by seats may be available on the night of the event.


George Packer George Packer
"Broken America" "Broken America"

Broken America

Wednesday, April 6, 2011, 7 - 9 p.m.

The Joanna Jackson Goldman Memorial Lectures in American Civilization and Government

“Broken America”
Two lectures by the author and New Yorker writer George Packer on the decline of American institutions, from government and business to the media. The lectures are consecutive; however, you are not obligated to attend both.
 

Please note: We are no longer taking reservations for this program. Stand-by seats may be available on the night of the event.


Black Gotham Black Gotham
Carla Peterson Carla Peterson
Annette Gordon-Reed Annette Gordon-Reed

Carla Peterson and Annette Gordon-Reed

Wednesday, March 30, 2011, 7 - 9 p.m.
Carla Peterson discusses her book Black Gotham: A Family History of African Americans in Nineteenth Century New York City with the Pulitzer-prize-winning historian Annette Gordon-Reed, author of The Hemingses of Monticello: An American Family.

This event is currently full. Seats will be available on a stand-by basis only on the night of the event.

Carla Peterson and Annette Gordon-Reed's books are available at the Library's Book Shop by clicking on the book's title.

Swamplandia! Swamplandia!
Karen Russell Karen Russell
Wells Tower Wells Tower

Karen Russell and Wells Tower

Tuesday, March 15, 2011, 7 - 9 p.m.
Karen Russell, named one of Granta’s Best of Young American Novelists in 2007, talks about her novel Swamplandia! with Wells Tower, author of Everything Ravaged, Everything Burned and winner of The New York Public Library’s 2010 Young Lions’ Fiction Award.  
 
Co-Sponsored with the Library's Young Lions Program.

Click here to reserve your free tickets.

Karen Russell and Wells Tower's books are available at the Library's Book Shop by clicking on the book's title.

Liberty's Exiles Liberty's Exiles
Maya Jasanoff Maya Jasanoff
Jill Lepore Jill Lepore

Maya Jasanoff and Jill Lepore

Tuesday, March 1, 2011, 7 - 9 p.m.
Maya Jasanoff discusses her new book, Liberty’s Exiles: American Loyalists in the Revolutionary World, with Jill Lepore, a New Yorker writer and the author most recently of The Whites of Their Eyes: The Tea Party’s Revolution and the Battle Over American History
 

THIS EVENT IS FULL. However we will have a "first come, first served" standby line on Tuesday evening for seats available at the last minute.

Both Maya Jasanoff and Jill Lepore's books are available at the Library's Book Shop. To access the Book Shop, click on the book's title.

Colm Tóibín Colm Tóibín
The Empty Family The Empty Family

The Empty Family, A Conversation with Colm Tóibín

Thursday, February 3, 2011, 7 - 11:45 p.m.

Colm Tóibín, the author most recently of the novel Brooklyn, talks about his collection of short stories, The Empty Family.

Presented with LIVE from the NYPL. Please click here to purchase
 
Astra Taylor Astra Taylor
Anthony Gottlieb Anthony Gottlieb
Cornel West Cornel West
Lewis Lapham Lewis Lapham

Does Philosophy Still Matter?

Wednesday, January 26, 2011, 7 - 9 p.m.
A distinguished panel that includes Astra Taylor, Anthony Gottlieb, Simon Critchley, Cornel West, and James Miller – moderated by Lewis Lapham - will discuss the present state of philosophy in light of Miller’s  book, Examined Lives: From Socrates to Nietzsche.
Co-sponsored with The New School University
 This event will take place at The New School, Tishman Auditorium, 66 West 12th Street, at 7 p.m.

Admission is free. RSVP: Please email molok819@newschool.edu 

Radioactive Radioactive
Lauren Redniss Lauren Redniss
Radioactive Radioactive

Radioactive: Marie & Pierre Curie, A Tale of Love and Fallout

Friday, January 21, 2011, 7:30 - 11:45 p.m.

Nobel Laureate Harold Varmus, MD, talks with the artist Lauren Redniss about science, art, process, discovery, and the current New York Public Library exhibition of Redniss’s work, Radioactive: Marie & Pierre Curie, A Tale of Love and Fallout.

Co-presented with Science & the Arts, the Graduate Center of the City University of New York

This event is currently full. Standby tickets will be available the night of the event, first-come, first-served. Thank you.

Travels in Siberia Travels in Siberia
Robert Krulwich Robert Krulwich
Ian Frazier Ian Frazier

Ian Frazier and Robert Krulwich

Wednesday, December 1, 2010, 7 - 9 p.m.

The eminent author and New Yorker writer Ian Frazier talks with NPR and Radio Lab host Robert Krulwich about Frazier's new book,Travels in Siberia.

This event is free, but you must must reserve your seats (no more than four per person).

To do so, please write to cswevents@nypl.org

Edward Albee Edward Albee
Will Eno Will Eno

Edward Albee and Will Eno

Monday, November 15, 2010, 7 - 9 p.m.

This fall's theatre season includes the New York premiere of Edward Albee's Me, Myself & I at Playwrights Horizons and the opening of Will Eno's Middletown at the Vineyard Theatre.

 There are no more available seats for this event. Please visit Conversations from the Cullman Center for future events.

Locavores' Dilemmas

Thursday, October 21, 2010, 7:30 - 9 p.m.

Poet and Journalist Melanie Rehak, Steve Jenkins (The Food Life), Fairway's part-owner and cheese monger extraordinare, and David Shea, the founder of applewood restaurant in Brooklyn, discuss, among other things, Rehak's Eating for Beginners: An Education in the Pleasures of Food from Chefs, Farmers, and One Picky Kid. Their conversation will be moderated by the journalist and author Patrick Radden Keefe (Chatter, The Snakehead).

Visit the Library Book Shop by clicking on the title of the book

David Grossman and Nicole Krauss

Wednesday, October 13, 2010, 7 - 9 p.m.

David Grossman and Nicole Krauss talk about their new novels, To the End of the Land and Great House.

Great House was nominated for a National Book Award.

Presented with LIVE from the NYPL. Audio and video recordings of this event will be available shortly.

 Nicole KraussGreat HouseDavid GrossmanTo the End of the Land

Lore Segal in Conversation with Julie Orringer

Wednesday, May 5, 2010, 7 - 9 p.m.

Two former Cullman Center Fellows, the writers Julie Orringer and Lore Segal, read from and discuss their work.

Lore Segal is a novelist, essayist, translator, and writer of children’s books. Her celebrated works include Other People's Houses, Her First American, and Shakespeare’s Kitchen.  Segal's wickedly funny and timeless novella of the New York literary scene, Lucinella, has just been reissued by Melville House.*

Julie Orringer is the author of the acclaimed story collection How To Breathe Underwater (New York Times Notable Book, 2003).  Her first novel, The Invisible Bridge, will be published by Knopf in May.

* Read an excerpt from Lucinella here!

Contested Will: James Shapiro and Randy Cohen

Wednesday, April 7, 2010, 7 - 8 p.m.

Shakespeare authority and former Cullman Center Fellow James Shapiro returns to the Library to talk about his critically acclaimed new book, Contested Will: Who Wrote Shakespeare? with "The Ethicist" of The New York Times, journalist and playwright Randy Cohen. Don't miss Shapiro's first New York appearance!

Hillary Mantel, the author of Wolf Hall, calls Contested Will "riveting" and The Financial Times hailed Shapiro's book as "a terrific read." Click here to read Mantel's full review in The Guardian.

Note new location! This event has been moved to the Celeste Bartos Forum. Please enter the building through the 42nd Street entrance, just west of Fifth Avenue.

Picturing Dorothea Lange: A Conversation with Linda Gordon and Ian Frazier

Thursday, February 25, 2010, 7 - 8 p.m.

Linda Gordon, a former Cullman Center Fellow and author of the acclaimed new biography Dorothea Lange: A Life Beyond Limits, talks about the celebrated documentary photographer's unparalleled work and intriguing life with writer Ian Frazier, a current Cullman Center Fellow and regular contributor to The New Yorker.

 

 

Laurie Sheck: Home Movies of Frankenstein’s Monster

Thursday, October 15, 2009, 8 - 9 p.m.

Former Cullman Center Fellow Laurie Sheck delivers a reading, with film accompaniment, from A Monster's Notes, her mesmerizing reimagining of the life of the "monster" at the heart of Mary Shelley's classic novel, Frankenstein.

Featuring a special, one-night-only exhibition from the Library's Pforzheimer Collection of Shelley and His Circle.

The Snakehead: Patrick Keefe and Suketu Mehta

Wednesday, September 23, 2009, 8 - 9 p.m.

Former Cullman Center Fellow Patrick Radden Keefe returns to the Library to discuss his latest book, The Snakehead, with Suketu Mehta, journalist and author of the acclaimed Maximum City: Bombay Lost and Found.

The Snakehead is a brilliant, non-fiction page-turner about the human smuggling ring operated out of New York's Chinatown in the 1990s that was recently hailed by New York Magazine as a "riveting blend of true crime and immigration history."

Don't miss this conversation about the fascinating and complicated intersection between the international underworld and the American dream.

Presented in conjunction with Freedom Week.

A Check-Room Romance: Ben Katchor and Mark Mulcahy

Friday, May 15, 2009, 7 p.m.

In this new, musical tragicomedy by cartoonist and former Cullman Center Fellow Ben Katchor and composer, musician and vocalist Mark Mulcahy, one man's casual obsession with the architecture and culture of coat checkrooms ensnares him in a desperate struggle between employment agents, maitre 'ds, lovesick podiatrists, low-budget contractors, and paraphilic playboys.

A Check-Room Romance was commissioned by the Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers. Don't miss this world premiere!

A Check-Room Romance: Ben Katchor and Mark Mulcahy

Wednesday, May 13, 2009, 7 p.m.

In this new, musical tragicomedy by cartoonist and former Cullman Center Fellow Ben Katchor and composer, musician and vocalist Mark Mulcahy, one man's casual obsession with the architecture and culture of coat checkrooms ensnares him in a desperate struggle between employment agents, maitre 'ds, lovesick podiatrists, low-budget contractors, and paraphilic playboys.

A Check-Room Romance was commissioned by the Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers. Don't miss this world premiere!

T.J. Stiles and Kevin Baker: The First Tycoon

Thursday, April 30, 2009, 7 p.m.

T. J. Stiles talks about his compelling new biography, The First Tycoon: The Epic Life of Cornelius Vanderbilt, with novelist Kevin Baker.

T.J. Stiles is the author of Jesse James: Last Rebel of the Civil War. He worked on The First Tycoon while he was a Cullman Center Fellow, in 2004. Kevin Baker's acclaimed novels include the "New York, City of Fire" trilogy: Dreamland, Paradise Alley, and, most recently, Striver's Row

Mumbai, Terror, and Islamism

Tuesday, April 7, 2009, 7 p.m.

Frances FitzGerald: The New Evangelicals

Wednesday, March 25, 2009, 7 p.m.

Frances FitzGerald: Who Are the Evangelicals?

Wednesday, March 11, 2009, 7 p.m.

Pulitzer Prize-winning author and New Yorker writer Frances Fitzgerald delivers the first of three lectures in the series Politics in the Church: The Changing Face of Evangelical Christianity.

Using Jerry Falwell and the growth of the Moral Majority as a lens, Fitzgerald will look at how the agenda and constituency of the religious right emerged in relation to large social, economic, and philosophical forces during the twentieth century.

A Check-Room Romance

Thursday, November 13, 2008, 6 p.m.

Alphabet Juice: Roy Blount, Jr. and Jean Strouse

Thursday, October 23, 2008, 7 p.m.

The Lost Spy: Espionage & Idealism, Before the Cold War

Wednesday, September 24, 2008, 7 p.m.

Jeff Talarigo in Conversation with James Shapiro

Thursday, May 8, 2008, 7 p.m.

Mark Morris in Conversation with Wendy Lesser

Monday, May 5, 2008, 7 p.m.

Fresh Takes: Michael Kinsley, Maureen Dowd and Frank Rich, Moderated by Sean Wilentz

Monday, April 21, 2008, 7 p.m.

To celebrate the publication of Michael Kinsley's Please Don't Remain Calm: Provocations and Commentaries, a collection of witty and trenchant columns, the distinguished editorial writers Maureen Dowd and Frank Rich join Kinsley to discuss the pleasures and challenges of their craft.

Whalesong: Past and Future, New York and the World

Saturday, April 19, 2008, 11 a.m.

A symposium on the history, science and perennial romance of the leviathan in America

Presented in conjuction with the New York Institute for the Humanities and the Humanities Initiative at NYU

Jan Morris and Owen Sheers

Thursday, February 28, 2008, 6 p.m.

Joseph O'Connor and Colum McCann: Redemption Falls

Wednesday, November 14, 2007, 6 p.m.

Writers and former Cullman Fellows Joseph O'Connor and Colum McCann debut O'Connor's dazzling new novel, Redemption Falls, a panoramic tale of love, war, and the American West, which he wrote at the Cullman Center.

About the Participants:

Joseph O'Connor is the author of the novels Cowboys and Indians, Desperadoes, The Salesman, Inishowen, and Star of the Sea, which was published in 26 languages and received the Prix Litt?raire Europ?an Madeleine Zepter for European novel of the year, Ireland?s Hennessy/Sunday Tribune Literary Award, the Irish Post Award for Fiction, France?s Prix Millepages,and a Nielsen-BookScan Golden Book Award. His new novel, Redemption Falls, has been called "hypnotically effective" (Irish Independent) and was hailed on publication as a "superb achievement" by the Irish Times. O?Connor, who lives in Dublin, has also written short stories, film scripts, plays, and a critical biography of the poet Charles Donnelly.

Colum McCann is the author, most recently, of the acclaimed novel Zoli, which he researched while a Fellow at the Cullman Center in 2004. His other works include the novels This Side of Brightness and Dancer, and the story collections Fishing the Sloe-Black River and Everything in the Country Must. He has written for The New York Times, the New Yorker, The Atlantic Monthly, and GQ, and received Ireland's Rooney Prize for Literature.

Read a selection from Redemption Falls!

Co-presented by

Going Places: A Celebration of Leonard Michaels

Monday, October 22, 2007, 7 p.m.

A conversation about the work and legacy of writer Leonard Michaels, whose fearless, devastating stories were recently published in a collected edition by Farrar, Straus and Giroux. Featuring David Bezmozgis, Wyatt Mason, Robert Pinsky and Deborah Treisman, and moderated by Wendy Lesser.

About the Participants:

David Bezmozgis is a writer and documentary film maker. He is the author of the short story collection Natasha and Other Stories, which won a Commonwealth First Book Prize and the City of Toronto Book Award. His work has been published in Harper's and The New Yorker.

Wyatt Mason is a contributing editor of Harper's magazine, where his essays regularly appear. A translator of the complete works of Rimbaud, he received the 2005 Nona Balakian Citation for excellence in criticism from the National Book Critics Circle, and a National Magazine Award in 2006. He was a Fellow of the Cullman Center in 2003.

Robert Pinsky is the Poet Laureate Emeritus of the United States, and a prizewinning translator and literary critic. His works include Gulf Music, First Things to Hand, and The Inferno of Dante, which received the Academy of American Poets Translation Award and the Los Angeles Times Book Award.

Deborah Treisman is the fiction editor of The New Yorker. She previously served as that magazine's deputy fiction editor, and as the managing editor of Grand Street.

Wendy Lesser (Moderator) is the editor of the Threepenny Review and the author of several books, including, most recently, the novel The Pagoda in the Garden and the essays Room for Doubt. She was a Fellow of the Cullman Center in 2005.

This event is co-sponsored by Click below to read "Murderers," a story by Leonard Michaels. From LEONARD MICHAELS: The Collected Stories by Leonard Michaels, published by Farrar, Straus & Giroux, LLC. Copyright (c) 2007 by Katherine Ogden Michaels. All rights reserved.

Edmund White and Joyce Carol Oates

Tuesday, October 16, 2007, 7 p.m.

Former Cullman Fellow Edmund White discusses his latest novel, Hotel de Dream, with writer Joyce Carol Oates. About the Participants: Edmund White is the author of more than twenty works of fiction, non-fiction and biography, including A Boy's Own Story, Genet:A Biography, and My Lives. The recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship, the Prize for Literature from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, and a National Book Critics Circle Award, among other honors, he was named an Officier de L'Ordre des Arts et des Lettres by the French government. White teaches writing at Princeton University and is currently at work on a brief life of Arthur Rimbaud. Joyce Carol Oates is the Roger S. Berlind '52 Professor in the Humanities at Princeton University. She has published more than 100 works of fiction, non-fiction, poetry, and literary criticism, including several novels for young adults. Her work has received a National Book Award, the Rea Award for the Short Story,and the Prix Femina Etranger, among many other honors. Her newest work, The Journals of Joyce Carol Oates, 1972-1983, will be published this October by Harpercollins.

Julia Child in America

Wednesday, October 10, 2007, 7 p.m.

A discussion of the complex legacy of Julia Child, arguably America's first celebrity chef. Featuring culinary historians David Kamp, Molly O'Neill and Laura Shapiro; chef Dan Barber; and journalist and former Cullman Fellow Melanie Rehak as moderator.

About the Participants:

Dan Barber is the chef and co-owner of the critically acclaimed Blue Hill restaurant in New York City and Blue Hill at Stone Barns (Pocantico, NY) where he also serves as the Creative Director of the Stone Barns Center for Food and Agriculture. He is a recipient of the James Beard Award for Best Chef: New York City.

David Kamp is the author, most recently, of The United States of Arugula: How We Became a Gourmet Nation, which was named one of the New York Times 100 Most Notable Books for 2006. His next book, The Food Snob's Dictionary: An Essential Lexicon of Gastronomical Knowledge, co-authored by Marion Rosenfeld, will be published in October. Kamp is a contributing editor to Vanity Fair and GQ.

Molly O'Neill is the editor of American Food Writing: An Anthology with Classic Recipes (Library of America), and the author of several celebrated cookbooks, including the award-winning New York Cookbook, and a memoir. She is a former food columnist for the New York Times.

Laura Shapiro's most recent book is Julia Child (Penguin Lives),an acclaimed brief biography of the chef. A former Newsweek senior writer, she is the author of the award-winning culinary histories Perfection Salad: Women and Cooking at the Turn of the Century and Something from the Oven:Reinventing Dinner in 1950s America.

Melanie Rehak (Moderator) is the author of Girl Sleuth: Nancy Drew and the Women Who Made Her, which she researched while a Fellow at the Dorothy and Lewis B. Cullman Center for Scholars & Writers. She serves as Assistant Poetry Editor of The New Republic and her work has appeared in The New York Times Magazine, The New Yorker, and The Paris Review, among others.

Nathan Englander in Conversation with Ben Karlin

Tuesday, April 24, 2007, 7 p.m.

Found in Translation: Words Without Borders

Wednesday, April 18, 2007, 7 p.m.

Hermione Lee and Jean Strouse

Monday, April 16, 2007, 7 p.m.

Nuruddin Farah and Kwame Anthony Appiah

Wednesday, February 21, 2007, 6 p.m.

Colum McCann & Richard Price

Tuesday, January 30, 2007, 6 p.m.

Reconstruction in Retrospect

Monday, January 22, 2007, 6 p.m.

A Conversation between Thomas Bender and Eric Foner

Tuesday, April 25, 2006, 7 p.m.

Wendy Lesser: Ways of Looking at Photographs

Thursday, November 10, 2005, 6 p.m.

Einstein: The Man and His Legacy

Sunday, October 23, 2005, 10 a.m.

Einstein: The Man and His Legacy

Saturday, October 22, 2005, 9 a.m.

Beyond Homer: Linguistics, Archaeology, and The Iliad

Wednesday, May 18, 2005, 6:30 p.m.

Biography and Science

Tuesday, May 3, 2005, 6:30 p.m.

Writing/Science/Writing/ Science/Writing/Science/Writing

Wednesday, April 6, 2005, 6:30 p.m.

José Martí In New York

Tuesday, November 30, 2004, 5 p.m.

Facts and Fictions

Tuesday, November 9, 2004, 5 p.m.

Appropriating the Literary Past

Tuesday, October 26, 2004, 6 p.m.

April Fool's Day

Tuesday, September 14, 2004, 6 p.m.

Writing the Historical Novel

Wednesday, May 19, 2004, 6 p.m.

Development and Democracy: Past and Present

Tuesday, May 11, 2004, 6 p.m.

John Jeremiah Sullivan

Wednesday, March 31, 2004, 5 p.m.

The Changing Face of Harlem

Tuesday, March 30, 2004, 5 p.m.

A Distant Shore

Wednesday, November 5, 2003, 5 p.m.

Harlem Lost and Found

Tuesday, October 28, 2003, 5 p.m.

New York's First Regional Cuisine

Wednesday, May 7, 2003, 6 p.m.

Terror and Liberalism

Wednesday, April 30, 2003, 6 p.m.

The Jump of the Manta Ray ~ Salto de Mantarraya

Wednesday, April 23, 2003, 6 p.m.

Things You Should Know

Wednesday, November 6, 2002, 5 p.m.

Love In A Dark Time

Tuesday, October 29, 2002, 5 p.m.

Voice versus Personality

Tuesday, October 22, 2002, 6 p.m.

Listening for It

Tuesday, October 15, 2002, 6 p.m.

Finding a Voice

Tuesday, October 8, 2002, 6 p.m.

WHY WE FIGHT: HIV and AIDS in New York City Neighborhoods - Call for Artists, Writers, and Activists

Opportunity to study and collaborate with artist, writer, and activist Avram Finkelstein.

In conjunction with the WHY WE FIGHT: Remembering AIDS Activism exhibition, The New York Public Library will be hosting a project to create site-specific installations in four library branches—across the Bronx, Manhattan, and Staten Island—that explore the ways that HIV and AIDS are currently affecting these local New York City communities. The Library is putting out a call 

Read More ›
24 Frames per Second

24 Frames per Second

Everything and anything to do with with film and film programs at the New York Public Library.

Across A Crowded Room
Africa and the African Diaspora

Africa and the African Diaspora

The history and culture of Africans and African descendants around the world.

Archives

Archives: Out of the Box

This blog channel explores the library’s world-class and ever-growing archival holdings. We’ll examine these unique materials and the works produced by researchers consulting them. Open the box and delve into the archives with us!

Barrier-Free Library

Barrier-Free Library

The New York Public Library strives for total accessibility, no matter what our differences may be. Join us as we move down the path toward that goal.

Blog en Español

Blog en Español

Blog en Español incluye una serie selectiva de listas de libros nuevos en español de ficción y no ficción (Novedades), y otras listas conmemorativas y festivas de obras que pueden estar disponibles en diferentes formatos de audio, video y electrónico, además de información sobre programas y servicios ofrecidos en la Biblioteca Pública de Nueva York.

Community Information

Community Information

Resources and services for residents of the Bronx, Manhattan and Staten Island. Can't find what you need? Also try the Community Information Search in NYPL's Best of the Web.

eReading Room

eReading Room: The future of books at NYPL

There are so many new ways to access books and other digital reading matter on personal computers and portable devices. How to keep up? Library staff offer tips and tricks to get the most out of free ebooks online and our own eNYPL services, and share occasional thoughts on the future of reading.

Facing the Page

Facing the Page: Adult Learning Centers

Exploring adult literacy at the library. The voices and experiences of students and volunteer tutors at our Adult Learning Centers.

Food for Thought

Food for Thought

Uncovering the edible NYPL in books, menus, and ephemera.

For Teachers

For Teachers

This blog highlights the opportunities and resources for teachers that are available throughout the the NYPL system. Learn more about our primary sources, professional development opportunities and student learning experiences. Let NYPL help you reach your teaching and learning goals!

Freedom of Thought

Freedom of Thought

Reflections on the work of NYPL Correctional Services, promoting access to knowledge for incarcerated and formerly incarcerated people in our communities.

Hand-Made

Hand-Made

Are you interested in sewing and knitting, book arts and letterpress printing, traditional crafts and the new DIY, sewists of yesterday and today, vintage-inspired design, and all things handmade? Then join in the conversation at Hand-Made. We'll share information on unique items from the Library's collections as well as details on Library events that cater to the curious crafter in us all.

Inside NYPL

Inside NYPL

Dig deeper into NYPL and learn about new programs, projects, and services for patrons of all ages.

Je vois la vie en blogue… @vec NYPL

Je vois la vie en blogue… @vec NYPL

Bonjour francophones et francophiles new-yorkais! Bloguons en français avec la Bibliothèque publique de New York.

Bienvenus à ce nouvel espace dans le Web où toutes les personnes intéressées de célébrer les cultures francophones sont invitées à partager des idées et opinions sur différents sujets, soit en littérature, histoire, musique, événements, faits divers et plusieurs autres thèmes.

Job Search Central

Job Search Central: Looking for Work?

Let the Library guide your search for employment with everything from resume help to databases to classes.

LGBT@NYPL

LGBT@NYPL

Connecting you with the LGBT collections, programs, and expertise that The New York Public Library has to offer.

Lifelong Learning

Lifelong Learning

Part of NYPL's Mission is to inspire lifelong learning. No matter your age, where you are in life or what new thing you are trying to learn, you can follow this channel to get suggested resources as well as support and inspiration.

LIVE from the NYPL

LIVE from the NYPL

The before and afterlife of LIVE events. Learn about speakers, get background readings, interviews, clips and more. The conversation about the conversation.

Musical of the Month

Musical of the Month

Each month, a libretto of an important early American musical in a variety of electronic formats, plus associated photographs, vocal scores, and the occasional audio file.

My Library

My Library

Who I am.
Why I use the library.
...And what keeps me coming back.

Next Chapter

Next Chapter: A 50+ Library Blog

Don't despair if you are a Boomer, or a Silent, or a Greatest — the public library is with you every step of the way! This channel covers services, programs and other items of interest for the active older adult.

NYC Neighborhoods

NYC Neighborhoods

Five boroughs, 300 square miles, 6,375 miles of streets, 8.3 million people... hundreds of neighborhoods.

This channel covers the history, culture, people, hustle and bustle and goings-on of New York City.

NYPL Labs

NYPL Labs

NYPL Labs is an experimental technology unit that works closely with curators to create tools that expand the range of interaction, interpretation and reuse of research library collections and data. Learn more

Paperless Research

Paperless Research

The New York Public Library subscribes to hundreds of online databases and other information tools. Some are available onsite while others can be accessed at home using your library card number. This blog channel offers tips and tricks on getting the most out of online resources.

Periodically Speaking

Periodically Speaking

A reading series providing a major venue for emerging writers to present their work while emphasizing the diversity of America’s literary magazines and the magazine collections of The New York Public Library. Each event presents writers from three influential literary magazines—one poet, one fiction writer, one nonfiction writer—introduced by their editors. This blog provides coverage and context around Periodically Speaking events.

Poetry Month

Poetry Month

Each April, librarians throughout NYPL post readings, discussions and events celebrating National Poetry Month, a time when publishers, booksellers, literary organizations, libraries, schools and poets around the country band together to celebrate poetry and its vital place in American culture.

Popular Music

Popular Music

Libraries are thought of as quiet places, but that doesn't mean the NYPL doesn't know how to rock out. This channel will highlight popular music found in the library's collections.

Preservation

Preservation

News about the Library's preservation efforts and information for those interested in preserving their own collections. About the Barbara Goldsmith Preservation Division.

Reader’s Den

Reader’s Den

The Reader’s Den is an online book discussion group offering library readers with busy lifestyles a convenient way to connect with books and The New York Public Library.  This virtual discussion is accessible 24/7 and gives readers an opportunity to spark insightful discussions with the surrounding community by reading at his or her own pace.

The NYPL Broadcast

The NYPL Broadcast

The NYPL Broadcast serves up the latest in audio and video recordings made at The New York Public Library, everything from short profiles of our staff and collections, to full-length recordings of our LIVE from the NYPL, KidsLive and TeenLIVE programs.

The Ticketless Traveler

The Ticketless Traveler

Travel the world without leaving your chair with these book, film and music recommendations.

Three Faiths

Three Faiths

Librarians, curators, programmers, educators, and users share their thoughts on faith, and discuss the Library's Three Faiths exhibition. Check here regularly from October to February 2011 for: behind-the-scenes glimpses at the making of the exhibition; art, literature, and music at the intersection of Judiasm, Christianity, and Islam; lively discussions about the similarities and differences among these three religions... And more!

Vandamm

Vandamm

This blog channel is inspired by the exhibition at the Library for the Performing Arts, Poet of Light: Florence Vandamm & the Vandamm Studio, which is on view from September 2013 through February 2014. The exhibition samples the photographs, key sheets and negatives are becoming available on the Digital Gallery.

Women's History Month

Women's History Month

In honor of Women's History Month, each March, NYPL librarians present a monthlong series of posts highlighting the many amazing women they've discovered through the print and online resources of The New York Public Library.

All Possible Worlds

All Possible Worlds: Conversations on Voltaire's 'Candide'

Based in the recently closed exhibition Candide at 250: Scandal and Success, this blog traces the vectors Voltaire's book has taken through the popular and scholarly imagination. Posts frequently reference passages and commentaries in an experimental online edition, Candide 2.0. Learn more...

Design by the Book

Design by the Book

Mining the Library's collections for art and craft inspiration.

Duke Jazz Series

Duke Jazz Series

Coverage and context on The Duke Jazz Series and Talks at the Library for the Performing Arts.

Haiti

Haiti

NYPL resources on the history, culture and geography of Haiti, and information on rebuilding and relief efforts in the aftermath of the January, 2010 earthquake.

The Great American Revue

The Great American Revue

Revues and other topical popular entertainment of the early 20th century.