The Moth: Melissa Bank, Bliss Broyard, Ophira Eisenberg, Jeffrey Rudell & Josh Swiller, Paul Holdengräber, host

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Rebecca Mead Rebecca Mead

Rebecca Mead | Paul Holdengräber

Wednesday, January 29, 2014, 7 - 8 p.m.

A passionate attachment to a great work of literature can shape our lives and help us to read our own histories. 

James McBride James McBride

James McBride and The Good Lord Bird Band

Friday, January 24, 2014, 7 - 8 p.m.

James McBride opens LIVE from the NYPL's Spring 2014 season with an exploration of his latest work The Good Lord Bird - winner of the 2013 National Book Award for fiction - through words and music. The evening will feature conversation with the author and musician, as well as performances by McBride and his quintet, whose mix of spirituals and jazz renditions of classic gospel songs are inspired by the abolitionist John Brown, a key figure in this novel. With Keith Robinson on guitar, Trevor Exter on bass, Show Tyme Brooks on drums, Adam Faulk on piano, McBride on saxophone and the whole band on vocals.

Paul Auster Paul Auster
Isaac Gewirtz Isaac Gewirtz

Auster on Poe: A Conversation with Paul Auster and Isaac Gewirtz

Thursday, January 16, 2014, 7 - 8:30 p.m.

Award-winning writer Paul Auster (The New York Trilogy,Winter Journal) talks with Isaac Gewirtz, Curator of The Henry W. and Albert A. Berg Collection of English and American Literature, NYPL, and Poe exhibition co-curator, about his life spent reading and rereading the works of Edgar Allan Poe. Auster's first book purchase, at the age of nine, was a Modern Library edition of Poe's poems and stories, and his engagement with Poe has been consistent ever since. Auster will discuss Poe's influence on his own writing, and will revisit a lecture delivered on Poe three decades ago, currently housed with his papers in Berg collection. Co-presented by the Morgan and LIVE from the NYPL.

Junot Diaz Junot Diaz
Toni Morrison Toni Morrison
Elizabeth Gilbert Elizabeth Gilbert
Ann Patchett Ann Patchett
Martin Cruz Smith Martin Cruz Smith
Michael Connelly Michael Connelly

Michael Connelly | Martin Cruz Smith

Wednesday, December 4, 2013, 7 p.m.

Visit our YouTube channel to view our event LIVE on December 4 at 7 p.m.

Masters of the mystery genre, bestselling-authors Michael Connelly and Martin Cruz Smith will reveal how they've kept readers at the edge of their seats for decades.

Daphne Brooks Daphne Brooks
Dean Blackwood Dean Blackwood
Greil Marcus Greil Marcus
Scott Blackwood Scott Blackwood
Jack White Jack White

Exploring The Rise and Fall of Paramount Records: Featuring Jack White, Dean and Scott Blackwood, Daphne A. Brooks, and Greil Marcus

Tuesday, November 19, 2013, 7 p.m.

SOLD OUT!

Exploring The Rise and Fall of Paramount Records: Featuring Jack White, Dean and Scott Blackwood, Daphne A. Brooks, and Greil Marcus

Kermit Lynch Kermit Lynch
Alice Waters Alice Waters

Alice Waters | Kermit Lynch

Monday, November 18, 2013, 7 p.m.

SOLD OUT!

Acclaimed for their culinary works, Chez Panisse restaurateur Alice Waters and James Beard Award-winner and wine importer Kermit Lynch discuss their mutual interests in food, wine, and the impact on the environment.

Mike Tyson Mike Tyson

Mike Tyson

Tuesday, November 12, 2013, 7 p.m.

SOLD OUT!

Boxing champion, Broadway headliner, felon—Mike Tyson has defied expectations and conventional wisdom during his three decades in the public eye. Tyson, the one-time heavyweight champion of the world and a legend both in and out of the ring, joins LIVE for a conversation about his tumultuous life in the same straightforward and sincere tone seen in his new memoir, Undisputed Truth.

Lou Reed Lou Reed

Lou Reed on Edgar Allan Poe

Tuesday, November 5, 2013, 7 - 8:30 p.m.

We are deeply saddened by the sudden passing of Lou Reed. Ticket holders to the program can contact the Morgan box office at 212.685.0008 ext. 560 or tickets@themorgan.org.

Ira Glass Ira Glass
Nico Muhly Nico Muhly

Nico Muhly | Ira Glass

Tuesday, October 29, 2013, 7 p.m.

Co-Presented by The Metropolitan Opera

As his first large-scale opera,Two Boys, has its U.S. premiere at the Metropolitan Opera, composer Nico Muhly sits down with Ira Glass (host, NPR's "This American Life") for a colorful, wide-ranging conversation about music, life, and whatever piques their interest. The program will include musical illustrations by Muhly on piano.

Lorrie Moore Lorrie Moore

Lorrie Moore: "Watching Television"

Friday, October 25, 2013, 7 p.m.

Lorrie Moore presents the annual Robert B. Silvers lecture, entitled “Watching Television.”

The Buffetts The Buffetts
Tom Brokaw Tom Brokaw

Warren Buffett | Howard G. Buffett | Howard W. Buffett | Tom Brokaw

Wednesday, October 23, 2013, 7 p.m.

SOLD OUT!

The Moth The Moth

The Moth: Featuring George Dawes Green, Andrew Solomon, Catherine Burns and More!

Tuesday, October 15, 2013, 7 p.m.

A captivating forum for sharing experiences, The Moth has asserted itself as a remarkable space to express and indulge in stories that shape our lives.

Jaron Lanier Jaron Lanier

Jaron Lanier

Thursday, October 10, 2013, 7 p.m.

A pioneer in virtual reality, Jaron Lanier takes the stage for a conversation about the future of libraries and information. Lanier is the author of You Are Not A Gadget and most recently Who Owns The Future?.

Khalil Gibran Muhammad Khalil Gibran Muhammad
Jesmyn Ward Jesmyn Ward
William Jelani Cobb William Jelani Cobb

Jesmyn Ward in Conversation with William Jelani Cobb and Khalil Gibran Muhammad

Monday, September 30, 2013, 7 p.m.

LIVE welcomes back NYPL Young Lions Fiction Award finalist Jesmyn Ward, author of Where the Line Bleeds and the National Book Award-winner Salvage the Bones.

Alan Rusbridger Alan Rusbridger

Alan Rusbridger

Wednesday, September 25, 2013, 7 p.m.

Alan Rusbridger, Editor-in-Chief of the Guardian, will discuss his quest to learn Chopin's Ballade No. 1 during a year bookended by Wikileaks and the News of the World phone-hacking scandal. He will also describe the Guardian's recent publication of Edward Snowden's NSA leaks.

John Ashbery John Ashbery
Adam Fitzgerald Adam Fitzgerald
Timothy Donnelly Timothy Donnelly
Robert Polito Robert Polito

John Ashbery |Timothy Donnelly | Adam Fitzgerald - Moderated by Robert Polito

Thursday, September 19, 2013, 7 p.m.
Three generations of poets come together to trace the arc of modernism in poetry.
 
Carl Hiaasen Carl Hiaasen
Margaret Atwood Margaret Atwood

Margaret Atwood | Carl Hiaasen

Tuesday, September 17, 2013, 7 p.m.

SOLD OUT! 

To open the Fall 2013 season, Margaret Atwood, author of the Oryx and Crake trilogy, will be joined in conversation by novelist and columnist Carl Hiaasen, whose most recent work is the bestselling Bad Monkey.

Liao Yiwu Liao Yiwu
Wenguang Huang Wenguang Huang

Liao Yiwu in conversation with Paul Holdengräber

Thursday, June 13, 2013, 7 p.m.

Liao Yiwu sits down with Paul Holdengräber for a wide-ranging discussion of poetry, protest, and prison, interspersed by a musical performance on the xiao (Chinese flute) and a reading of his poem "Massacre". With the special participation of Wenguang Huang, Liao Yiwu's translator.

Toni Morrison Toni Morrison

Toni Morrison in conversation with Paul Holdengräber

Tuesday, June 11, 2013, 7 p.m.
Postponed - Due to unforseen circumstances, this event has been postponed and will be rescheduled. Ticket holders will be alerted with further details.
Tracy K. Smith Tracy K. Smith
Philip Levine Philip Levine
Paul Muldoon Paul Muldoon
Patti Smith Patti Smith
John Giorno John Giorno
Federico García Lorca Federico García Lorca
Will Keen Will Keen
María Fernández Ache María Fernández Ache
Christopher Maurer Christopher Maurer

Celebrating Federico García Lorca

Tuesday, June 4, 2013, 7 p.m.

To coincide with The New York Public Library's exhibition “Back Tomorrow: Federico Garcia Lorca / Poet in New York,” this special installment of LIVE from the NYPL celebrates Lorca's life and legacy with performances and readings. Participants include John Giorno, Will Keen and Maria Fernandez Ache, Philip Levine, Christopher Maurer, Paul Muldoon, Patti Smith, and Tracy K. Smith.

Dan Savage Dan Savage
Andrew Sullivan Andrew Sullivan

Dan Savage in Conversation with Andrew Sullivan

Tuesday, May 28, 2013, 7 p.m.

SOLD OUT!

Daniel Patterson Daniel Patterson
Alessandro Porcelli Alessandro Porcelli
David Chang David Chang
Massimo Bottura Massimo Bottura
Lisa Abend Lisa Abend

COOK IT RAW: DAVID CHANG & FRIENDS

Wednesday, May 22, 2013, 7 p.m.

In an evening inspired by the release of the book Cook it Raw, Momofuku's David Chang welcomes fellow chefs Massimo Bottura and Daniel Patterson for a conversation with Cook It Raw founder Alessandro Porcelli and moderated by journalist Lisa Abend.

Matthew Barney Matthew Barney

Matthew Barney in Conversation with Paul Holdengräber

Tuesday, May 21, 2013, 7 p.m.

From his earliest work, Matthew Barney has explored the transcendence of physical limitations within an interdisciplinary art practice. Even an examination of his work within one medium -- as is the case with Subliming Vessel: The Drawings of Matthew Barney, The Morgan Library & Museum's new exhibition devoted to the artist's works on paper and Rizzoli's new book by the same name  -- reveals the complexity of his creative vision.

Lynsey Addario Lynsey Addario
Zoltan Takacs Zoltan Takacs
James Nachtwey James Nachtwey
Ann Curry Ann Curry
Enric Sala Enric Sala

Risk Takers: National Geographic and the New Age of Exploration with Lynsey Addario, James Nachtwey, Dr. Enric Sala, Dr. Zoltan Takacs, and Ann Curry

Tuesday, May 14, 2013, 7 p.m.

In celebration of National Geographic’s 125th Anniversary theme, The New Age of Exploration, photographers and explorers reveal the physical, personal, and cultural perils involved in pushing the boundaries of discovery and bearing witness. The event will feature a discussion moderated by Ann Curry about the risks of documenting war, conflict, and human rights issues with award-winning National Geographic photojournalists Lynsey Addario and James Nachtwey as well as presentations from National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence Dr. Enric Sala, who is working protect marine ecosystems worldwide, and National Geographic Emerging Explorer Dr. Zoltan Takacs, a herpetologist/toxinologist who studies the healing potential of toxic venoms. 


Presented by RBC.
 



Carlos Slim Helú Carlos Slim Helú
Salman Khan Salman Khan
Dr. Anthony W. Marx Dr. Anthony W. Marx
Daniel Dennett Daniel Dennett
Jim Holt Jim Holt

DANIEL DENNETT & JIM HOLT

Wednesday, May 8, 2013, 7 p.m.

What methods can we use to answer life's most fundamental questions? In his book Intuition Pumps and Other Tools for Thinking, philosopher Daniel C. Dennett offers a cognitive toolbox filled with novel discussions of familiar moves—Occam’s Razor, reductio ad absurdum— and the “imagination extenders and focus-holders” that he and others have developed for dealing with the most treacherous subject matter: evolution, meaning, mind, and free will. He is joined in conversation by fellow philosopher Jim Holt, whose recent work Why Does the World Exist: An Existential Detective Story New York Magazine calls "a ridiculously good book about the world’s most intractable question." 

Junot Diaz Junot Diaz

JUNOT DÍAZ

Tuesday, April 30, 2013, 7 p.m.

SOLD OUT!

Andre Aciman Andre Aciman
Nicole Krauss Nicole Krauss

The Costs of Assimilation: André Aciman & Nicole Krauss

Monday, April 22, 2013, 7 p.m.

SOLD OUT!

William Gibson William Gibson

WILLIAM GIBSON

Friday, April 19, 2013, 7 p.m.

SOLD OUT!

Nathaniel Rich Nathaniel Rich
Slavoj Žižek Slavoj Žižek

Nathaniel Rich in Conversation with Slavoj Žižek: Worst-Case Scenarios

Monday, April 8, 2013, 7 p.m.
Postponed - Due to unforeseen circumstances, this event has been postponed and will be rescheduled. Ticket holders will be alerted with further details.

Philosopher Slavoj Žižek joins Nathaniel Rich for an exploration of worst-case scenarios, a subject at the heart of Rich's new novel Odds Against Tomorrow.

Madeleine Albright Madeleine Albright
Sandra Day O'Connor Sandra Day O'Connor
Anne-Marie Slaughter Anne-Marie Slaughter

Sandra Day O'Connor and Madeleine Albright in Conversation with Anne-Marie Slaughter

Thursday, March 28, 2013, 7 p.m.

SOLD OUT!

Tune in HERE for a live stream of the event. 

Anne Carson Anne Carson

ANNE CARSON

Tuesday, March 12, 2013, 7 p.m.

SOLD OUT!

ED RUSCHA

Wednesday, March 6, 2013, 7 p.m.

SOLD OUT!

Dick Cavett Dick Cavett
George Saunders George Saunders

GEORGE SAUNDERS & DICK CAVETT

Tuesday, February 26, 2013, 7 p.m.

SOLD OUT!

ADAM PHILLIPS & PAUL HOLDENGRÄBER

Monday, February 25, 2013, 7 p.m.

All of us lead two parallel lives: the one we are actively living, and the one we feel we should have had or might yet have. As hard as we try to exist in the moment, the unlived life is an inescapable presence, a shadow at our heels. And this itself can become the story of our lives: an elegy to unmet needs and sacrificed desires. We become haunted by the myth of our own potential, of what we have in ourselves to be or to do. And this can make of our lives a perpetual falling-short.

Daniel Kahneman Daniel Kahneman
Nassim Taleb Nassim Taleb

NASSIM TALEB & DANIEL KAHNEMAN

Tuesday, February 5, 2013, 7 p.m.

SOLD OUT!

Carlo Ginzburg Carlo Ginzburg

Being Jewish, Becoming Jewish: Carlo Ginzburg in conversation with Paul Holdengräber

Monday, February 4, 2013, 12 noon
In conversation with Paul Holdengräber, Carlo Ginzburg will discuss his ever-evolving relationship between Jewish, becoming Jewish, and his body of work.  
 
 
John Irving John Irving

Opening Night! JOHN IRVING

Tuesday, January 29, 2013, 7 p.m.

John Irving published his first novel, Setting Free The Bears, in 1968. More than four decades, twelve novels, five film adaptations, one Oscar, countless accolades and literary honors later, Irving is one of America's most treasured authors. His stories - from The World According to Garp, A Prayer for Owen Meany, The Cider House Rules, and his latest, In One Person - are filled with New England charm, compelling outsiders, and enduring characters. He begins LIVE from the NYPL's Spring 2013 season with his only New York appearance celebrating the paperback release of In One Person.

Chris Ware Chris Ware
Zadie Smith Zadie Smith
Marcus Samuelsson Marcus Samuelsson

Yes, Chef: MARCUS SAMUELSSON in conversation with Paul Holdengräber

Monday, December 10, 2012, 7 p.m.

Marcus Samuelsson was only three years old when he, his mother, and his sister—all battling tuberculosis—walked seventy-five miles to a hospital in the Ethiopian capital city of Addis Adaba. Tragically, his mother succumbed to the disease shortly after she arrived, but Marcus and his sister recovered, and one year later they were welcomed into a loving middle-class family in Göteborg, Sweden. It was there that his new grandmother Helga sparked in him a lifelong passion for food and cooking with her pan-fried herring, her freshly baked bread, and signature roast chicken. From that stage of his early life, there was little question what Marcus was going to become when he grew up. 

David Byrne David Byrne
Chris Ruen Chris Ruen
Darryl Pinckney Darryl Pinckney

Blacks in American Democracy: DARRYL PINCKNEY

Thursday, November 29, 2012, 7 p.m.

The Robert B. Silvers Lecture
This program is copresented with The Dorothy and Lewis B. Cullman Center for Scholars & Writers

Tom Wolfe Tom Wolfe

Back to Blood: TOM WOLFE in conversation with Paul Holdengräber

Wednesday, November 28, 2012, 7 p.m.
 

SOLD OUT!

 
Andrew Solomon Andrew Solomon

Far from the Tree: ANDREW SOLOMON in conversation with Paul Holdengräber

Monday, November 12, 2012, 7 p.m.

As a gay child of straight parents, Andrew Solomon was born with a sexual orientation that was considered an illness, but it became a cornerstone of his identity. As a journalist reporting on the growth of Deaf Pride in the 1990s, he began to consider illness and identity as a continuum with shifting boundaries. He saw the communities with such "horizontal identities," spurred by the disability-rights movement and empowered by the Internet, were and are challenging the societal expectations and the norms surrounding identity.

Damien Echols Damien Echols
Henry Rollins Henry Rollins

Life After Death: DAMIEN ECHOLS in conversation with HENRY ROLLINS

Wednesday, November 7, 2012, 7 p.m.

In 1993, then 18-year-old Damien Echols was arrested along with fellow teenagers Jason Baldwin and Jessie Misskelley, Jr. and charged with the murders of three eight-year-old boys in West Memphis, Arkansas. As the supposed “ringleader” of the group, Echols was sentenced to death, while Baldwin and Misskelley were given life sentences. The convicted men, known as the West Memphis Three, ultimately became part of one of the most notorious cases of wrongful conviction in recent history.

Carlos Slim Helú Carlos Slim Helú
Salman Khan Salman Khan
Joel Klein Joel Klein

The One World Schoolhouse: SALMAN KHAN & CARLOS SLIM in conversation with JOEL KLEIN

Friday, November 2, 2012, 7 p.m.

How can we improve our schools for the 21st century?   

Don DeLillo Don DeLillo
Jonathan Franzen Jonathan Franzen

The Angel Esmeralda: DON DELILLO in conversation with JONATHAN FRANZEN

Wednesday, October 24, 2012, 7 p.m.

SOLD OUT!

Katie Roiphe Katie Roiphe

In Praise of Messy Lives: KATIE ROIPHE in conversation with Paul Holdengräber

Wednesday, October 10, 2012, 7 p.m.

“It seems that some of us are so busy channeling our energies into doing what is good for us, for our children, into responsible and improving endeavors, that we may have forgotten, somewhere in the harried trips to Express Yourself Through Theater or Trader Joe’s, to seize the day. Of course, people still have hangovers and affairs, but what dominates the wholesome vista is a sense that everything we do should be productive, should be moving toward a sane and balanced end, toward the dubious and fragile illusion of ‘healthy.’ The idea that you would do something just for the momentary blissful escape of it, for intensity, for strong feeling, is out of fashion.”
--Katie Roiphe, In Praise of Messy Lives

Pete Townshend Pete Townshend

Who Is He? PETE TOWNSHEND in conversation with Paul Holdengräber

Monday, October 8, 2012, 7:30 p.m.

SOLD OUT!

In Who I Am, Pete Townshend—guitarist, songwriter, singer and founding member of The Who—at last tells his story. 

Steven Johnson Steven Johnson
Sherry Turkle Sherry Turkle

Is Technology Progressive? STEVEN JOHNSON in conversation with SHERRY TURKLE

Wednesday, October 3, 2012, 7 p.m.
In his new book Future Perfect, popular author and media theorist Steven Johnson argues that a new model of political change is on the rise, transforming everything from local governments to classrooms, from protest movements to health care. Johnson paints a compelling portrait of this new political worldview—influenced by the success and interconnectedness of the Internet, but not dependent on high-tech solutions—that breaks with the conventional categories of liberal or conservative thinking. Future Perfect makes the case that progress is still possible, and that new solutions are on the rise.
Cheryl Strayed Cheryl Strayed

Sugar Gone Wild: CHERYL STRAYED in conversation with Paul Holdengräber

Tuesday, October 2, 2012, 7 p.m.
“I’d finally been able to give it because I’d let go of all the grandiose ideas I’d once had about myself and my writing—so talented! so young! I’d stopped being grandiose. I’d lowered myself to the notion that the absolute only thing that mattered was getting that extra beating heart out of my chest. Which meant I had to write my book. My very possibly mediocre book. My very possibly never-going-to-be-published book. My absolutely no-where-in-league-with-the-writers-I’d-admired-so-much-that-I-practically-memorized-their-sentences book. It was only then, when I humbly surrendered, that I was able to do the work I needed to do.
Paul Auster Paul Auster

Winter Journal: PAUL AUSTER in conversation with Paul Holdengräber

Monday, October 1, 2012, 7 p.m.

 “Speak now before it is too late, and then hope to go on speaking until there is nothing more to be said. Time is running out, after all. Perhaps it is just as well to put aside your stories for now and try to examine what it has felt like to live inside this body from the first day you can remember being alive until this one. A catalogue of sensory data. What one might call a phenomenology of breathing.”
--Paul Auster, Winter Journal

Salman Rushdie Salman Rushdie

OPENING NIGHT! From Fatwa to Freedom: SALMAN RUSHDIE in conversation with Paul Holdengräber: FREE EVENT!

Thursday, September 20, 2012, 7 p.m.

The Richard B. Salomon Distinguished Lecture

SOLD OUT!

Trevor Paglen Trevor Paglen

Creative Time & LIVE from the NYPL present THE LAST PICTURES

Wednesday, September 19, 2012, 7 p.m.

On Wednesday, September 19, join artist and geographer Trevor Paglen, filmmaker Werner Herzog, and Pulitzer Prize-winning poet Tracy K. Smith for a special evening under the stars in New York's Bryant Park.  This event, co-presented by Creative Time and LIVE from the NYPL, will feature a reading by Smith; Herzog and Paglen in conversation about cultural artifacts, space exploration, and the legacy of human civilization; and a presentation of the images included in The Last Pictures--a golden disc of images created by Paglen, to be launched into outer space attached to the exterior of communications satellite EchoStar XVI. Telescopes will also be provided for viewing the night sky by the Amateur Astronomers Association of New York. The event is free and open to the public on a first-come, first-served basis.

Elizabeth Gilbert Elizabeth Gilbert
John Hodgman John Hodgman

Pray, Love, and especially EAT: JOHN HODGMAN in conversation with ELIZABETH GILBERT

Tuesday, May 22, 2012, 7 p.m.

 CALF'S BRAINS WITH BLACK BUTTER 
"Allow 1 set of brains--or more, for true addicts--for each serving. Soak the brains in cold water for 1 hour or so and drain. Add 1 sliced onion, a bit of chopped parsley and celery, 1 tablespoon of salt, and 1/2 cup of vinegar to enough boiling water to cover the brains, and simmer them gently for 1/2 hour. Drain and when cool tenderly remove the skin and any bits of bone the butcher may have left clinging to their surface. For each 2 sets of brains melt 1/2 cup of butter (or as much more as can be spared) in a shallow pan and allow it to brown slightly...." 

--From At Home on the Range


Van Cliburn Van Cliburn

LIVE from the NYPL & Christie's present: VAN CLIBURN in conversation with Paul Holdengräber

Tuesday, May 15, 2012, 7 p.m.

LIVE from the NYPL & Christie's present

Jesmyn Ward Jesmyn Ward

JESMYN WARD: SALVAGE THE BONES

Tuesday, May 1, 2012, 7 p.m.
“There is something about living through Katrina and hardship that refines who people are, I think, that showcases their most essential selves. I hope that my fiction wrestles with Faulkner’s eternal question, ‘the problem of the human heart in conflict with itself,’ and that my work realizes the essential selves of my characters and those that live on the Mississippi Gulf Coast.”
--Jesmyn Ward

Slavoj Žižek Slavoj Žižek

SLAVOJ ZIZEK IS BACK with 2011: THE YEAR OF DREAMING DANGEROUSLY

Wednesday, April 25, 2012, 7 p.m.
 

SOLD OUT!

 
 
E.O. Wilson E.O. Wilson

E. O. WILSON: THE SOCIAL CONQUEST OF EARTH

Tuesday, April 10, 2012, 7 p.m.

SOLD OUT!

Claude Lanzmann Claude Lanzmann

CLAUDE LANZMANN: Shoah and My Life, a conversation with Paul Holdengräber

Wednesday, March 21, 2012, 7 p.m.

Shoah and My Life

Jean-Jacques Rousseau Jean-Jacques Rousseau

OCCUPY ROUSSEAU: INEQUALITY AND SOCIAL JUSTICE

Friday, March 9, 2012, 7 p.m.

WHAT WOULD JEAN-JACQUES ROUSSEAU SAY ABOUT OUR DEMOCRACIES IF HE WERE AMONG US TODAY?

Sharifa Rhodes-Pitts Sharifa Rhodes-Pitts
Claire Barliant Claire Barliant
Simone Leigh Simone Leigh
Werner Herzog Werner Herzog

WERNER HERZOG: DEATH ROW & Other Journeys, a conversation with Paul Holdengräber

Wednesday, February 29, 2012, 7 p.m.

SOLD OUT! Buy tickets to simulcast...

Paul Holdengräber Paul Holdengräber
Pico Iyer Pico Iyer

PICO IYER in conversation with Paul Holdengräber

Tuesday, February 7, 2012, 7 p.m.

THE MAN WITHIN MY HEAD: On GRAHAM GREENE & Other Elective Affinities.

John Irving John Irving

Opening Night! JOHN IRVING

Sunday, January 29, 2012, 7 p.m.

The award-winning novelist will discuss his latest work, In One Person.

 
 

FRIENDS of the NYPL receive discounted tickets and special pre-sales to LIVE events

LIVE from the NYPL is made possible with generous support from Celeste Bartos, Mahnaz Ispahani Bartos and Adam Bartos, and the Margaret and Herman Sokol Public Education Endowment Fund.
Oliver Stone Oliver Stone
Tariq Ali Tariq Ali

OPENING NIGHT! OLIVER STONE and TARIQ ALI: On History

Thursday, January 19, 2012, 7 p.m.

ON HISTORY

JOSH RITTER, WESLEY STACE & STEVE EARLE

Tuesday, December 6, 2011, 7 p.m.

SINGERS, SONGS, WRITERS

Steve Earle, Wesley Stace (John Wesley Harding) & Josh Ritter

Three of the best reviewed novels of the year were written by musicians: Steve Earle's I'll Never Get Out Of This World Alive, Wesley Stace's  (AKA John Wesley Harding) Charles Jessold, Considered as a Murderer and Josh Ritter's Bright's Passage. What's happening here? How do music and fiction inspire each other? Where do they find the time? The three author/musicians join up for a night of talk and songs.

LIVE from the NYPL is made possible with generous support from Celeste Bartos, Mahnaz Ispahani Bartos and Adam Bartos, and the Margaret and Herman Sokol Public Education Endowment Fund.

 

MARY BEARD

Wednesday, November 30, 2011, 7 p.m.

The Robert B. Silvers Lecture

Classicist Mary Beard asks Do the Classics Have a Future?  Beard is famous for her scholarly distinction and ability to energize academic and non-academic audiences alike. In addition to her column with the Times, she regularly appears on television. Her commentary is praised for its wit and inventiveness as much as for its intellectual sophistication.

JOAN DIDION in conversation with Sloane Crosley

Monday, November 21, 2011, 7 p.m.

SOLD OUT!

"When we talk about mortality, we are talking about our children." --Joan Didion, Blue Nights

DIANE KEATON

Monday, November 14, 2011, 7 p.m.

SOLD OUT!

We know Diane Keaton as the respected actress who played iconic roles in legendary movies, most memorably as the title character in Woody Allen’s Annie Hall. A trend-setting symbol of late 70s New York, Keaton has also set the standard for California interior design. All of which seems to come effortlessly to Keaton; in her new memoir, Then Again, we may get an idea why. The book focuses on the actress’ relationship with her mother, Dorothy Hall, an artist and a writer. Join us as Keaton takes the stage to read from Then Again.

Nicholas Hlobo Nicholas Hlobo
Ben Frost Ben Frost
Lee Serle Lee Serle

ROLEX ARTS WEEKEND: P.O.V choreographed by LEE SERLE (World Premiere) BEN FROST’S Music For 6 Guitars (U.S. Premiere), introduced by BRIAN ENO

Sunday, November 13, 2011, 7:30 p.m.

SOLD OUT!

LIVE from the NYPL presents ROLEX ARTS WEEKEND

The culmination of LIVE from the NYPL presents Rolex Arts Weekend is a two-part event featuring the work of Protégé in Dance Lee Serle and Protégé in Music Ben Frost, performing in two of the grandest spaces in the Stephen A. Schwarzman Building, the New York Public Library’s main branch. Seating is limited for these one-time-only performances.

Maya Zbib Maya Zbib

ROLEX ARTS WEEKEND: MAYA ZBIB's The Music Box (U.S. premiere), introduced by Peter Sellars

Sunday, November 13, 2011, 3:30 p.m.

SOLD OUT!

LIVE from the NYPL presents ROLEX ARTS WEEKEND 

Brian Eno Brian Eno
Anish Kapoor Anish Kapoor
Peter Sellars Peter Sellars

ROLEX ARTS WEEKEND: BRIAN ENO, ANISH KAPOOR, and PETER SELLARS in conversation with Paul Holdengraber

Sunday, November 13, 2011, 1 p.m.

SOLD OUT!

LIVE from the NYPL presents ROLEX ARTS WEEKEND

In a rare event featuring three of today’s most significant artists, Paul Holdengräber convenes composer Brian Eno, visual artist Anish Kapoor and theatre/opera director Peter Sellars—mentors to Ben Frost in Music, Nicholas Hlobo in Visual Arts, and Maya Zbib in Theatre, respectively—for a wide-ranging discussion.

 

 

Jose Van Dam Jose Van Dam
Osvaldo Golijov Osvaldo Golijov

ROLEX ARTS WEEKEND: JOSÉ VAN DAM and OSVALDO GOLIJOV in conversation with Paul Holdengraber

Saturday, November 12, 2011, 7 p.m.

LIVE from the NYPL presents ROLEX ARTS WEEKEND

Belgian opera star José Van Dam and award-winning Argentine classical composer Osvaldo Golijov, both advisors to the Rolex Mentor and Protégé Arts Initiative, join Paul Holdengräber to discuss their lives and work.

Tracy K. Smith and Hans Magnus Enzensberger Tracy K. Smith and Hans Magnus Enzensberger

ROLEX ARTS WEEKEND: TRACY K. SMITH and HANS MAGNUS ENZENSBERGER: Poems Set to Music

Saturday, November 12, 2011, 5 p.m.

SOLD OUT!

LIVE from the NYPL presents ROLEX ARTS WEEKEND

Protégée in Literature Tracy K. Smith has commissioned composer Gregory Spears to set to music two poems – her own Savior Machine; and The Feast of Flowers, by her mentor, Hans Magnus Enzensberger. Soprano Jolle Greenleaf and another vocalist will perform the poems, accompanied by Spears on piano. Smith and Enzensberger will introduce the performance and discuss their work.

Danny Glover Danny Glover
Annemarie Jacir Annemarie Jacir
Peter Scarlet Peter Scarlet

ROLEX ARTS WEEKEND: ANNEMARIE JACIR, DANNY GLOVER, PETER SCARLET, and others

Saturday, November 12, 2011, 3 p.m.

LIVE from the NYPL presents ROLEX ARTS WEEKEND

Protégée in Film Annemarie Jacir speaks with a panel of film industry luminaries and colleagues who are linked to her work, including Danny Glover, who is producing her current film, and Peter Scarlet, Executive Director of the Abu Dhabi Film Festival, where Jacir has served on the jury.

Jessye Norman Jessye Norman

ROLEX ARTS WEEKEND: JESSYE NORMAN in conversation with Paul Holdengraber

Friday, November 11, 2011, 7 p.m.

LIVE from the NYPL presents ROLEX ARTS WEEKEND

A one-on-one discussion with iconic dramatic soprano Jessye Norman. Among the most celebrated singers of her generation, Jessye Norman has played, to great acclaim, the roles of Aida, Cassandre, Alceste, and Leonore. She is also known for her commitment to philanthropy and to arts in education; She was Rolex Mentor in Music from 2004-2005 and is a member of the Board of Trustees of the NYPL.

ROLEX ARTS WEEKEND: GILBERTO GIL in conversation with Paul Holdengraber

Thursday, November 10, 2011, 7 p.m.

LIVE from the NYPL presents ROLEX ARTS WEEKEND

The musician Gilberto Gil has engineered a unique sound that combines traditional Brazilian genres such as samba, salsa, and bossa nova with Western influences in the forms of rock and folk music. He was a leader of the tropicalia movement in Brazil during the late sixties, and has since become one of South America’s most widely-recognized musicians. Gil is accomplished as a singer, composer and guitar-player and continues to perform all over the world. More recently, Gil has enjoyed a career as a politician in Brazil, serving as Minister of Culture in Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva’s government from 2003-2008.

GILBERTO GIL was a leader of the tropicalia movement in Brazil during the late sixties. He has become one of South America’s most widely-recognized musicians. He is accomplished as a singer, composer and guitar-player and continues to perform.

UMBERTO ECO in conversation with Paul Holdengraber

Tuesday, November 8, 2011, 7 p.m.

SOLD OUT!

"I am expecting two kinds of readers. The first has no idea that all these things really happened, knows nothing about nineteenth-century literature...The second, however, knows or senses that I am recounting things that really happened." --Umberto Eco on The Prague Cemetery

ERROL MORRIS in conversation with Paul Holdengraber

Wednesday, November 2, 2011, 7 p.m.

"The essays in this book should be seen as a collection of mystery stories. Imagine finding a trunk in an attic filled with photographs. With each photograph we are thrown into an investigation. Who are these people? Why was their photograph taken? What were they thinking? What can they tell us about ourselves? What can we learn about the photographer and his motivations? Each of these questions can lead us on a winding, circuitous path. An excursion into the labyrinth of the past and into the fabric of reality." 
--Errol Morris

In Believing is Seeing, Errol Morris goes behind and beyond the photographer’s lens. He presents readers with an image, or series of images, then seeks out the true relationship between the photographs and the real world they supposedly record.

TOM BROKAW in conversation with Paul Holdengraber

Tuesday, November 1, 2011, 7 p.m.

Tom Brokaw achieved national recognition as the anchor of NBC’s Nightly News during the mid-eighties. He performed the role for over two decades. Brokaw made a name as NBC’s White House correspondent, reporting during the Watergate scandal. His work at NBC is characterized by a combination of his reporting skills and his assured delivery as a presenter. He has created highly-acclaimed documentaries on subjects as diverse as baseball and racial separation in suburban America. Brokaw is the author of five bestselling books. His new work, The Time of Our Lives: A Conversation about America, is an investigation into how America can rejuvenate and restore its influence on global affairs. Brokaw’s work has won him several awards, including a Peabody.

George Prochnik George Prochnik
Simon Sebag Montefiore Simon Sebag Montefiore

SIMON SEBAG MONTEFIORE in conversation with George Prochnik

Saturday, October 29, 2011, 7 p.m.

“Why Jerusalem?”
Exploring Jerusalem’s hold over the imagination and politics of the world


Joy Gottesman Ungerleider Lecture, 2011

WALLS & BRIDGES

Wednesday, October 26, 2011, 7 p.m.
Canceled

Inspired by Isaac Newton's observation that "We build too many walls and not enough bridges", Walls and Bridges is a 10-day series of performances and critical explorations uniting French and American thinkers and performers from the social sciences, philosophy and live arts.  The festival, as a whole, has been curated by the Villa Gillet and presented by France's Conseil de la création artistique. 

DEF JAM with RUSSELL SIMMONS & RICK RUBIN in conversation with Paul Holdengraber

Friday, October 14, 2011, 7 p.m.

SOLD OUT!

Def Jam Recordings is a comprehensive history of the first major hip-hop label. Founded by Russell ‘Rush’ Simmons and Rick Rubin in 1984, the label’s first office was Rubin’s NYU dorm room. Def Jam led the way in transforming hip-hop from a projects-based art form to a popular phenomenon. Def Jam is responsible for launching and sustaining the careers of musicians such as Jay-Z, LL Cool J, Run-DMC, Public Enemy and The Beastie Boys. Both Simmons and Rubin have now left Def Jam to pursue successful careers in and away from music; but their creative legacy remains at the heart of the label's modern-day identity. 

HARRY BELAFONTE in conversation with Paul Holdengraber

Wednesday, October 12, 2011, 7 p.m.

In his new memoir, My Song, Harry Belafonte traces his journey from Jamaica and Harlem to the world stage. After finding success as a singer and actor, Belafonte became a powerful force in the American Civil Rights movement. In his memoir, the chart-topping singer discusses his friendship with figures including Martin Luther King, Jr., John F. Kennedy, Nelson Mandela, and Marlon Brando. In conversation with Paul Holdengraber on October 12th, Belafonte will reflect on his long and illustrious career.

HARRY BELAFONTE's l956 album Calypso made him the first artist in history to sell more than one million LPs. He has won both a Tony award and an Emmy, and he was awarded the National Medal of Arts by President Clinton. He has served as a UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador and is the recipient of Kennedy Center Honors for excellence in the performing arts. He currently resides in New York City with his wife, Pamela.

JOHN LITHGOW in conversation with Bill Moyers

Tuesday, October 11, 2011, 7 p.m.

John Lithgow is among the most distinguished American actors of his generation. He has received numerous awards, including five Emmys and two Golden Globes. The multi-talented thespian is also the author of eight children’s books and an anthology of poems. Now Lithgow has poured his creative energy into a memoir, which follows the twists of his career up to his success in the 1980s. Drama: An Actor’s Education recalls John Lithgow’s itinerant youth, his studies at Harvard (where he graduated magna cum laude), and his first flush of success, during which he performed alongside Meryl Streep, Bob Fosse, and Brian De Palma. At the heart of Drama is Lithgow’s relationship with his father, Arthur – an actor, producer and director, whose love of Shakespeare infected his son.

This program is copresented with The Dorothy and Lewis B. Cullman Center for Scholars & Writers

EDMUND DE WAAL in conversation with Paul Holdengraber

Monday, October 3, 2011, 7 p.m.

SOLD OUT!

In The Hare with Amber Eyes: An Inheritance, acclaimed potter Edmund de Waal traces the history of his paternal grandmother’s family - the Jewish Ephrussi banking dynasty. With the grace of a novelist, de Waal navigates the sets of prejudices faced by each generation of the illustrious Ephrussi clan. The central thread for de Waal’s narrative is an heirloom of Japanese netsuke. Considering this collection of miniatures partly as a prism, de Waal’s offers an inspiring response to the turmoil of early twentieth century Europe.

ROBERT WILSON with RUFUS WAINWRIGHT, LOU REED, LUCINDA CHILDS

Friday, September 30, 2011, 7 p.m.

ON ARTISTIC COLLABORATION

Robert Wilson is among the most distinguished theater directors of our time. Creator of such works as The King of Spain and The Life and Times of Sigmund Freud, Wilson has also collaborated with Philip Glass on the hugely successful opera Einstein on the Beach. Today Wilson’s accomplishments are recognized not only in the spheres of theatre and opera, but also in the visual arts. Retrospectives of his work have been held throughout the world, and his installations have appeared in several Guggenheim museums, among other venues.

Joining him on stage to celebrate his 70th birthday are LOU REED, RUFUS WAINWRIGHT and LUCINDA CHILDS.

ARIEL DORFMAN in conversation with Paul Holdengraber

Monday, September 26, 2011, 7 p.m.

Ariel Dorfman discusses his time as an exile from Pinochet's Chile in his memoir Feeding on Dreams.

ARIEL DORFMAN’s many internationally acclaimed works of poetry, fiction, and nonfiction include his memoir Heading South, Looking North, which was the basis for the documentary film A Promise to the Dead, directed by Peter Raymont and shortlisted for an Academy Award in 2008. His play Death and the Maiden has been staged in more than a hundred countries.

PAUL HOLDENGRÄBER is the director of LIVE from the NYPL.

STACY SCHIFF in conversation with Amanda Foreman

Friday, September 23, 2011, 7 p.m.

The distinguished biographer, Pulitzer Prize winner and former Cullman Center Fellow Stacy Schiff discusses her highly acclaimed biography Cleopatra.

This program is copresented with The Dorothy and Lewis B. Cullman Center for Scholars & Writers

STACY SCHIFF is also the author of Véra (Mrs. Vladimir Nabokov), winner of the Pulitzer Prize; Saint-Exupéry, a Pulitzer Prize finalist; and A Great Improvisation: Franklin, France, and the Birth of America, winner of the George Washington Book Prize. Schiff has received fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation and the National Endowment for the Humanities, and has contributed frequently to the New York Times op-ed page. She lives in New York City.

OPENING NIGHT! Introducing SHEA HEMBREY

Tuesday, September 20, 2011, 7 p.m.

Shea Hembrey's spellbinding biennial, Seek, showcases 100 artists from around the world, all of whom were imagined by Hembrey himself.

SHEA HEMBREY grew up in rural Hickory Grove, Arkansas in a family of farmers, factory workers, hunters, trappers, musicians, and cockfighters. Though he has developed the majority of his craftmanship skills on his own, he has a varied formal art education, including an MFA from Cornell University and a year studying Maori art in New Zealand. His studio is now based in a sleepy town in New Jersey.

Go the F**k to Sleep: A Bedtime Book for Parents Who Live in the Real World

Tuesday, June 14, 2011, 7 p.m.

Go the F**k to Sleep, a pants-wettingly funny bedtime book for parents, has received an extraordinary amount of pre-publication attention from parents around the world. As Peter Maravelis of City Lights Bookstore in San Francisco told the New York Times: “It’s the zeitgeist.”

Go the F**k to Sleep author Adam Mansbach, illustrator Ricardo Cortés, and Special Guests in conversation with Paul Holdengräber on Children, Sleep Deprivation and Insomnia.

ADAM MANSBACH novels include The End of the Jews, winner of the California Book Award, and the best-selling Angry Black White Boy, a San Francisco Chronicle Best Book of 2005. His fiction and essays have appeared in the New York Times Book Review, the Believer, Granta, the Los Angeles Times, and many other publications. He is the 2010-2011 New Voices Professor of Fiction at Rutgers University. His daughter, Vivien, is three.

CHRIS BLACKWELL CHRIS BLACKWELL

CHRIS BLACKWELL in conversation with Paul Holdengraber

Wednesday, May 11, 2011, 7 - 8:30 p.m.

In 1959 Chris Blackwell founded Island Records in a small office in Kingston, Jamaica in an effort to bring Jamaican music to the broader stage.  After moving the offices to the UK, Island Records sought out talent from various musical genres.  The company has been one of the most important labels in the music industry and the force behind some of the top era-defining acts like Bob Marley and the Wailers, U2, Roxy Music, Tom Waits, Eric B and Rakim, Tricky, Grace Jones, Amy Winehouse, Keane, and numerous others.  In celebration of the company’s fiftieth anniversary, Rizzoli in collaboration with Island Trading Co. present a comprehensive retrospective of the people and artists behind the label in The Story of Island Records: Keep on Running. 

ElIZABETH GILBERT ElIZABETH GILBERT
PAUL HOLDENGRABER PAUL HOLDENGRABER

ELIZABETH GILBERT in conversation with Paul Holdengraber

Thursday, May 5, 2011, 7 - 8:30 p.m.

A few months ago, two prominent American professors of philosophy -- Hubert Dreyfus and Sean Dorrance Kelly -- published a book called All Things Shining: Reading the Western Classics to Find Meaning in a Secular Age.  It's a populist volume, advising the reader quite simply, on How To Live.

Elizabeth Gilbert was surprised when she read a review of the book in the New York Times, as well as intrigued reading the book now to see that the authors spend a fair bit of time  comparing her to David Foster Wallace.

Dreyfus and Dorrance admire both of these contemporary writers, who, according to them, created strong voices on the page, both battled depression, Gilbert became a global symbol of stubborn good cheer. Both authors found themselves placed in an unexpected spotlight of fame and vast public expectation.

On May 5th, Elizabeth Gilbert will be in conversation with Paul Holdengräber to speak in public for the last time about her "Eat, Pray, Love" journey before retiring to a quieter life of, as she puts it, "working on slow fiction and even slower gardening."

RALPH NADER RALPH NADER
TED TURNER TED TURNER
PETER LEWIS PETER LEWIS

RALPH NADER, TED TURNER & PETER LEWIS

Wednesday, May 4, 2011, 7 - 8:30 p.m.

In Only the Super-Rich Can Save Us!, Ralph Nader imagines a coalition of billionaires who join forces to answer the question: “What if several of America’s wealthiest individuals decided it was time to work for the collective good?”

On May 4th, two billionaires, Ted Turner and Peter Lewis, portrayed in the fictional narrative will appear on the stage in real life for a taboo-free exchange with the author. 

The two "billionaires against bull" as Ralph Nader charaterizes them, and  one of America's leading provocateur will envision how philanthropy can spark key redirections of our society, our country, and the world.

Wole Soyinka Wole Soyinka

PEN American Center presents WOLE SOYINKA

Sunday, May 1, 2011, 6 p.m.

ARTHUR MILLER LECTURE: WOLE SOYINKA

Winner of Nobel Prize in Literature, Nigerian poet-dramatist Wole Soyinka writes, "Books and all forms of writing are terror to those who wish to suppress the truth." Join him for a thoughtful examination of censorship--and a writer's purpose and responsibility in a climate of forced silences and intolerance.

HAROLD BLOOM HAROLD BLOOM
PAUL HOLDENGRABER PAUL HOLDENGRABER

PEN American Center presents HAROLD BLOOM: From The Anxiety to The Anatomy of Influence

Sunday, May 1, 2011, 3 p.m.

"Literature for me is not merely the best part of life; it is itself the form of life, which has no other form."
--Harold Bloom, The Anatomy of Influence.

On the closing day of the PEN World Voices Festival,  HAROLD BLOOM, the Yale University’s Sterling Professor the Humanities, will join Paul Holdengraber for a discussion LIVE from the NYPL. Now in his eighth decade, Bloom will reflect back on his life-long love affair with literature. In a far-ranging conversation, Bloom with revisit his classic work of literary criticism The Anxiety of Influence. Bloom will also discuss Till I End My Song, his recently published gathering of last poems, and his career-spanning "critical self-portrait" The Anatomy of Influence.

JONATHAN GALASSI JONATHAN GALASSI
JOACHIM SARTORIUS JOACHIM SARTORIUS
Rosanna Warren Rosanna Warren

PEN American Center presents JONATHAN GALASSI

Sunday, May 1, 2011, 1 p.m.

President of the venerable publishing house, Farrar, Strauss and Giroux, Jonathan Galassi goes head-to-head with the illustrious German poet-translator and artistic director of Germany's acclaimed Berliner Festspiele Joachim Sartorius. Sartorius was awarded the Paul Scheebart Prize for his translations of contemporary American poetry in 1998 and elected fellow of the German Academy for Language and Literature in 2002. Together, with American poet Rosanna Warren, they discuss the fine nuances of translation and poetry.

Bruno Racine Bruno Racine
Paul LeClerc Paul LeClerc

THE FUTURE OF LIBRARIES: BRUNO RACINE & PAUL LECLERC, moderated by Paul Holdengräber

Friday, April 29, 2011, 7 - 8:30 p.m.

Paul LeClerc, a scholar of the French Enlightenment, will be retiring in June 2011 from his position as president of the New York Public Library, where he has served admirably since 1993. To mark this occasion, Paul LeClerc is joined by Bruno Racine, president of the Bibliothèque Nationale de France, for a wide-ranging conversation about the future of libraries in the digital age moderated by Paul Holdengräber.

This event is co-sponsored by the Maison Française of Columbia University.

ATUL GAWANDE ATUL GAWANDE

ATUL GAWANDE in conversation with Paul Holdengraber

Thursday, April 28, 2011, 7 - 8:30 p.m.

Being Mortal, and other tragedies.

Why modern medicine so often fails people facing the end of their lives; how America can have better; and other discussions with a medical writer.

JENNIFER EGAN in conversation with Laura Miller

Thursday, April 14, 2011, 7 - 8:30 p.m.

Jennifer Egan’s spellbinding interlocking narratives circle the lives of Bennie Salazar, an aging former punk rocker and record executive, and Sasha, the passionate, troubled young woman he employs. Although Bennie and Sasha never discover each other’s pasts, the reader does, in intimate detail, along with the secret lives of a host of other characters whose paths intersect with theirs, over many years, in locales as varied as New York, San Francisco, Naples, and Africa.

This program is copresented with The Dorothy and Lewis B. Cullman Center for Scholars & Writers

HOWARD JACOBSON HOWARD JACOBSON

HOWARD JACOBSON in conversation with Paul Holdengraber

Friday, April 1, 2011, 7 - 8:30 p.m.

When Howard Jacobson won the Man Booker prize for The Finkler Question last autumn it was hailed as a victory for the comic novel.  'Except that I write tragic novels,' Jacobson declared.  But he  is nonetheless gratified that Jonathan Safran Foer said of him 'I don't know a funnier writer alive.'  Being funny should go without saying if you're a novelist, Jacobson insists. In conversation with Paul Holdengräber, Howard Jacobson will discuss why any novelist who doesn't make you laugh is short-changing you.

A.B. YEHOSHUA A.B. YEHOSHUA
PAUL HOLDENGRABER PAUL HOLDENGRABER

A.B. YEHOSHUA in conversation with Paul Holdengraber

Monday, March 28, 2011, 7 - 8:30 p.m.

The author of nine novels, three short-story collections, four plays, and four books of essays, A.B. Yehoshua has been described as “one of Israel’s world-class writers” by Saul Bellow.

In a far-ranging conversation with Paul Holdengräber,  A.B. Yehoshua  will look back on his career, with a particular emphasis on a superb collection of literary essays entitled "The Terrible Power of a Minor Guilt." Yehoshua will explain why we must pay close attention to the moral and ethical aspects of written texts, why in his view Literature MUST take back the authority of Morality it has forsaken, as well as address issues pertaining to Zionism, Diaspora, and Jewish Identity. Yehoshua will also discuss the recent adaptation of his novel the "A Woman in Jerusalem"  just released in the United States as a feature film and entitled "The Human Resources Manager."

This program is supported by the Office of Cultural Affairs, Consulate General of Israel in New York

DAVID BROOKS DAVID BROOKS

DAVID BROOKS, The Social Animal: The Hidden Sources of Love, Character and Achievement

Monday, March 7, 2011, 7 - 8:30 p.m.

David Brooks, the New York Times columnist and bestselling author of Bobos in Paradise, has long explored and explained the way we live. Now, Brooks turns to the building blocks of human flourishing in a multilayered, illuminating work grounded in everyday life. 

Mark Salzman Mark Salzman

MARK SALZMAN: An Atheist in Free Fall

Friday, February 18, 2011, 7 - 8:30 p.m.

Author Mark Salzman (Iron and Silk, The Soloist, Lying Awake), became a stay-at-home parent in 2001.

Eight years and three failed book manuscripts later, he had a nervous breakdown. He joins LIVE to tell a sad story with a happy ending and to explore:

•What kind of person gets panic attacks when he meditates?

•Can an atheist have a mystical experience?

•Is free will a necessary illusion?

•Do dogs bark on purpose?

•Where does faith fit in?

This program is sponsored by the Carnegie Corporation of New York.

WENDY KOPP WENDY KOPP
MALCOLM GLADWELL MALCOLM GLADWELL

WENDY KOPP & MALCOLM GLADWELL"Teach For America" Revolution: A Catalyst for Education Reform?

Tuesday, February 8, 2011, 7 - 8:30 p.m.

As Teach For America’s founder and leader for twenty years, Wendy Kopp has developed a clear, and to some surprising, perspective on what it will take to realize our nation’s vision of educational excellence and equity for all children. As laid out in her new book, A Chance to Make History: What Works and What Doesn’t in Providing an Excellent Education For All, Wendy Kopp’s experiences with tens of thousands of teachers and other leaders in urban and rural communities has deepened her conviction that we can accomplish something unprecedented in our nation’s history and unprecedented around the world – we can provide children facing the socioeconomic challenges that come along with growing up in low-income urban and rural communities with an education that transforms their life prospects.

COLM TOIBIN COLM TOIBIN
Paul Holdengraber Paul Holdengraber

COLM TOIBIN: The Empty Family, A converation with Paul Holdengraber

Thursday, February 3, 2011, 7 - 8:30 p.m.

This program is co-presented with The Dorothy and Lewis B. Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers.

Colm Tóibín’s new collection of short stories, The Empty Family, demonstrates a profound understanding of human fragility and resilience – and the price we pay for both.

In "Two Women," a brief encounter reminds a formidable woman of her long-lost lover. In "Silence," Tóibín revisits one of his favorite subjects, Henry James, who appears in this story at the same table as Lady Gregory. In "The Street," Tóibín recounts a secret gay love affair between two Pakistani workers in Spain – both lonely in their adopted country, and both longing for a human connection far from home.

MAIRA KALMAN MAIRA KALMAN
DANIEL HANDLER DANIEL HANDLER
BARBARA CASSIN BARBARA CASSIN
SOPHIE WAHNICH SOPHIE WAHNICH
PAUL HOLDENGRABER PAUL HOLDENGRABER

W & B FESTIVAL: AND THE PURSUIT OF HAPPINESS

Saturday, January 29, 2011, 7:30 - 9 p.m.
Maira Kalman, Daniel Handler, Barbara Cassin, Sophie Wahnich
Hosted by: Paul Holdengräber
 
America considers the pursuit of happiness an inalienable right. But where is this pursuit taking us? How valuable is positive thinking? In arts, melancholia has long been a source of inspiration. Specialist of Ancient Greece Barbara Cassin will give a philosophical point of view on the topic, and historian of the French Revolution Sophie Wahnich will bring some insight on the conditions of happiness. They will be discussing with co-authors of 13 Words Lemony Snicket (Daniel Handler) and Maira Kalman, also New Yorker cover artist and author of the acclaimed And the Pursuit of Happiness.
 
PHILIP GOUREVITCH PHILIP GOUREVITCH
SCOTT ATRAN SCOTT ATRAN
GREGOIRE CHAMAYOU GREGOIRE CHAMAYOU
ARIEL COLONOMOS ARIEL COLONOMOS

W & B FESTIVAL: THE NEW FACES OF THE ENEMY

Saturday, January 29, 2011, 5 - 5:30 p.m.
Scott Atran, Grégoire Chamayou, Ariel Colonomos, Philip Gourevitch
Hosted by: Ann Stoler
 
There is always an other, but must there always be an enemy? Is there a need for an enemy in the solidifying of social groups? Thinkers and writers from very different backgrounds will share their analyses: Philip Gourevitch has written extensively on Abu Ghraib and Rwanda, Scott Atran has studied the making of suicide bombers, Grégoire Chamayou has just published a philosophical work on the peculiarity of man hunting, and Ariel Colonomos is investigating the idea of preventive war.
JEFFREY ROSEN JEFFREY ROSEN
DIDIER BIGO DIDIER BIGO
MIREILLE DELMAS-MARTY MIREILLE DELMAS-MARTY

W & B FESTIVAL: THE END OF PRIVACY: The State and Surveillance

Saturday, January 29, 2011, 2:30 - 4 p.m.
Didier Bigo, Mireille Delmas-Marty & Jeffrey Rosen
Hosted by: John Schwartz
 
The degree of Western states’ surveillance on their citizens has dramatically increased in the past few years—whether in public spaces or online. The threat of terrorism has generated innumerable precautions, but what is the price for freedom in a post-9/11 world? French experts on international law Mireille Delmas-Marty and Didier Bigo will discuss these issues with prominent commentator on legal affairs Jeffrey Rosen.
REZA ASLAN REZA ASLAN
SALMAN AHMAD SALMAN AHMAD
FABRICE HADJADJ FABRICE HADJADJ
ALICIA JO RABINS ALICIA JO RABINS
DAMIEN POISBLUAD DAMIEN POISBLUAD

W & B FESTIVAL: THREE FAITHS IN THE FORM OF A FUGUE

Friday, January 28, 2011, 8 - 9:30 p.m.
Salman Ahmad, Reza Aslan, Fabrice Hadjadj, Alicia Jo Rabins, Shirin Neshat, Damien Poisblaud
Hosted by: Reza Aslan
 
Performing artists and writers will come together on stage: a testament to a hoped-for future of peaceful collaboration between the three great faiths of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. The evening will gather Shirin Neshat on the written word in Islam, Alicia Jo Rabins who will perform poems set to music about women in the Torah, Salman Ahmad who will play traditional ghazals mixed with rock and roll, and Fabrice Hadjadj who will read on the book of Job, in a duet with Gregorian chant singer Damien Poisblaud.
 
 

This event is sponsored by the Carnegie Corporation of New York.

CECILE GUILBERT CECILE GUILBERT
LAURA KIPNIS LAURA KIPNIS
WAYNE KOESTENBAUM WAYNE KOESTENBAUM
PAUL HOLDENGRABER PAUL HOLDENGRABER

W & B FESTIVAL: THE MAGICAL SIDE OF CELEBRITY

Friday, January 28, 2011, 6 - 7:30 p.m.

Cécile Guilbert, Laura Kipnis, Wayne Koestenbaum

Hosted by: Paul Holdengräber

Who has never dreamed of becoming famous? What is in a famous name? Why do we love stars and icons so much and why are we fascinated by them? Aren’t fame and celebrity all relative? In the era of the Internet, do we finally have a good chance to get our 15 minutes of fame, or are we just a few clicks away from suddenly becoming ephemeral stars against our will? Essayist and literary critic Cécile Guilbert has written outstanding essays on icons like Andy Warhol, Guy Debord and Lawrence Sterne, poet and critic Wayne Koestenbaum is the author of Andy Warhol and Jackie Under My Skin: Interpreting An Icon, and cultural theorist Laura Kipnis has recently published How to Become a Scandal: Adventures in Bad Behavior.

Glenn D. Lowry Glenn D. Lowry
Pierre Cassou-Noguès Pierre Cassou-Noguès
Jean-Pierre Dupuy Jean-Pierre Dupuy
Carrie Lambert-Beatty Carrie Lambert-Beatty
D. Graham Burnett D. Graham Burnett

RESCHEDULED for 1/28 at 1:00PM W & B FESTIVAL: ART / TRUTH / LIES: The Perils and Pleasures of Deception

Friday, January 28, 2011, 1 - 2:30 p.m.
This program has been rescheduled for January 28th at 1:00pm. 
 
Glenn D. Lowry, Pierre Cassou-Noguès, Jean-Pierre Dupuy, Carrie Lambert-Beatty
Hosted by: D. Graham Burnett
 
We are witnessing a remarkable irruption of interventions and confections in contemporary art that can be loosely called "parafictional"—work that wields falsehood in powerful, ludic, and/or disturbing ways. What happens when the tricksterfakery of these artistic cons unsettles the archive itself? Should we be concerned? What are the implications for this convergence of the artist and the forger? French philosophers Pierre Cassou-Noguès and Jean-Pierre Dupuy, author of article Make-Believe: Parafiction and Plausibility Carrie Lambert-Beatty, and director of the MoMA Glenn D. Lowry will tackle issues such as art and politics, virtuality and expertise, and the values of play and seriousness.
Karen Armstrong Karen Armstrong

KAREN ARMSTRONG: Twelve Steps to a Compassionate Life

Tuesday, January 11, 2011, 7 p.m.

Karen Armstrong, one of the most original thinkers on the role of religion in modern life, joins LIVE for a talk about making the world a more compassionate place. Armstrong believes that while all human beings are intrisically compassionate, we each need to work to cultivate and expand our capacity for this important instinct. She demonstrates that a compassionate life is not a matter of only heart or mind but a deliberate and often life-altering commingling of the two.

This program is part of series of events related to NYPL’s exhibition Three Faiths: Judaism, Christianity, Islam on view in the Gottesman Exhibition Hall, Stephen A. Schwarzman Building through February 27, 2011.

GYPSY ROSE LEE GYPSY ROSE LEE

GYPSY ROSE LEE: AN AMERICAN ICON LAID BARE

Saturday, January 8, 2011, 7 p.m.

On January 8, 2011, the world's most famous burlesque performer turns 100 years old. Join LIVE from the NYPL for a centennial celebration of the birth of Gypsy Rose Lee: novelist, playwright, New Yorker essayist, fashion icon, actress, activist, member of New York’s literati, world-famous “ecdysiast" and subject of one of the best-loved musicals in American history. Be amused and appalled by dramatic readings from never-before-published letters in Gypsy’s archives, housed in the New York Public Library.

AN EVENING WITH THE NATIONAL LAMPOON TO MAKE THE LIONS ROAR WITH LAUGHTER

Saturday, December 4, 2010, 7 p.m.

RICK MEYEROWITZ, HILTON ALS, JOHN WEIDMAN, SEAN KELLY, BRIAN MCCONNACHIE, CHRISTOPHER CERF, FRED GRAVER, TONY HENDRA, MICHEL CHOQUETTE, LARRY "RATSO" SLOMAN, JOE RANDAZZO,PETER REIGERT and others!

Featuring music by ALICE PLAYTEN, PAUL JACOBS, SARAH DURKEE and CHRISTOPHER CERF.

Read these reviews of Drunk Stoned Brilliant Dead: The Writers and Artists Who Made the National Lampoon Insanely Great : The Wall Street Journal , The New Yorker

DEREK WALCOTT DEREK WALCOTT

DEREK WALCOTT: "Hemingway and the Caribbean"

Friday, December 3, 2010, 7 p.m.

The Nobel Prize winning poet Derek Walcott gives a new appreciation of Hemingway as a great and influential Caribbean writer, acknowledging Hemingway's influence on his writing and paying tribute to him with readings of his own poems.

Zadie Smith Zadie Smith

ZADIE SMITH

Monday, November 22, 2010, 7 - 9 p.m.

Divided into four sections—“Reading,” “Being,” “Seeing,” and “Feeling”— Zadie Smith’s CHANGING MY MIND depicts a range of experiences, from daily activities to a trip to Liberia, Smith incorporates an assortment of themes including literature, movies, going to the Oscars, British comedy, family, feminism, Obama, Katharine Hepburn, and Anna Magnani.  

With CHANGING MY MIND, Zadie Smith reveals much of herself.  She delivers a moving appreciation of the work and thought of David Foster Wallace, and her literary criticism explores the tremendous influence that diverse writers—E. M. Forster, Zora Neale Hurston, George Eliot, and others—have had on her writing. 

SIDDHARTHA MUKHERJEE SIDDHARTHA MUKHERJEE

SIDDHARTHA MUKHERJEE

Thursday, November 18, 2010, 7 p.m.

From the origins of cancer on the scrolls of ancient Egyptian medical records to the epic modern battles to conquer it, Siddhartha Mukherjee, a leading cancer physician and researcher, brings the history of cancer to wild and terrifying life.

Mukherjee provides a window in to key figures such as Sidney Farber, the father of modern chemotherapy, holed up in the cellar of a Boston hospital and characterized by a colleague as a "cancer maniac," and William Halsted, bewhiskered, obsessive, and addicted to cocaine, who created and perfected the radical and super-radical surgeries that would become the norm in cases of breast cancer.

JAY-Z JAY-Z

JAY-Z in conversation with Cornel West and Paul Holdengräber

Monday, November 15, 2010, 7 - 9 p.m.

Fiercely candid, uncompromising, provocative, inspiring—DECODED is the long awaited first book by the multi-platinum, 10 time Grammy Award winning artist, entrepreneur, and icon JAY-Z.

ANTONIO DAMASIO ANTONIO DAMASIO

ANTONIO DAMASIO & MARINA ABRAMOVIC

Friday, November 12, 2010, 7 p.m.

In his new book, Self Comes To Mind, Antonio Damasio, who directs the USC Brain and Creativity Institute and is the 2010 winner of the prestigious Honda Prize for scientific excellence, discusses how the brain uses emotion and feeling to create a sense of self in animals in humans, and how the elaborate version of the human self opened the way for creating the tools of culture. The admired neuroscientist, provocative lecturer and best-selling author will be in conversation with Marina Abramovic, the celebrated, spirited and controversial artist who, since the beginning of her career, has pioneered performance as a visual art form in a quest for emotional and spiritual transformation.

EDWIDGE DANTICAT EDWIDGE DANTICAT

EDWIDGE DANTICAT

Wednesday, November 10, 2010, 7 p.m.

In CREATE DANGEROUSLY: The Immigrant Artist at Work, Edwidge Danticat draws on her Haitian background, experiences as an author and comments from colleagues in art, literature, photography, and journalism, to address these and other important questions:

• What is it to be an artist?
• What is it to be an immigrant?
• What is it to be both—working outside of your homeland and creating art, literature, film, photography that strives to bring specific truths to the world?
• What is it to be simultaneously celebrated for drawing attention to human rights issues and vilified for revealing the worst about your homeland?

Edwidge will be joined in conversation by Paul Holdengräber, Director of LIVE from the NYPL.

SLAVOJ ZIZEK SLAVOJ ZIZEK

SLAVOJ ZIZEK,God Without the Sacred: The Book of Job, The First Critique of Ideology

Tuesday, November 9, 2010, 7 p.m.

The three religions of the Book each help us to differentiate the divine from the sacred. This liberating concept culminates in Paul's claim, from Ephesians, that "our struggle is not against flesh and blood, but against leaders, against authorities, against the world rulers of this darkness, against the spiritual wickedness in the heavens."  Can religious fundamentalism be overcome only with the help of an emancipatory political theology? Philosopher Slavoj Zizek debates this and other incendiary questions on the LIVE stage.

This event is sponsored by the Carnegie Corporation of New York.

Antonia Fraser Antonia Fraser

ANTONIA FRASER in conversation with Oskar Eustis

Thursday, November 4, 2010, 7 p.m.

In MUST YOU GO?, Lady Antonia Fraser recounts the life she shared with the internationally renowned dramatist and Nobel Prize winner, Harold Pinter. The book is based on diaries she has kept since October 1968.  Fraser's diaries, written by a biographer living with a creative artist and observing the process firsthand, also provide a unique insight into Harold Pinters writing and portray a literary marriage unfolding in real time. Fraser shares Harold Pinter's own revelations about his past, as well as observations by his friends.

MUST YOU GO? is a testament to one of modern literature’s most celebrated marriages.

Keith Richards Keith Richards

KEITH RICHARDS

Friday, October 29, 2010, 7 - 8:30 p.m.

Tickets for Keith Richards are sold-out! Thanks, all, for your interest. To the lucky ones, see you Friday, October 29, 2010.

  • Each ticket purchased through Showclix for this program includes a copy of Life by Keith Richards that will be provided to the patron upon admission to the program the evening of the event.
  • Print outs of tickets will not be accepted. All patrons are to check in at will-call for tickets.
  • Ticketholders must provide ID that matches the name on the ticket at will-call to be admitted the  evening of the event to be admitted.
  • There will be no standby line for this event.
  • There will be no live streaming during the event.

"When you are growing up there are two institutional places that affect you most powerfully: the church which belongs to God, and the public Library, which belongs to you. The public library is the great equalizer."
--Keith Richards

Outlaw, hellraiser, and one of rock music's most gifted and influential guitarists, Keith Richards has forged a life that most of us can only imagine--and often envy. Amazingly he's lived to tell about it, and now this rock Icon has given us the definitive rock autobiography.

In Life, the man himself tells about life lived fast and hard in the creative hurricane--from his days as a young boy growing up in a council estate, listening obsessively to Chuck Berry and Muddy Waters records, to joining forces with Mick Jagger and Brian Jones to form The Rolling Stones.
 

Angela Davis Angela Davis
Toni Morrison Toni Morrison

ANGELA DAVIS & TONI MORRISON

Wednesday, October 27, 2010, 7 p.m.
W.S. Merwin W.S. Merwin

W.S. MERWIN in conversation with Paul Holdengräber

Friday, October 22, 2010, 7 p.m.

In July of 2010, the Library of Congress named W.S. Merwin to serve at the 17th Poet Laureate of the United States. LIVE from the NYPL is honored to welcome W.S. Merwin for a far-ranging conversation with Paul Holdengräber on his extraordinary career as a poet and translator and to read some of his earliest and some of his most recent work. Please join us in celebrating W.S. Merwin before his upcoming reading at the Library of Congress as Poet Laureate.

Mike Daisey Mike Daisey

THE MOTH. OMG: Stories of the Sacred

Thursday, October 21, 2010, 8 p.m.

“Gotta have faith.” - George Michael

Moshe, Musa or Moses. Join The Moth as we explore the common and uncommon threads through three different religions, all of which extol the virtues of humility, service, compassion, forgiveness and most of all, love. Hear tales of hallowed spaces and blessed events. Soul searchers, devotees and agnostics tell stories of faith, doubt and the places in between. Can we get a witness?

Hosted by:
Mike Daisey

Stories by:

Kevin Kelly Kevin Kelly
Steven Johnson Steven Johnson
Robert Krulwich Robert Krulwich

STEVEN JOHNSON & KEVIN KELLY in conversation with Robert Krulwich

Monday, October 18, 2010, 8 p.m.

In a world of rapidly accelerating change, from iPads to eBooks to genetic mapping to MagLev trains, we can't help but wonder if technology is our servant or our master, and whether it is taking us in a healthy direction as a society.

David Grossman David Grossman
Nicole Krauss Nicole Krauss

DAVID GROSSMAN & NICOLE KRAUSS

Wednesday, October 13, 2010, 7 p.m.

In his powerful new novel, To the End of the Land, David Grossman tells the story of today’s Israel through the eyes of a mother whose son has volunteered for a second tour of duty in the army. Through her fears and her love, the deep stories of her son, her lovers, and all of their lives, Grossman portrays a country tormented by war, and casts light on the internal and external conflicts that have shaped many Israeli generations.

David Chang David Chang
René Redzepi René Redzepi
Ruth Reichl Ruth Reichl

Tasting Culture with Rene Redzepi, Ruth Reichl & David Chang

Wednesday, October 6, 2010, 7 p.m.

What makes a cuisine? What does it mean to taste a culture's culinary environment? As the head Chef of NOMA in Copenhagen, Rene Redzepi has been credited with reinventing Nordic food with his passion, philosophy, sourcing of ingredients, and experimentation. His fascination with serving a real taste of the region extends to presenting dishes on pebbles found in the same fields as his produce. 

David Chang, executive chef and owner of Momofuku Noodle Bar in New York and Ruth Reichl, writer and editor, will discuss with Redzepi about the identity of place. Reichl will moderate a discussion with these two about what cultural identity means for chefs, their menus and the experiences of diners who sit down at their table.

Stephen Breyer Stephen Breyer
Jeffrey Rosen Jeffrey Rosen
Paul Holdengräber Paul Holdengräber

JUSTICE STEPHEN BREYER in conversation with Jeffrey Rosen & Paul Holdengräber

Monday, September 20, 2010, 7 - 8:30 p.m.

Justice Breyer will be joined by author Jeffrey Rosen and Paul Holdengräber for a conversation about his book Making Our Democracy Work: A Judge's View. Together, they will examine what the Court must do to maintain public confidence and discuss the ten books that shaped Justice Breyer’s intellectual persona.

An Evening on the World Cup

Tuesday, June 15, 2010, 7 - 8:30 p.m.

Please Stay Tuned for more information.

LENA HERZOG in conversation with LAWRENCE WESCHLER

Tuesday, June 8, 2010, 7 - 8:30 p.m.

Established in the early 18th century, Russia’s first Kunstkammer triggered a profound debate over religious and existential questions. The Orthodox Church, faced with a collection of Cyclopes, Siamese twins, and creatures that looked like lions or leprechauns, could not justify nature’s unsuccessful attempts at human life and deemed their souls lost: they could not go to heaven, hell or limbo–they were dead on arrival and had nowhere to go.

JOHN WATERS in conversation with Paul Holdengraber in BRYANT PARK

Monday, June 7, 2010, 8 - 9:30 p.m.
The UPPER TERRACE is located in Bryant Park directly behind the NYPL, between 40th and 42nd Streets & 5th and 6th Avenues. Take the F, V, B, or D to 42nd St. / Bryant Park. Or, take the 7 to 5th Avenue.
Enter Bryant Park on 40th Street between 5th and 6th Avenue.

LIVE from the NYPL INFO TABLE, BOOKSELLING & BOX OFFICE

OPEN AT 6:00PM Located near the Gertrude Stein statue on the Upper Terrace (Enter the park from 40th Street). Only LIVE from the NYPL ticket holders who have already purchased tickets for the South Court program through Showclix, VIP guests and Press are to check in at the Box Office.

CHRISTOPHER HITCHENS in conversation with Paul Holdengraber

Friday, June 4, 2010, 7 - 8:30 p.m.
Christopher Hitchens, tackling nearly everything with unmatched enthusiasm, erudition and, at times venom, has up to now barely touched upon one subject: his own life.

After many years writing about world issues and traveling to some of the most dangerous places on the planet, comes his memoir Hitch-22.  Though Hitchens can navigate any argument  with great dexterity, his memoir focuses on those whom he has loved, those he has abhorred, and those who have helped shape him throughout his life. The memoir answers this question: How the hell did Christopher Hitchens become Christopher Hitchens?

PHILIP PULLMAN in conversation with Paul Holdengraber

Tuesday, May 11, 2010, 7 - 8:30 p.m.

This program has been canceled. All tickets will be refunded. Please contact live@nypl.org or 212 930 0855 with questions.

Challenging the events of the gospels in his latest book, The Good Man Jesus and the Scoundrel Christ, Philip Pullman puts forward a compelling and plausible version of the life of Jesus. The story Pullman tells comes out of the tension within the dual nature of Jesus Christ. Parts of it read like a novel, parts like history, and parts like a fairy tale; it is a story about how stories become stories.

 
Philip Pullman was born in Norwich, England, in 1946. His awards include the Carnegie Medal and the Whitbread Book of the Year Award. Pullman's acclaimed trilogy, His Dark Materials has been published in thirty-nine languages.

PATTI SMITH in conversation with Paul Holdengraber

Thursday, April 29, 2010, 7 - 8:30 p.m.

In Just Kids, Patti Smith’s first book of prose, the legendary American artist offers a never-before-seen glimpse of her remarkable relationship with photographer Robert Mapplethorpe in the epochal days of New York City and the Chelsea Hotel in the late sixties and seventies.  An honest story of youth and friendship, Smith brings the same unique, lyrical quality to Just Kids as she has to the rest of her formidable body of work—from her influential 1975 album Horses to her visual art and poetry.

Tickets go on sale April 9th at 11am.

PETER CAREY in conversation with Edmund White and Claire Messud

Tuesday, April 20, 2010, 7 - 8:30 p.m.

Parrot and Olivier is Peter Carey’s most recent novel, set in early 19th century America. Olivier— an improvisation on the life of Alexis de Tocqueville—is the traumatized child of aristocratic survivors of the French Revolution. Parrot is the motherless son of an itinerant English engraver.

They are born on different sides of history, but their lives are joined by an enigmatic one-armed marquis...

Through Parrot and Olivier, Peter Carey explores the adventure of American democracy in conversation with Claire Messud and Edmund White.

Voltaire's CANDIDE: A Bibliographic Laboratory

Thursday, April 15, 2010, 7 - 8:30 p.m.

Candide laboratoryAlmost immediately upon its publication in 1759, Voltaire's Candide was translated, pirated, and responded to in pamphlets, unauthorized sequels, and adaptations for stage. Since its first explosive appearance, Candide has traveled widely: to 1960s counterculture, to Broadway, to a science fiction future, and most recently, to The New York Public Library’s landmark exhibition, Candide at 250: Scandal and Success (closing April 25, 2010).

TACTILE SOUND & THE PURSUIT OF SILENCE IN A NOISY WORLD

Friday, April 9, 2010, 7 - 8:30 p.m.

ASL interpretation,  Realtime (CART) captioning, and assistive listening devices will be provided. 

 

 

 

 

PART I. ON THE PURSUIT OF SILENCE IN A NOISY WORLD

GEORGE PROCHNIK in conversation with Paul Holdengräber

DAVID REMNICK & Ta-Nehisi Coates in conversation

Tuesday, April 6, 2010, 7 - 8:30 p.m.

“Barack Obama is what comes at the end of that bridge in Selma.”
             -Veteran congressman and civil-rights leader John Lewis

Obama’s election as the first African-American President came at the end of a personal journey that intersected with the history of race in American politics.

A Tribute to George Carlin hosted by Whoopi Goldberg

Wednesday, March 24, 2010, 7 - 8:30 p.m.

George Carlin is remembered for his unique and quintessentially New York voice, his coruscating mastery of the English language and his devastatingly funny insights into such timeless human follies as war, class, moral hypocrisy, God and golf.

       
Live from the NYPL presents an evening to honor the publication of George Carlin's posthumous “sortabiography” Last Words (written with Tony Hendra).

Whoopi Goldberg will host an eclectic gathering of comedic and cultural icons and friends who come together to celebrate George Carlin’s life, art, extraordinary half-century in comedy and broad cultural influence with readings, anecdotes, memories, personal tributes as well nostalgic selections from some of the greatest performance art of the 20th century - by the guest of honor himself.

LEARNING FROM THE ABSURD: A Conversation with William Kentridge

Friday, March 12, 2010, 2 - 3:30 p.m.

In Collaboration with The Metropolitan Opera

Paul Holdengräber hosts William Kentridge, in a conversation about Gogol, Shostakovich, and Kentridge’s creative process.

RICHARD HOLMES in conversation with Paul Holdengraber

Wednesday, March 10, 2010, 7 - 8:30 p.m.

In The Age of Wonder, Richard Holmes investigates the earliest ideas of deep time and space, and the explorers of “dynamic science,” of an infinite, mysterious Nature waiting to be discovered. This age of exploration extended to great writers and poets as well as scientists, all creators relishing in moments of high exhilaration, boundary-pushing, and discovery. Holmes shows how great ideas and experiments—both successes and failures—were born of singular and often lonely dedication, and how religious faith and scientific truth collide.

Richard Holmes is the author of Footsteps: Adventures of a Romantic Biographer, Sidetracks: Explorations of a Romantic Biographer; Dr. Johnson & Mr. Savage, Shelley: The Pursuit, Coleridge: Early Visions and Coleridge: Darker Reflections. He lives in England.

Krista TIPPETT & Andrew SOLOMON: Einstein's God: Conversations about Science

Wednesday, March 3, 2010, 7 - 8:30 p.m.

KRISTA TIPPETT & ANDREW SOLOMON
Einstein's God: Conversations about Science
Instigated by Paul Holdengräber

ANDRÉ ACIMAN in conversation with PAUL LECLERC

Tuesday, February 23, 2010, 7 - 8:30 p.m.

At the opening of André Aciman's new novel, Eight White Nights, a young woman introduces herself to the unnamed narrator by saying, “I am Clara” setting in motion an obsession with this fascinating and unreachable woman. Meeting every evening over the following seven days at the same cinema in Manhattan’s Upper West Side, they both navigate the desire to ask for and to express love as their relationship becomes all the more intense and enigmatic.

André Aciman is the author of Call Me by Your Name, Out of Egypt, and False Papers, and is the editor of The Proust Project. He teaches comparative literature at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York.

 

 

 

 

 

GARRY WILLS in conversation with Paul Holdengraber

Monday, February 1, 2010, 7 - 8:30 p.m.

In BOMB POWER: The Modern Presidency and the National Security State, Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Garry Wills reveals how the atomic bomb transformed our nation down to its deepest constitutional roots—by dramatically increasing the power of the modern presidency and redefining the government as a national security state. The bomb forever changed the institution of the presidency since only the president controls “the button” and, by extension, the fate of the world. Garry Wills casts the history of the postwar period in a new light and sounds an alarm about the continued threat to our Constitution.

The Velvet Underground with Lou Reed, Maureen Moe Tucker, Doug Yule & David Fricke

Tuesday, December 8, 2009, 7 - 8 p.m.

The Art and Soul of The Velvet Underground

In the historic ferment of Sixties rock, the Velvet Underground were the perfect band in the right city, New York, at a crucial time.

For five years 1965 to 1970 singer-songwriter and guitarist Lou Reed, bassist and viola player John Cale, guitarist Sterling Morrison and drummer Maureen Tucker, with the German vocalist Nico and bassist Doug Yule (who replaced Cale in 1968), broadcast the real life of their home town the sex, drugs and art; the furious street energies, hidden pleasures and desperate romance in an unprecedented pop music of vivid storytelling and transgressive excitement.

Javier Marías & Paul Holdengräber

Thursday, December 3, 2009, 2 - 3 p.m.

Admired by Bolaño, Ashbery, Sebald, and Coetzee, Javier Marías is widely considered one of Spain's greatest living writers. Poison, Shadow, and Farewell brings to a close Marías's three-part novel Your Face Tomorrow.

With its heightened tensions between meditations and noir narrative, Poison, Shadow, and Farewell takes Jacques Deza back to Madrid to both spy on and try to protect his own family, and into new depths of love and loss.

Kati Marton & Volker Schlondörff

Thursday, November 12, 2009, 7 - 8 p.m.

Chronicling her journey from Cold War Budapest where her family was deemed "Enemies of the People," accomplished journalist Kati Marton speaks with renowned filmmaker, Volker Schlondörff (The Tin Drum and The Lost Honor of Katharina Blum)about opening Pandora's box when requesting her family's secret police files in Budapest.

Against the background of one of the Soviet occupations of Eastern Europe, Enemies of the People: My Family’s Journey to America is a story of love and survival.

Wes Anderson & Noah BaumbachThe Fantastic Mr. Fox

Monday, November 9, 2009, 7 - 8 p.m.

LIVE from the NYPL presents an evening with director WES ANDERSON (Rushmore, The Royal Tenenbaums) in conversation with screenplay co-writer NOAH BAUMBACH (The Squid and the Whale) about Fantastic Mr. Fox, Wes Anderson's first animated film. In Fantastic Mr. Fox, Wes Anderson utilizes classic handmade stop-motion techniques to tell the story of the classic children's book by ROALD DAHL.

Mr. and Mrs. Fox (George Clooney and Meryl Streep) live an idyllic home life with their son Ash (Jason Schwartzman) and visiting young nephew Kristofferson (Eric Anderson). But after twelve years of quiet domesticity, the bucolic existence proves too much for Mr. Fox’s wild animal instincts. Soon he slips back into his old ways as a sneaky chicken thief and in doing so, endangers not only his beloved family, but the whole animal community...

William Grimes, Ruth Reichl & Others: Appetite City: A Culinary History of New York

Thursday, November 5, 2009, 7 - 8 p.m.

Restaurant critic and author William Grimes, joined by Editor in Chief of Gourmet Magazine Ruth Reichl and others, illuminates the fascinating culinary history of New York by describing how restaurant life has changed over the years.

Barbara Kingsolver & Ilan Stavans in Conversation

Wednesday, November 4, 2009, 7 - 8 p.m.

Ilan Stavans, A native from Mexico and author of The Hispanic Condition, On Borrowed Words, Love and Language, and other books will be in conversation with Barbara Kingsolver about her most recent book, The Lacuna, a gripping story of identity, connection with our past, and the power of words to create or devastate. Barbara Kingsolver illuminates an era when bold internationalism gave way to a postwar landscape narrowly defined as Americanism. The Lacuna crosses two decades, from the vibrant revolutionary murals of Mexico City to the halls of a Congress bent on eradicating the color Red.

About Barbara Kingsolver

LIVE from the NYPL & The Aspen Institute Present: Capitalism and the Future

Tuesday, November 3, 2009, 7 - 8 p.m.

What will the American economic system look like in the months and years ahead? Who are the innovators currently shaping the future? And what will be the role of business in that future?

President of the Aspen Institute, Walter Isaacson invites Niall Ferguson, MA, D.Phil., Laurence A. Tisch Professor of History at Harvard University and William Ziegler Professor at Harvard Business School, Indra Nooyi, Chair and CEO of Pepsico, Eric Schmidt, Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer, Google, and Nassim Taleb, scholar of randomness and risk, literary essayist, and derivatives trader, to consider the issues in the media and on the public mind.

About Niall Ferguson

Ira Glass and Etgar Keret: Is Reality Overrated?

Wednesday, October 28, 2009, 8 - 9 p.m.

This American Life host Ira Glass talks with writer Etgar Keret about his short fiction and films, runaway piggy banks, bus drivers and other, lesser gods.

This event is co-sponsored by Office of Cultural Affairs, Consulate General of Israel in New York.

About Ira Glass

The Creative Time Summit: Revolutions in Public Practice

Saturday, October 24, 2009, 11 a.m. - 12 p.m.

For 35 years, Creative Time has been committed to groundbreaking new models in art-making that actively engages with and transforms the world around us. Over 40 international artists and critics whose work continues to have an impact on the world, including Thomas Hirschorn, The Yes Men, Suzanne Lacy, and Alfredo Jaar will make short, pointed, and dynamic presentations on their work and art and social justice in the public sphere.

Morris Dickstein, author of Dancing in the Dark: A Cultural History of the Great Depression will offer a homily on the challenges and opportunities artists and critics faced in the Great Depression and are confronted with today.

The Creative Time Summit: Revolutions in Public Practice

Friday, October 23, 2009, 7 - 8 p.m.

For 35 years, Creative Time has been committed to groundbreaking new models in art-making that actively engages with and transforms the world around us. Over 40 international artists and critics whose work continues to have an impact on the world, including Thomas Hirschorn, The Yes Men, Suzanne Lacy, and Alfredo Jaar will make short, pointed, and dynamic presentations on their work and art and social justice in the public sphere.

Morris Dickstein, author of Dancing in the Dark: A Cultural History of the Great Depression will offer a homily on the challenges and opportunities artists and critics faced in the Great Depression and are confronted with today.

William Forsythe & Alva Noë

Friday, October 9, 2009, 2 - 3 p.m.

World-renowned choreographer William Forsythe and cognitive scientist Alva Noë, author of Out of Our Heads: Why You Are Not Your Brain, and Other Lessons from the Biology of Consciousness, examine consciousness as a kind of dance. Together they will explore Noë’s assertion that consciousness is not something that happens inside of us, in our brains, or anywhere else. It is something we do, in our active engagement with the world.

About Alva Noë
Alva Noë is a professor of philosophy at the University of California, Berkeley, where he is also a member of the Institute of Cognitive and Brain Sciences. His previous book, Action in Perception, was published in 2004.

About William Forsythe

Cognitive Theater: An Evening with Peter Gelb, Bartlett Sher & Patrice Chéreauinstigated by Paul Holdengräber

Thursday, October 8, 2009, 8 - 9 p.m.

Over the past few seasons, Met General Manager Peter Gelb has enlisted some of the world's greatest directors to heighten the theatricality of Met productions. Two of the finest, Bartlett Sher and Patrice Chéreau, will join Gelb for a conversation on opera, theater, and the art of directing. Sher, who won a Tony Award for his direction of South Pacific, made his Met debut in 2006 with an acclaimed new staging of Il Barbiere di Siviglia. He returns to the Met this season with a new production of Offenbach's Les Contes d'Hoffmann. Chéreau makes his long-awaited U.S. opera debut this season with a new production of Janácek's From the House of the Dead the staging caused a sensation when it premiered in Europe in 2007. Paul Holdengräber instigates a conversation with these two visionary directors and the man who brought them to the Met.

LIVE from the NYPL & Akashic Books Present: Ryan Adams & Mary-Louise Parker

Friday, September 25, 2009, 7 - 8 p.m.

Known for his acclaimed albums Love Is Hell, Jacksonville, City Nights, Easy Tiger, Heartbreaker, and Gold, alt-country/rock singer and songwriter Ryan Adams discusses poetry and fiction, and his most recent book HelloSunshine with Tony Award winning actress Mary-Louise Parker.
This program is co-presented by Akashic Books.Akashic Books.

Rebecca Solnit & Peter Coyote in Conversation

Thursday, September 24, 2009, 8 - 9 p.m.

Why is it that in the aftermath of a disaster whether natural or manmade so many people suddenly become altruistic, resilient, resourceful, and brave, stirred and motivated by a newfound sense of community and purpose? Rebecca Solnit shows how disaster throws people into a temporary utopia of changed states of mind, and how the social connectedness that subsequently arises can help lead us to a new vision of what society could become one that is more collaborative, cooperative, and local. Solnit's narrative travels through five major North American disasters, from the 1906 earthquake in San Francisco and the 1917 explosion that tore up Halifax,Nova Scotia, to the 1985 Mexico City earthquake, 9/11, and Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans.

OPENING NIGHT! Oliver Sacks, Hallucinations

Monday, September 21, 2009, 8 - 9 p.m.

The Robert B. Silvers Lecture.
Neurologist and author Oliver Sacks examines how the normal brain, if deprived of perceptual input, may generate illusory sensations as with the visual hallucinations of the blind, or the musical hallucinations of the deaf.

This event is also sponsored by Sutherland.

About Oliver Sacks

ISLAM IN EUROPE Insult: Fractured States? Part VConclusions: Where Do We Go From Here? Paul HOLDENGRÄBER, Benjamin BARBER, Jocelyn CESARI, Khaled Fouad ALLAM, Bas HEIJNE & Imam Abduljalil SAJID

Thursday, June 11, 2009, 7 p.m.

Muslim Voices: Arts & Ideas Festival

ISLAM IN EUROPEInsult: Fractured States? is a three-evening symposium on June 9, 10, and 11 that gathers prominent, cross-sector speakers from diverse disciplines and the Muslim diaspora to share country-specific perspectives on Muslim communities’ integration in European society.

In five events, ISLAM IN EUROPE sets the context for and explores multiple perspectives for viewing relations between European societies and their Muslim communities. Participants will examine how different European nations and the Muslim diasporas within their borders consider immediate local issues, as well as look at the development of a Europe-wide discourse. The program also offers opportunities to bring American voices into this dialogue and is aimed at identifying opportunities for cross-cultural understanding and cooperation.

ISLAM IN EUROPE Insult: Fractured States? Part IV Media: A Catalyst for ChangeShamil IDRISS, Her Majesty Queen NOOR, Emanuele CASTANO, Mohamed EL-FATATRY & Andrea ter AVEST DAHM

Thursday, June 11, 2009, 5 p.m.

Muslim Voices: Arts & Ideas Festival

ISLAM IN EUROPE Insult: Fractured States? is a three-evening symposium on June 9, 10, and 11 that gathers prominent, cross-sector speakers from diverse disciplines and the Muslim diaspora to share country-specific perspectives on Muslim communities integration in European society.

In five events, ISLAM IN EUROPE sets the context for and explores multiple perspectives for viewing relations between European societies and their Muslim communities. Participants will examine how different European nations and the Muslim diasporas within their borders consider immediate local issues, as well as look at the development of a Europe-wide discourse. The program also offers opportunities to bring American voices into this dialogue and is aimed at identifying opportunities for cross-cultural understanding and cooperation.

ISLAM IN EUROPE Insult: Fractured States? Part III Youth: The Future Moustafa BAYOUMI, Nanna WESTH, Farid HAFEZ, Ziyah GAFIC, Nebojša Šeric SHOBA & Krzysztof CZYZEWSKI

Wednesday, June 10, 2009, 7:30 p.m.

Muslim Voices: Arts & Ideas Festival

ISLAM IN EUROPE Insult: Fractured States? is a three-evening symposium on June 9, 10, and 11 that gathers prominent, cross-sector speakers from diverse disciplines and the Muslim diaspora to share country-specific perspectives on Muslim communities’ integration in European society.

In five events, ISLAM IN EUROPE sets the context for and explores multiple perspectives for viewing relations between European societies and their Muslim communities. Participants will examine how different European nations and the Muslim diasporas within their borders consider immediate local issues, as well as look at the development of a Europe-wide discourse. The program also offers opportunities to bring American voices into this dialogue and is aimed at identifying opportunities for cross-cultural understanding and cooperation.

Through scholarly debate, the related voices of participants of ISLAM IN EUROPE will articulate new perspectives offering insight into the ideas that shape policy and thought.

Part I, June 9, 7:00 pm
Opening Event: How Did We Get Here?
Part II, June 10, 6:00 pm
Migration Policy, Response and Reaction: The Status Quo
Part III, June 10, 7:30 pm
Youth: The Future
Part IV, June 11, 5:00 pm
Media: A Catalyst For Change
Part V, June 11, 7:00 pm
Conclusions: Where Do We Go From Here?

PART III YOUTH: THE FUTURE

This debate investigates how young people, as Western citizens who are fully confident in their Muslim identities, tackle thorny societal issues and challenge old paradigms, and discuss how young people can play an integral role in creating a better, socially coherent future.

Moustafa Bayoumi, City University of New York, moderator

Special guests panelists include Nanna Westh (filmmaker, Denmark), Farid Hafez (University of Vienna, Austria), Ziyah Gafic (Photographer, Bosnia-Hercegovina), and respondents, Nebojša Šeric Shoba (visual artist, Bosnia-Hercegovina) and Krzysztof Czyzewski (Borderland Foundation, Poland).

About Moustafa Bayoumi

Moustafa Bayoumi is an associate professor of English at Brooklyn College, the City University of New York. Born in Switzerland and raised in Canada, he is co-editor of The Edward Said Reader and has published academic essays in The Yale Journal of Criticism, Amerasia, Arab Studies Quarterly, The Journal of Asian American Studies, and other places. His writings have also appeared in The Nation and The London Review of Books. He is currently an editor for Middle East Report.

About Krzysztof Czyzewski

Krzysztof Czyzewski is a social activist, theater producer, essayist, and publisher, and the founder and president of the Borderlands Foundation (Fundacja Pogranicze) in Sejny, Poland. In 1990, the Borderlands Foundation was founded to memorialize, rebuild, and sustain the rich cultural diversity in Central and Eastern Europe. Czyzewski has brought the Foundation's model to regions of ethnic tension around the world. Since 2003 he has been an active member of the European Culture Parliament and in 2008 he served as Polish Ambassador to the European Commission's European Year of Intercultural Dialogue.

About Farid Hafez

Farid Hafez works at the Institute of Philosophy of Law, Law of Religion, and Culture in Austria and studies at the Institute of Political Science at the University of Vienna. Hafez is also the co-editor of the first volume of Islamophobia in Austria. Hafez teaches at the Institute of Oriental Studies in Vienna on "Islam in Austria". In 1996, Hafez co-founded the Muslim Youth Organization and is frequently interviewed by the Austrian media on issues related to the life of Muslims in Austria.

About Ziyah Gafic

Ziyah Gafic is a photographer based in Sarajevo. His most recent exhibition, “Troubled Islam: Short stories from Troubled Societie,” presented in Beacon, NY, is a series of photo essays on the aftermath of war and violence in the daily lives of people living from Bosnia to Kosovo, Chechnya, Afghanistan, Lebanon, Palestine, Iran and Iraq. He is the author of the book Muslims of New York. He regularly contributes to The New York Times Magazine, TIME, Liberation, and Le Monde, among others. His work has also been exhibited worldwide at such places as London Tom Blau Gallery and New York "Fovea editions" gallery.

About Nebojša Šeric Shoba

Nebojša Šeric Shoba is a visual artist who has shown work most recently at Warlord, Smith Stewart Gallery, New York; “Neo Constructivism: Art, Architecture & Activism,” Rutger’s Paul Robeson Gallery and NJ School of Architecture Gallery, Newark; “Now is the winter,” Proekt_Fabrika, Moscow, Russia; and “Greater New York,” P.S 1/MoMA, New York. His work has also been exhibited in the Venice Bienalle, Italy. His work has appeared in “Political Minimalism” by Claus Biesenbach, in Flash Art Magazine.

About Nanna Westh

Nanna Westh is a screenwriter and documentarist for television. She wrote the script for the Danish TV-series Yallahrup Færgeby about two preteens, Ali and Hassan, and their endeavours to succeed in the suburban ghetto and become “real gangstas.” Westh has previously worked for the Danish Public Broadcaster DR for seven years, making documentaries for television and radio.

Muslim Voices: Arts & Ideas is a celebration of the extraordinary range of artistic expression in the Muslim world, co-presented by Asia Society, the Brooklyn Academy of Music (BAM), and New York University Center for Dialogues during June 5 - 14.

This event is sponsored by European Union National Institutes for Culture (EUNIC).

This event is in partnership with Muslim Voices: Arts & Ideas.

ISLAM IN EUROPE Insult: Fractured States? Part IIMigration Policy, Response and Reaction: The Status QuoPaul BERMAN, Ingmar KARLSSON, Anne GRUNG, Ahmet KURU, Hasni ABIDI & Luz GÓMEZ-GARCÍA

Wednesday, June 10, 2009, 6 p.m.

Muslim Voices: Arts & Ideas Festival

ISLAM IN EUROPE Insult: Fractured States? is a three-evening symposium on June 9, 10, and 11 that gathers prominent, cross-sector speakers from diverse disciplines and the Muslim diaspora to share country-specific perspectives on Muslim communities’ integration in European society.

In five events, ISLAM IN EUROPE sets the context for and explores multiple perspectives for viewing relations between European societies and their Muslim communities. Participants will examine how different European nations and the Muslim diasporas within their borders consider immediate local issues, as well as look at the development of a Europe-wide discourse. The program also offers opportunities to bring American voices into this dialogue and is aimed at identifying opportunities for cross-cultural understanding and cooperation.

ISLAM IN EUROPE Insult: Fractured States? Part IOpening Event: How Did We Get Here? David BRANCACCIO, Benjamin BARBER, Tahar BEN JELLOUN & Imam Abduljalil SAJID

Tuesday, June 9, 2009, 7 p.m.

Muslim Voices: Arts & Ideas Festival

ISLAM IN EUROPE Insult: Fractured States? is a three-evening symposium on June 9, 10, and 11 that gathers prominent, cross-sector speakers from diverse disciplines and the Muslim diaspora to share country-specific perspectives on Muslim communities integration in European society.

In five events, ISLAM IN EUROPE sets the context for and explores multiple perspectives for viewing relations between European societies and their Muslim communities. Participants will examine how different European nations and the Muslim diasporas within their borders consider immediate local issues, as well as look at the development of a Europe-wide discourse. The program also offers opportunities to bring American voices into this dialogue and is aimed at identifying opportunities for cross-cultural understanding and cooperation.

ALAIN DE BOTTON in conversation with Paul Holdengräber: The Pleasures and Sorrows of Work

Monday, June 8, 2009, 7 p.m.

We spend much of our lives at work but surprisingly little is written about what makes work both one of the most exciting and most painful of all our activities.

London-based author Alain de Botton explores the joys and perils of the modern workplace. In The Pleasures and Sorrows of Work, he wonders about what other people get up to all day and night to make the frenzied contemporary world function. He looks at an eclectic range of occupations, from rocket science to biscuit manufacture, accountancy to art, in search of what make jobs either fulfilling or soul-destroying.

In discussion with Paul Holdengräber, de Botton will address the questions we all ask of our work:

NEW EYES ON THE ARAB WORLD: Breaking Down Barriers of Fear and PrejudicePeter THEROUX, Raja ALEM, Tom McDONOUGH, Muhammed AL MUR, Joe SACCO & Sulaiman AL HATTLAN, moderator

Saturday, May 30, 2009, 7 p.m.

Five writers, Peter Theroux, Raja Alem, Tom McDonough, Muhammed Al Mur, and Joe Sacco, Arab and American, who have taken innovative approaches to portraying the Arab World to an American audience discuss the challenges they have faced and the successes they have achieved in breaking down the barriers of fear and prejudice through their work. Journalist and writer Sulaiman Al Hattlan will moderate.

Whether through travelogue, memoir, graphic novel, children's literature or translation, these writers have widened the lens and sharpened the focus of American readers' view, setting a new precedent for sensitivity, creativity and insight in literature about the Arab World.

ADAM GOPNIK with STEVEN PINKER How Far Can Darwin Take Us?

Wednesday, May 20, 2009, 7 p.m.

Adam Gopnik, author of Angels & Ages, A Short Book About Darwin, Lincoln and Modern Life and Steven Pinker, author of The Blank Slate and many other works, will discuss a fundamental question: How far can Darwin take us as a guide to why we are the way we are?

Both outspoken appreciators of Darwin, Adam Gopnik and Steven Pinker will compare their visions—perhaps complementary, perhaps contrasting—of what Darwin’s legacy is on the two hundredth anniversary of his birth.

About Adam Gopnik

I. FRANK GEHRY in conversation with Barbara Isenberg & Alex Ross II. ESA-PEKKA SALONEN in conversation with Alex Ross PLEASE NOTE Part II has been postponed.

Monday, May 11, 2009, 7 p.m.

Los Angeles conquers New York as two towering California artists, the architect Frank Gehry and the composer and conductor Esa-Pekka Salonen, discuss their work.

Frank Gehry is a transformative figure in the world of architecture. His Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao, Spain, has been called "the world's most celebrated new building" by The New York Times, and his Walt Disney Concert Hall, in Los Angeles, is considered both a visual and an acoustical masterpiece. Projects from Las Vegas to Abu Dhabi are in the works or preparing to open. Having recently celebrated his eightieth birthday, Gehry talks to Barbara Isenberg, author of Conversations with Frank Gehry, and New Yorker music critic Alex Ross about his art of moving forms.

Once in a while an orchestra is lucky enough to form a partnership with a conductor who not only leads great performances but becomes a shaping force in music history. Since 1992, the brilliant Finnish composer and conductor Esa-Pekka Salonen has made the Los Angeles Philharmonic the most interesting orchestra in America; since 2003, Disney Hall has been his musical home. Fresh from his final concert as LA's music director, Salonen talks to Alex Ross about his tenure in LA, his friendship with Gehry, Stravinsky, Radiohead, his own works, and the future of music.

About Frank Gehry

Frank Gehry's architectural career has spanned five decades and produced public and private buildings in America, Europe, and Asia. Notable projects include the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao, Spain; the DZ Bank Building in Berlin; Nationale- Nederlanden Building in Prague; and the Walt Disney Concert Hall in Los Angeles, California. Projects under construction include the Beekman Residential Tower located in New York City, which will be Gehry's first high rise building to be completed.

About Barbara Isenberg

Barbara Isenberg is the author of Conversations with Frank Gehry, which reflects her interviews with the architect over the past 20 years. Other books include Making It Big: The Diary of a Broadway Musical and State of the Arts: California Artists Talk About Their Work. Founder and host of the Getty Center's Art Matters public interviews, she is currently Associate Director of the Los Angeles Institute for the Humanities at the University of Southern California.

About Alex Ross

Alex Ross has been the music critic of The New Yorker since 1996. From 1992 to 1996 he wrote for The New York Times. His first book, The Rest Is Noise: Listening to the Twentieth Century, won a National Book Critics Circle Award and was also a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. In 2008 he was named a MacArthur Fellow.

About Esa-Pekka Salonen

Esa-Pekka Salonen, Finnish conductor and composer, is Music Director of the Los Angeles Philharmonic, a position he will hold until summer 2009. He was recently appointed Principal Conductor of London's Philharmonia and began his tenure in September 2008. Salonen is renowned for his interpretations of contemporary music and has given countless premieres of new as well as his own works. He has led critically acclaimed festivals of music by Berlioz, Ligeti, Schönberg, Shostakovich, and Stravinsky and Magnus Lindberg. His own orchestral works include Foreign Bodies, Insomnia, Wing on Wing, and Helix.

Photos of Frank Gehry by Melissa Majchrzak, Barbara Isenberg by Patricia Williams, Esa-Pekka Salonen by Nicho S?dling, and Alex Ross by David Michalek

How To Win A Cosmic War meets Waltz With Bashir : REZA ASLAN in conversation with ARI FOLMAN Instigated by Paul Holdengräber

Friday, April 24, 2009, 7 p.m.

Winning Without War
A new American president, political change in Israel, and turmoil in the Middle East.

Is there a political solution to Israel-Palestine, Iran, Iraq?

Are we in the midst of a "Cosmic War"?

If politics have failed, what is the alternative?

Two creative minds, writer and scholar of religions Reza Aslan and filmmaker Ari Folman, come together to explore this morass.

Reza Aslan's new book, How To Win A Cosmic War: God, Globalization, and the End of the War on Terror, explodes the cosmic legacy of the Bush years that pitted Christianity against Islam and good against evil and he argues for a dramatic re-orientation in how we think about the ongoing struggle with Islamic extremism. Ari Folman brings his own unique experience in writing and directing his recent Academy Award nominated film, Waltz with Bashir, to demonstrate the remarkable power and authority that art, and especially movies, can have in changing the political conversation.

Reza Aslan and Ari Folman will discuss political and religious wars through the lens of the arts and media taking us beyond the tired realities and offer a way forward.

This event is co-presented by the Office of Cultural Affairs, Consulate General of Israel.

About Reza Aslan

Reza Aslan is assistant professor of creative writing at the University of California, Riverside, and Senior Fellow at the Orfalae Center for Global and International Studies at U.C. Santa Barbara. He is a frequent commentator on CNN, CBS, and NPR, as well as cofounder and creative director of BoomGen Studios, a hub for creative content from and about the Middle East. He is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, the Los Angeles Institute for the Humanities, and the Pacific Council on International Policy. His first book, No god but God, has been translated into thirteen languages. His articles and interviews have appeared in the Boston Globe, New York Times, Los Angeles Times, Sojourners, Sun Magazine, the Guardian, and many other papers around the world. Born in Iran, he now lives in Los Angeles.

About Ari Folman

Ari Folman is a writer, director, and producer. His animated feature film, Waltz with Bashir, was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Foregin film in 2009. Based on a true story, the film is a quest into the director's memory for the missing pieces from the days of the Lebanon War in the mid 80s. Ari Folman and David Polonsky are the authors of the graphic novel, Waltz with Bashir: A Lebanon War Story. Folman has written for several successful Israeli TV series, including the award-winning In Therapy (Be Tipul), which was the basis for the HBO series In Treatment. His other films include Saint Clara, based on a novel by Czech author Pavel Kohout; Made in Israel; and Comfortably Numb.He lives in Israel.

LIVE from the NYPL & BOOKFORUM present A New Series: CULTURAL OBITUARIES The Death of Boom Culture? WALTER BENN MICHAELS with DAVID SIMON, SUSAN STRAIGHT & DALE PECK

Tuesday, April 14, 2009, 7 p.m.

Fiction in the Age of Inequality

Now that markets have proven a flawed index of our economic well being, our cultural life needs to look beyond the pat certainties of laissez faire ideology. Among the ills afflicting the American novel at the height of boom culture, Walter Benn Michaels argues, was a curatorial obsession with past oppressions from slavery to the Holocaust to memoir-style accounts of family abuse. Writers should now be asking less about what it meant to oppose the Holocaust, he contends, and more about what it means to support free trade.

David Simon, creator of The Wire, and Susan Straight, author of Highwire Moon, join Michaels and novelist-critic Dale Peck to discuss the social vision of contemporary storytelling.

 

About Walter Benn Michaels
 

Walter Benn Michaels' most recent books are The Shape of the Signifier and The Trouble with Diversity. Recent articles include "Toutes les in galit's n'offensent pas le candidat Barack Obama" in Le Monde diplomatique and "The Death of a Beautiful Woman" in Interval(le)s.

About Dale Peck

Dale Peck is the author of nine books, most recently, Body Surfing, a novel, and Sprout, which is also a novel, but for teenagers. He teaches in the Graduate Writing Program of the New School.

About David Simon

David Simon's narrative non-fiction works Homicide and The Corner became an NBC drama and a HBO miniseries respectively and subsequently the HBO drama, The Wire. Most recently, Simon was a writer and executive producer of HBO's miniseries Generation Kill. Simon also writes for The New Yorker, Esquire and The Washington Post.

About Susan Straight

Susan Straight is professor of creative writing at the University of California, Riverside. Her fifth novel, Highwire Moon, was a National Book Award finalist and won the Gold Medal for Fiction from the San Francisco-based Commonwealth Club. Straight's other fiction includes The Gettin' Place and Blacker Than a Thousand Midnights.

ANDREI CODRESCU, HENRY ALFORD & MARK TWAIN Interview Each Other! HOW TO LIVE DADA Flash Rosenberg & Max rada dada perform!

Monday, April 13, 2009, 7 p.m.

An evening of gentlemen bearing questions and channeling the great books that will answer them! Also, elder aerialist sages, minstrels, and the Dance of the Seven Veils! Tristan Tzara and Charlie Chaplin will be in the audience!

Andrei Codrescu's new book, The Posthuman Dada Guide: Tzara and Lenin Play Chess, will be Codrescu's chief oracle in this orgy of bibliomania. Codrescu was introduced to Mark Twain by Nikola Tesla in the novel Messia@.

Is old age a form of Dada expression? At what point does "eccentric" turn into "Dadaist?" Recounting examples of odd behavior from Henry Alford's new book, How to Live: A Search for Wisdom from Old People (While They Are Still on This Earth), characters like Eugene Loh, a retired aerospace engineer who uses an emptied Frosted Flakes box as his briefcase, they will talk about how old age can be a wonderful time to become Dada. Paul Holdengräber will make a cameo appearance as Mark Twain.

Projected REAL TIME conversation drawing by Flash Rosenberg and "Unexceptional Tricks" by Max rada dada

About Henry Alford

Henry Alford is the author of How to Live: A Search for Wisdom from Old People (While They Are Still on This Earth). He has written for the New Yorker, Vanity Fair, and the New York Times for more than a decade.

About Andrei Codrescu

Andrei Codrescu's new books are The Posthuman Dada Guide: Tzara and Lenin Play Chess and Jealous Witness: New Poems. He is the author of forty books of poetry, fiction, and essays, and the founder of Exquisite Corpse: A Journal of Life & Letters. He received a Peabody award for the PBS version of his film Road Scholar. He has been a commentator on NPR's All Things Considered since 1983.

About Mark Twain

By the end of his life in 1910, Samuel Langhorne Clemens (Mark Twain) published more than 30 books, hundreds of short stories and essays, and gave lecture tours around the world. Twain's new book is Who Is Mark Twain? by Mark Twain Himself, Never Before Published!

Artists:

About Flash Rosenberg

Flash Rosenberg is a freelance photographer and Artist-in-Residence for LIVE from the NYPL. She draws discussions in front of live audiences to create real time Conversation Portraits. These drawings are an amorphous portrait of what it feels like to translate complex ideas into simple lines. She squeezes 90-minute blabs into 5-to-8 minute animations, which may be seen on the LIVE website.

About Max rada dada

Max rada dada has performed in the 2005 New York Fringe Festival and has been touring the country ever since with his Sideshow of ?Unexceptional Tricks? performing at Intuit in Chicago, Blue Star Contemporary in San Antonio, Ohio University, and Houston's Art Car Parade among others. His performance at the Library is part of his "Veil of Happiness" Sideshow Detour 2009 in NYC.

LIVE from the NYPL & BOOKFORUM present A New Series: CULTURAL OBITUARIES The Death of Black Nationalist Culture? TA-NEHISI COATES, BAZ DREISINGER, PENIEL E. JOSEPH & VICTOR LAVALLE

Thursday, April 9, 2009, 7 p.m.

Making Sense of Black Nationalism in the Obama Era

With an African-American president in the White House and the first black chairman voted to head the Republican National Committee has black nationalism become irrelevant? Novelist Victor LaValle explores the personal and political valences of the nationalist idea, and makes a case for embracing a more ecumenical view of black experience?including the freedom to move beyond traditional conceptions of blackness. Baz Dreisinger, author of Near Black: White to Black Passing in American Culture; Peniel E. Joseph, author of Waiting 'Til the Midnight Hour: A Narrative History of Black Power in America; and Atlantic Monthly contributing editor Ta-Nehisi Coates respond.

About Ta-Nehisi Coates

Ta-Nehisi Coates is a contributing editor for The Atlantic. He lives in Harlem with his partner and his son.

About Baz Dreisinger

Baz Dreisinger is the author of Near Black: White to Black Passing in American Culture. She teaches at John Jay College of Criminal Justice. Together with Oscar-nominated filmmaker Peter Spirer, she produced and wrote the documentary Black & Blue: Legends of the Hip-Hop Cop, which investigates the New York Police Department?s monitoring of the hip-hop industry.

About Peniel E. Joseph

Peniel E. Joseph is associate professor of Afro-American Studies and history at Brandeis University. He is author of Waiting 'Til the Midnight Hour: A Narrative History of Black Power in America. His book Dark Days, Bright Nights: From Black Power to Barack Obama will be published in 2010.

About Victor LaValle

Victor LaValle is the author of Slapboxing with Jesus and The Ecstatic. His novel, Big Machine, will be published in 2009.

THOMAS FRIEDMAN in conversation with NANDAN NILEKANI Imagining India

Monday, March 23, 2009, 7 p.m.

In his book, Imaging India, Indian entrepreneur Nandan Nilekani traces the central ideas that shaped the country's past and present and asks the key question of the future of India and its role as a global citizen and emerging economic giant: How will India as a global power avoid the mistakes of earlier development models? Its future rests on more than simply economic growth; it also depends on reform and innovation in all sectors of public life.

Author and New York Times journalist Thomas Friedman says, Seattle has Bill. Bangalore has Nandan. . . . What makes Nilekani unique? For me it comes down to one phrase: great explainer. . . . It was his insight that the global playing field was being "leveled" by technology that inspired me to write the book The World Is Flat.?

About Thomas Friedman

Thomas Friedman, author and journalist, is a three-time Pulitzer Prize winner. His Foreign Affairs column appears every Wednesday and Sunday in The New York Times. Friedman is the author of From Beirut to Jerusalem, The Lexus and the Olive Tree: Understanding Globalization, Longitudes and Attitudes: Exploring the World After September 11, The World Is Flat, and most recently, Hot, Flat and Crowded: Why We Need a Green Revolution and How it Can Renew America. Friedman was named one of America's Best Leaders by U.S. News & World Report.

About Nandan Nilekani

Nandan Nilekani is the Co-Chairman of Infosys Technologies Limited. He is the recipient of several awards, including the prestigious Joseph Schumpeter prize for innovative services in economy, economic sciences and politics. Nilekani was listed as one of the 100 most influential people in the world by Time in 2006 and was named Forbes Businessman of the Year  for Asia in 2007. Nilekani received his bachelor's degree in electrical engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology in Bombay, India.

A Tribute to JOHN UPDIKE

Thursday, March 19, 2009, 7 p.m.

Colleagues, friends, and family of John Updike, who died January 27, will gather to pay tribute to a titan of American literature.

David Remnick, Sonny Mehta, Charles McGrath, Judith Jones, Roger Angell, Lorrie Moore, Adam Gopnik, Deborah Garrison, Ann Goldstein, ZZ Packer, and David Updike will honor John Updike's life with remembrances and readings from his work.

Updike, the author of more than sixty books?including twenty-two novels, fifteen short-story collections, seven collections of poetry, and five children?s books?was the winner of two Pulitzer Prizes and two National Book Awards. He is probably best remembered for his quartet of novels featuring Harry "Rabbit" Angstrom, the first of which, Rabbit, Run, was published by Alfred A. Knopf in 1960, and the last, Rabbit at Rest, published in 1990.

In his half century writing for The New Yorker, he contributed fiction, poetry, essays, and criticism to the magazine; more than seventy of his book reviews and essays are collected in ?Due Considerations.? Before he died, Updike delivered the manuscripts for three new books, all of which will be published before the end of this year.

This event is co-presented by Alfred A. Knopf and The New Yorker

About Roger Angell

Roger Angell has been a contributor to The New Yorker since 1944 and is now a senior editor and staff writer at the magazine. His writing has appeared in many anthologies and has been collected in nine books, most recently Let Me Finish, a collection of his memoir writing.

About Deborah Garrison

Deborah Garrison is the author of The Second Child -- Poems and A Working Girl Can't Win. She worked on the editorial staff of The New Yorker for fifteen years and is the poetry editor of Alfred A. Knopf and a senior editor at Pantheon Books.

About Ann Goldstein

Ann Goldstein joined The New Yorker in 1974 and is the head of the copy department. She worked with John Updike on his critical pieces for more than twenty years.

About Adam Gopnik

Adam Gopnik has been writing for The New Yorker since 1986. He is the author of Paris to the Moon, The King in the Window, Through the Children?s Gate: A Home in New York, and, most recently, Angels and Ages: A Short Book about Darwin, Lincoln, and Modern Life.

About Judith Jones

Judith Jones is Senior Editor and Vice President at Alfred A. Knopf. She is the author of The Tenth Muse.

About Sonny Mehta

Sonny Mehta is Chairman and Editor in Chief of the Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group, which includes Alfred A. Knopf, Pantheon, Schocken, Everyman?s Library, Doubleday, Nan A. Talese, Vintage, Anchor, and Vintage Espa?ol; all are imprints of Random House, Inc.

About Charles McGrath

Charles McGrath is the former editor of the New York Times Book Review and a former editor at The New Yorker and contributes frequently to the New York Times Magazine, Golf Digest, and other publications.

About Lorrie Moore

Lorrie Moore is the author of the short story collections, Self Help, Like Life, and Birds of America. Her novels are Anagrams and Who Will Run the Frog Hospital? Her work appears in The New Yorker and The New York Times, among others.

About ZZ Packer

ZZ Packer is the author of the short story collection Drinking Coffee Elsewhere, whose title story appeared in The New Yorker's 2000 Summer Fiction Issue. Her work has been anthologized in The Best American Short Stories 2000 and 25 and Under: Fiction.

About David Remnick

David Remnick was named editor of The New Yorker in 1998. He is the author of Lenin's Tomb, Resurrection, The Devil Problem (and Other True Stories), King of the World, and, most recently, Reporting: Writings from The New Yorker. He has edited five anthologies of New Yorker pieces.

About David Updike

David Updike is a teacher of English at Roxbury Community College, in Boston. He has written several books, and a collection of short stories, Old Girlfriends, will be published in Summer 2009. He lives with his wife, Wambui, and son, Wesley, in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

FATHER PATRICK DESBOIS in conversation with Paul LeClerc Holocaust by Bullets

Tuesday, March 3, 2009, 6 p.m.

The Holocaust by Bullets: A Priest's Journey to Uncover the Truth Behind the Murder of 1.5 Million Jews is Father Patrick Desbois story of his heroic mission to investigate the murder of Ukrainian Jews by Nazis during World War II. His team visited the sites of these murders, and interviewed surviving witnesses, many of whom were recruited by the Germans to assist in the executions.

Father Desbois, secretary to the French Conference of Bishops for relations with Judaism and advisor to the Vatican on the Jewish Religion, will discuss with Paul LeClerc, President of The New York Public Library, the stories he has uncovered about the first mass killings of the Holocaust that most people know nothing about.

About Father Patrick Desbois

Father Patrick Desbois is secretary to the French Conference of Bishops for relations with Judaism, advisor to the Cardinal-Archbishop of Lyon, and advisor to the Vatican on the Jewish religion. Grandson of a deportee to the Rawa Ruska camp, he has set out to investigate the mass murder of Eastern European Jews by the Nazis during the Second World War. He is the winner of the B'nai B'rith International Award for Outstanding Contribution to Relations with the Jewish People. He is author of the new book The Holocaust by Bullets: A Priest's Journey to Uncover the Truth Behind the Murder of 1.5 Million Jews. He lives in Paris, France.

About Paul LeClerc

Paul LeClerc is the President and Chief Executive Officer of The New York Public Library, which consists of 91 libraries that serve a more varied set of constituencies and has the broadest mission of any library in the nation. He is the author or co-editor of five scholarly volumes on writers of the French Enlightenment and his contributions to French culture earned him the Order of the Academic Palms (Officier) in 1989 and the French Legion of Honor (Chevalier) in 1996. Dr. LeClerc is currently a trustee of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the J. Paul Getty Trust, the Carroll and Milton Petrie Foundation, the American Academy in Rome, Union College, and The National Book Foundation.

LIVE from the NYPL & WIRED present LAWRENCE LESSIG SHEPARD FAIREY STEVEN JOHNSON Remix: Making Art and Commerce Thrive in the Hybrid Economy

Thursday, February 26, 2009, 6 p.m.

What is the future for art and ideas in an age when practically anything can be copied, pasted, downloaded, sampled, and re-imagined?

LIVE from the NYPL and WIRED Magazine kick off the Spring 2009 season with a spirited discussion of the emerging remix culture. Our guides through this new world?who will take us from Jefferson's Bible to André the Giant to Wikipedia?will be Lawrence Lessig, author of Remix, founder of Creative Commons, and one of the leading legal scholars on intellectual property issues in the Internet age; acclaimed street artist Shepard Fairey, whose iconic Obama "HOPE" poster was recently acquired by the National Portrait Gallery; and cultural historian Steven Johnson, whose new book, The Invention of Air, argues that remix culture has deep roots in the Enlightenment and among the American founding fathers.

DANIEL BARENBOIM in conversation with Paul Holdengräber Music Quickens Time

Tuesday, December 9, 2008, 6 p.m.

Virtuoso pianist and conductor Daniel Barenboim in his new book, Music Quickens Time, draws on his profound engagement with music to argue its urgent value and importance in our everyday lives. While we may sometimes think of personal, social, and political issues as existing independently of each other, Barenboim shows with bravura and passion how music teaches us that this is impossible.

Drawing on his own involvement with Palestine in a conversation with Paul Holdengräber, Barenboim will examine the transformative power of music in the world, from his own performances of Wagner in Israel, his friendship with Edward Said, to the creation of the internationally acclaimed West-Eastern Divan Orchestra, which continues to bring together young musicians from Egypt, Syria, Lebanon, Jordan, Tunisia, and Israel to make music. Barenboim describes first-hand how music offers us a way to explore differences and at times resolve some of the most seemingly intractable issues of our times.

About Daniel Barenboim

Daniel Barenboim is one of the most prominent musicians of the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries, as both pianist and conductor. After 15 years conducting the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, he is now principal guest conductor of the La Scala opera house in Milan, Italy. He has received numerous Grammy awards, and is the author of A Life in Music, and, co-authored with Edward Said, Parallels and Paradoxes. He was a UN Ambassador for Peace and has received many awards including the Goethe Medal, the Royal Philharmonic Society Gold Medal, the Praemium Imperiale, and the Wolf Prize in Arts.

Paul Holdengräber

Paul Holdengräber is the Director of Public Programs known as "LIVE from the NYPL" for The Research Libraries of The New York Public Library.

ZADIE SMITH Speaking in Tongues

Friday, December 5, 2008, 6 p.m.

The Robert B. Silvers Lecture

What does it mean when we speak in different ways to different people? Is it a sign of duplicity or the mark of a complex sensibility? Zadie Smith takes a look at register and tone, from the academy to the streets, through black and white, with examples (Elizabeth I, Shakespeare, Humbert Humbert, Obama).

About Zadie Smith

Zadie Smith was born in North London in 1975. Her first novel, White Teeth, won the Guardian First Book Award, the Whitbread First Novel Award, the Commonwealth Writers Prize, and the Orange Prize for Fiction. Smith's other works include The Autograph Man and On Beauty. She has also written a non-fiction book about writing entitled Fail Better.

About The Robert B. Silvers Lecture

The Robert B. Silvers Lecture is an annual series created by Max Palevsky in recognition of the work of Robert B. Silvers, editor of The New York Review of Books, of which he was a founder in 1963. The series features contemporary people whose fields correspond to the broad range of Mr. Silver?s interests in literature, the arts, politics, economics, history, and the sciences.

AVRAHAM BURG in conversation with OMER BARTOV The HOLOCAUST IS OVER; We Must Rise From Its Ashes

Monday, December 1, 2008, 6 p.m.

Modern day Israel and the Jewish community are strongly influenced by the memory and horrors of Hitler and the Holocaust. In his book, The Holocaust is Over; We Must Rise From Its Ashes, Avraham Burg argues that the Jewish nation has been traumatized and has lost the ability to trust itself, its neighbors, or the world around it. He seeks to show that this is one of the causes for the growing nationalism and violence that are plaguing Israeli society and reverberating through Jewish communities worldwide. Burg uses his own family history to inform his views on what the Jewish people need to do to move on and eventually live in peace with their Arab neighbors and feel comfortable in world at large.

The distinguished historian Omer Bartov, author of Hitler's Army: Soldiers, Nazis, and War in the Third Reich, will be in conversation with Avraham Burg to address some of these claims:

  • The Holocaust is Over is very critical of Zionism as it was implemented in Israel and Jewish nationalism more generally. Is Burg in general an opponent of nationalism, or does he simply think that it negates the historical role he envisions for Jews?
  • Burg is critical of the nationalist myths upon which Zionism was founded; at the same time he professes a strong commitment to Jewish history going back to Biblical times. How does Burg square the circle of basing his anti-Zionist stance -- whereby he opposes fascist-like mythologies of blood and soil -- on a belief in Jewish destiny, fate, and universal mission. Does Burg consider himself a patriot?
  • Burg seems to imply that Israel?or the Jews?should fulfill the role of being a beacon to the nations. Does this mean he sees Israel not as a normal state and the Jews not as a normal nation, but as a chosen people?
  • Burg argues that Israel should stop speaking about the Holocaust as a political tool and drop the rhetoric of "never again." What role does he attribute to the rhetoric of "never again" vis-a-vis the numerous genocides that have occurred since 1945 and are still going on today, and does he think that Jews and Israelis have a special duty to fight against such mass murders?
  • Burg implies (like Tony Judt) that while Israel was created with the intention of removing the main cause for antisemitism it has now become the main reason for it. What to his mind would effectively remove the causes of antisemitism?   

About Omer Bartov

Omer Bartov is the John P. Birkelund Distinguished Professor of European History at Brown University. He has been awarded fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the American Academy in Berlin, the Guggenheim Foundation, and others. He is the author of Hitler's Army: Soldiers, Nazis, and War in the Third Reich, The "Jew" in Cinema, and Erased: Vanishing Traces of Jewish Galicia in Present-Day Ukraine. He is currently writing a history of the town of Buczacz in Eastern Galicia.

About Avrum Burg

Avrum Burg is the author of The Holocaust is Over; We Must Rise from its Ashes, which Tony Judt has called "An important book by a very courageous man." A former Speaker of the Knesset in Israel, he has been active in politics as a leader in the Labor Party and the One Israel party. His article in The Guardian entitled "The End of Zionism" was widely read and debated. He lives with his wife in Nataf, a small village outside Jerusalem.

A Tribute to RUST HILLS Will Blythe, Byron Dobell, Lee Eisenberg, Richard Ford, Beverly Lowry, Terry McDonell & Jim Salter

Friday, November 14, 2008, 6 p.m.

Rust Hills, the celebrated and storied fiction editor of Esquire, in that magazine's last golden era as a publisher of great literary fiction, died in August 2008, at the age of 83.

Rust Hills edited, befriended and brought to American readers a generation's worth of first-rate literary talent. Among the writers Rust Hills edited and encouraged were James Salter, Jim Harrison, Richard Ford, Bruce Jay Friedman, Annie Proulx, Raymond Carver, Thomas McGuane, Jayne Anne Phillips, Francisco Goldman, Robert Stone, Ann Beattie, and Tobias Wolff.

From the 1950's well into the 1990's, Rust Hills' name, his wide literary appreciation, his?at times courtly, remarkably convivial, and decidedly mid-century public self?was not only a significant presence behind American's understanding of what extraordinary fiction looked like; but he was, as well, a generous, loyal, fastidious (and occasionally infuriating) blue-pencil editor, who month-upon-month inspired young story-writers and novelists in the direction of their very best work.

Rust Hills was perhaps one of the last of a great breed of New York fiction editors who once enriched our reading and cultural life.

Join Will Blythe, Byron Dobell, Lee Eisenberg, Richard Ford, Beverly Lowry, Terry McDonell, and James Salter, as they pay tribute to Rust Hills.

About Will Blythe

Will Blythe is the author of To Hate Like This is to be Happy Forever, and a former colleague of Rust Hills at Esquire.

About Byron Dobell

Byron Dobell was the managing editor of Esquire in the Sixties when Rust Hills was its fiction editor. He was also editorial director of New York magazine, managing editor of Life, and editor of American Heritage. He is now a portraitist.

About Lee Eisenberg

Lee Eisenberg is a former editor-in-chief of Esquire. His most recent book, The Number, a New York Times bestseller, was published in 2006.

About Richard Ford

Richard Ford is the author of six novels and three collections of stories. He was awarded the Pulitzer Prize and the PEN/Faulkner Award for Independence Day and the PEN/Malamud Award for excellence in short fiction.

About Beverly Lowry

Beverly Lowry is the author of six novels and three nonfiction works, including Crossed Over. She teaches at George Mason University, and credits Rust Hills with her start in publishing.

About Terry McDonell

Terry McDonell worked with Rust Hills at Esquire, where he was editor in chief from 1990 to 1993. He is now Time Inc. Group Editor, overseeing Sports Illustrated and a number of other magazines and websites; and serves as president of the board of the Paris Review.

About James Salter

James Salter is a novelist (A Sport and a Pastime, Light Years) and short story writer (Dusk, Last Night) many of whose stories were published in Esquire when Rust Hills was literary editor. He won the PEN/Faulkner in 1989.

CAROL SHIELDS: The Stone Diaries A 15th Anniversary Celebration Sara Botsford, Anne Giardini, Martin Levin, Sarah McNally, Shelagh Rogers, Donald Shields, David Staines, Jane Urquhart & Meg Wolitzer

Thursday, November 13, 2008, 6 p.m.

"...Memory gets smoothed down with time, everything flattened by the iron of acceptance and rejection."

"The recounting of life is a cheat, of course; I admit the truth of this; even our own stories are obscenely distorted; it is a wonder really that we keep faith with the simple container of our existence."

----Carol Shields

The Stone Diaries

The Stone Diaries is Carol Shields' most celebrated work and is the poignant story of Daisy Goodwill Flett, a woman who struggles to understand the contradictions that make up her life. This fictional biography spans over a century and begins with Daisy entering the world as her mother takes her last breath. As narrator, Daisy shows us a bird's eye view of her journey from her motherless childhood through a maze of self development and yearning for identity, two marriages, children, an unexpected career as columnist, later decline into illness and finally old age as Daisy sustains her last years in infirmity.

The richness of Daisy?s vividly described internal life transforms this seemingly ordinary tale. Carol Shields displays her compassion, insight and honest humor through a subtle, but affecting portrait of an everywoman reflecting on an unconventional existence. No life, however seemingly small, is without significance.

About Carol Shields

Carol Shields (1935-2003) was an American-born Canadian and the author of numerous novels and short story collections. The Stone Diaries won the Pulitzer Prize for fiction in 1995, the National Book Critics Circle Award, and Canada?s Governor General?s Award. Her other novels and short story collections include The Republic of Love, Happenstance, Swann, The Orange Fish, Various Miracles, The Box Garden, and Small Ceremonies. She is the recipient of a Canada Council Major Award, two National Magazine Awards, The Orange Prize for Fiction (1997, 2003), and the 1993 Booker Prize. Carol Shields died in 2003 from breast cancer.

About Sara Botsford

Sara Botsford is a Canadian actress. She is probably best known for her role of Ann Hildebrand in the television series E.N.G.. In 2002 Sara portrayed Kathleen Sinclair in the TV movie Trudeau about the life of the late Prime Minister Pierre Elliott Trudeau.

About Anne Giardini

Anne Giardini has written and published essays, stories, and articles on many topics and was a columnist for the National Post, one of Canada's national newspapers. Her first novel was The Sad Truth About Happiness. Advice for Italian Boys is scheduled for publication in early 2009. Anne Giardini is the daughter of Carol Shields and lives in Vancouver with her husband and three children.

About Martin Levin

Martin Levin is the books editor of The Globe and Mail in Toronto, Canada's largest weekly books section. He is also a contributor to a number of anthologies, most recently Great Expectations: Twenty-Four True Stories about Childbirth.

About Sarah McNally

Sarah McNally owns and operates McNally Jackson Books in downtown Manhattan, the largest general independent in New York City. She worked as an editor before opening her store in 2004. McNally is a native of Winnipeg, Canada, Carol Shields' home town, where her parents and sister are booksellers. She now lives in Brooklyn with her husband and son.

About Shelagh Rogers

Shelagh Rogers is a Canadian radio host for The Next Chapter on CBC Radio One, a weekly tour into the world of Canadian literature. Rogers is an advocate for mental health and received a Transforming Lives Award in May 2008. For over twenty two years, she has volunteered for Frontier College, Canada's largest literacy network and she hosts an annual Bonspiel for Literacy. Shelagh Rogers lives in Vancouver.

About Donald Shields

Don Shields has a Ph.D. in civil engineering and served as Dean of Engineering at The University of Manitoba. In 1957 he married Carol Warner and they had five children; John, Anne, Catherine, Meg and Sara. The couple was married for 46 years and lived in Canada until Carol Shields' death in 2003. Don Shields now lives in New York, Victoria, and France with Arlette Baker.

About David Staines

David Staines is an authority on medieval literature and culture and studies and writes about Canadian literature and culture. He is the author and editor of more than fifteen books and is currently Interim Director of the Institute of Canadian Studies at the University of Ottawa. Staines wrote the introduction to Carol Shields? holdings at the National Library of Canada.

About Jane Urquhart

Jane Urquhart has published poetry, I'm Walking in the Garden of His Imaginary Palace, False Shuffles, and The Little Flowers of Madame de Montespan; novels, The Whirlpool, Changing Heaven, Away, and The Underpainter; and a collection of short fiction, Storm Glass. Her fifth novel, The Stonecarvers was shortlisted for the Giller prize. The author lives in a Southwestern Ontario village with her husband.

About Meg Wolitzer

Meg Wolitzer is the author of eight novels, including The Ten-Year Nap, The Wife, and The Position. Wolitzer?s short fiction has appeared in The Best American Short Stories, and she has taught writing at The University of Iowa Writer's Workshop and Columbia University. She lives in New York with her husband and sons.

TONI MORRISON in conversation with FRAN LEBOWITZ

Wednesday, November 12, 2008, 6 p.m.

Nobel Prize recipient Toni Morrison uses fantasy, a sinuous poetic style, and a rich interweaving of the mythic in her writing to reveal the black American experience. She tells the stories of her characters and their struggle to find themselves and their cultural identity in an unjust society.

A Mercy, Morrison?s ninth novel, uncovers what lies beneath the surface of slavery in an ambivalent, disturbing story of a mother abandoning her daughter in order to save her. Like her novel Beloved, the story takes place in the American past. Set in the 17th century northeast when the slave trade was in its infancy, her characters provide a detailed look at the social environment of religious persecution and racial hatred, and the class distinction that allowed the institution of slavery to take root in the US.

Toni Morrison and Fran Lebowitz explore together how the broad strokes of history impact the personal choices of the individuals caught in history?s reach.

This event is sponsored by

About Toni Morrison

Toni Morrison has been the recipient of the Nobel Prize in Literature, the Pulitzer Prize, and the National Book Critics Circle Award. Her novels include Song of Solomon, Beloved, Paradise, and Love. She is the Robert F. Goheen Professor of Humanities Emeritus at Princeton University. She lives in Rockland County, New York, and Princeton, New Jersey.

About Fran Lebowitz

Fran Lebowitz is the author of the two critically acclaimed New York Times best-sellers Metropolitan Life and Social Studies and the children?s book Mr. Chas and Lisa Sue Meet the Pandas. She is also the author of the half-finished cult novel Exterior Signs of Wealth and the absolutely almost completed book-length essay Progress.

The Cullman Center for Scholars & Writers & LIVE present WHAT HAPPENS NOW? A Conversation on the 2008 Election Andrew Delbanco, Joan Didion, Jeff Madrick, Darryl Pinckney, Michael Tomasky & Garry Wills Moderated by Robert Silvers

Monday, November 10, 2008, 6 p.m.

As The New York Review of Books turns 45, the evening will feature some of the publication's most illustrious contributors including former Cullman Center Fellow and Melville scholar Andrew Delbanco; journalist, essayist, and novelist Joan Didion; author and economistJeff Madrick; writer Darryl Pinckney; journalist Michael Tomasky; historian Garry Wills; and others. Moderated by The New York Review of Books editor Robert B. Silvers.

This event is co-presented with

About Andrew Delbanco

 Andrew Delbanco is the Julian Clarence Levi Professor Chair in the Humanities and Director of the American Studies program at Columbia University. His most recent book is Melville: His World and Work. Hailed as ?America?s Best Social Critic? by Time Magazine, Delbanco, writes regularly for The New York Review of Books, The New Republic, The New York Times Magazine, and other journals. He was a member of the inaugural class of fellows at the Library?s Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers. Delbanco?s new book, College: What it Was, Is, and Should Be, will be published in 2010.

About Joan Didion

Joan Didion is a journalist, essayist, and novelist. She has been a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books since 1973 and is the author of, most recently, The Year of Magical Thinking, winner of the 2005 National Book Award for nonfiction, and We Tell Ourselves Stories in Order to Live: Collected Nonfiction.

About Jeff Madrick

Jeff Madrick is a former economics columnist for The New York Times and editor of Challenge Magazine. He has been a contributor to The New York Review of Books for more than a dozen years, is visiting professor of humanities at The Cooper Union and senior fellow of the Schwartz Center for Economic Policy Analysis, The New School. His latest book is The Case for Big Government.

About Darryl Pinckney

Darryl Pinckney is a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books and is the author of the novel, High Cotton, which won the Los Angeles Times Book Prize for First Fiction; Out There: Mavericks of Black Literature; and Sold and Gone: African American Literature and U.S. Society. He received the Vursell Award for Distinguished Prose from the American Academy of Arts and Letters in 1994.

About Robert B. Silvers

Robert B. Silvers is the editor of The New York Review of Books. He was a founding co-editor with Barbara Epstein with whom he worked for over forty years, beginning in 1963, until her death in 2006. He has edited several essay anthologies featuring New York Review contributors, including The Consequences to Come: American Power After Bush in 2008.

About Michael Tomasky

Michael Tomasky is Editor of Guardian America, The Guardian's American Website. He is also a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books. Tomasky is the author of Left for Dead: The Life, Death, and Possible Resurrection of Progressive Politics in America, a study of the intellectual collapse of the American left, and of Hillary's Turn: Inside Her Improbable, Victorious Senate Campaign, a chronicle of Clinton's successful 2000 election to the Senate.

About Garry Wills

Garry Wills is the author of What Jesus Meant, What Paul Meant, Papal Sin, and Why I am a Catholic. He is the translator of Saint Augustine?s Confessions and author of The Rosary. His works on American history have received many awards, including the Pulitzer Prize for Lincoln at Gettysburg. He writes for The New York Review of Books and is Professor of History Emeritus at Northwestern University. His new book is What The Gospels Meant.

NEW YORK CITY OPERA & LIVE present Opera Matters! "The Sound of Literature"

Wednesday, November 5, 2008, 6 p.m.

"The Sound of Literature": Creative vistas on the remarkable intersection of words and music.

Co-presented with New York City Opera's Opera Matters! series.

An Evening with DRACULA

Thursday, October 30, 2008, 7 p.m.

Beware of The New Annotated Dracula! After his New Annotated Sherlock Holmes, Leslie Klinger returns with a daring conceit: the Dracula tale is based on historical fact. Klinger?s research took him to the Rosenbach Library in Philadelphia, where Stoker?s notes are housed, and to Seattle to spend two days with the guarded manuscript (Microsoft billionaire Paul Allen is the owner). He points out errors and inconsistencies in the narrative that reveal the truth: that Stoker covered up the real story of the Harkers? travels and the real location of Castle Dracula and invented Dracula?s supposed death.

Be prepared on the eve of Halloween to travel through two hundred years of popular culture and myth as well as the graveyards and the wilds of Transylvania as Klinger, the superb literary detective, investigates the multifarious subtexts of the original narrative?from the masochistic to the necrophilic. Die-hard Dracula fans will not be disappointed by the vampire-prince. The actress Zoe Caldwell will do a reading.

About Leslie Klinger

Leslie Klinger is considered to be one of the world?s foremost authorities on twin icons of the Victorian era, Sherlock Holmes and Dracula. He is the editor of the three-volume collection of the short stories and novels, The New Annotated Sherlock Holmes, winner of the Edgar Award for Best Critical/Biographical Work and nominated for every other major award in the mystery genre. He lives in Los Angeles, California.

About Zoe Caldwell

Zoe Caldwell has performed in major theaters around the world, working with many of the greatest actors, writers and directors of the 20th Century, including Charles Laughton, Albert Finney, Edith Evans, Paul Robeson and Laurence Olivier. She has won four Tony Awads for Slapstick Tragedy, The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie, Medea and Master Class. She is author of I Will Be Cleopatra, a memoir.

WIRED & LIVE present GRANT ACHATZ & NATHAN MYHRVOLD Moderated by Mark McClusky The Cutting Edge: Tales from the Culinary Frontier

Wednesday, October 29, 2008, 7 p.m.

James Beard-award winning chef Grant Achatz and sous vide guru Nathan Myhrvold will explore the ways that science and technology are transforming our notions of food. Using new tools and techniques, top chefs are creating dishes that range from the simply delicious to the otherworldly, challenging both the mind and palate. Kitchens, once the home of stoves, food processors and not much else, are becoming more like laboratories, stocked with centrifuges and canisters of liquid nitrogen.

Grant Achatz is the chef and owner of Alinea restaurant in Chicago. Nathan Myhrvold is the CEO of Intellectual Ventures and former CTO of Microsoft. Wired senior editor Mark McClusky will moderate the discussion.

This event is co-presented with 

 

About Grant Achatz

Grant Achatz is the chef and owner of Alinea. Food & Wine named him one of the Best New Chefs in 2002. He received the James Beard Rising Star Chef award in 2003; the Best Chef/Great Lakes award in 2007; and the top James Beard honor, Outstanding Chef in the United States, in 2008. Before opening Alinea in 2005, Achatz was sous chef at the French Laundry in Yountville, CA, and the executive chef of Trio in Chicago. His new book is Alinea

About Mark McClusky

Mark McClusky is a Wired senior editor. He has written extensively about food and technology, including a feature profile of Achatz, and a look at Myhrvold's sous vide research. He is one of the authors of Alinea, the first cookbook from Achatz's restaurant. McClusky directs gear and gadget coverage at Wired.

About Nathan Myhrvold

Nathan Myhrvold is chief executive officer and a founder of Intellectual Ventures, a firm dedicated to creating and investing in invention. When he's not encouraging innovation in others, Myhrvold is an active inventor with nearly 300 patents issued or pending, including several related to food technology. Before founding Intellectual Ventures, Myhrvold was the first chief technology officer at Microsoft, where he helped develop Microsoft Windows and Office and founded Microsoft Research.

CAN THE ECONOMY BE SAVED? How We Got Here and What We Must Do Now FELIX ROHATYN, NOURIEL ROUBINI & JEFFREY SACHS Moderated by CHARLIE ROSE

Tuesday, October 28, 2008, 7 p.m.

A LIVE from the NYPL forum on the global economic crisis with three leading authorities:

Nouriel Roubini (NYU) was one of the earliest and most persistent economists warning us of the housing bubble leading to our present financial calamities. Jeffrey Sachs (Columbia) has dealt with financial crisis over a quarter century in all parts of the world. Felix Rohatyn is famed as the man who saved NYC from its financial crisis of the 1970s as well as a leading financier, diplomat, and voice for public responsibility. This conversation, moderated by Charlie Rose, among these three experts will enable the public to join in a unique reasoned and detailed discussion of the origins and perhaps solutions to the current upheaval.

This event is sponsored by

About Felix Rohatyn

Felix Rohatyn served as United States Ambassador to France from 1997 to 2000 and is a Commander in the French Legion of Honor. Prior to his appointment as Ambassador in Paris, Rohatyn was a managing director of the investment-banking firm Lazard Fr?res & Co. LLC in New York. From 1975 to 1993, he was chairman of the Municipal Assistance Corporation (MAC) of the State of New York, where he managed the negotiations that enabled New York City to resolve its financial crisis in the late seventies. He served as a member of the Board of Governors of the New York Stock Exchange from 1968 to 1972. Felix Rohatyn is currently the President of FGR Associates LLC, a firm that provides financial advice to corporations.

About Nouriel Roubini

Nouriel Roubini is Professor of Economics at the Stern School of Business, New York University and Chairman of RGE Monitor, an economic and geo-strategic information service named one of the best economics websites by Business Week, Forbes, the Wall Street Journal, and The Economist. Roubini is an internationally known expert in the field of international macroeconomics and has served as a senior adviser to the White House Council of Economic Advisers and the U.S. Treasury Department. Roubini has published numerous policy papers and books on key international macroeconomic issues; and is regularly cited as an authority in the media.

   
 

About Jeffrey Sachs

Jeffrey Sachs is Director of The Earth Institute at Columbia University and Special Advisor to United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon. Sachs is widely considered to be the leading international economic advisor of his generation. For more than 20 years he has been in the forefront of the challenges of economic development, poverty alleviation, and enlightened globalization, promoting policies to help all parts of the world to benefit from expanding economic opportunities and wellbeing. In 2005, Sachs was named one of the 100 most influential people in the world by Time Magazine, and the World Affairs Council of America identified him as one of the 500 most influential people in the United States in the field of foreign policy. His books include Common Wealth: Economics for a Crowded Planet and The End of Poverty.

About Charlie Rose

Emmy award-winning journalist Charlie Rose is executive editor and anchor of Charlie Rose, the nightly one-hour interview program that engages in one-on-one in-depth conversation and round table discussions about important issues and ideas of our time. Since 1991, Charlie Rose has become a unique venue for individuals in politics, performing arts, literature, film, science, medicine, and business. Rose has received numerous journalistic awards and honorary degrees. He is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations. He has also agreed to be a contributor to CBS News 60 Minutes.

LIVE from the NYPL presents "DEAD from the NYPL" The Perverse Pleasures of Obituaries: ANN WROE, MARILYN JOHNSON & DANIEL OKRENT Instigated by Paul Holdengräber

Monday, October 27, 2008, 7 p.m.

While a chill has crept into the evening air, and Halloween and the Days of the Dead are upon us, Ann Wroe, co-author of The Economist Book of Obituaries and its current editor of some of the best obituaries in the world, discusses the making of obituaries, their thrills and pitfalls, their rewards, and their insidious influence with Marilyn Johnson, who has studied the art and peculiar habits of obituary writers around the world and is author of The Dead Beat: Lost Souls, Lucky Stiffs, and the Perverse Pleasures of Obituaries. Daniel Okrent, who was the first Public Editor for the New York Times and the creator of Rotisserie League Baseball begins every day (for the past 40 years) turning to the New York Times obit page to see who has died and how they have lived. In recent years, he pays ever more attention to how old they were. It is impossible, Wroe says, to write obituaries for a living and not be drawn into musings on life and death. For her, each obituary is in fact "a progress report on a life that continues, somehow, elsewhere".

For the first 150 years of its life, The Economist magazine did not bother to record the lives of the dead. Since 1995 it has relented, and the Obituary page?odd, quirky, poetic, sometimes shocking, in the best British tradition of the craft?has become a favourite with readers. Princess Diana, Pope John Paul II, Hunter S. Thompson, Charlton Heston and?in a famous double-header?Brooke Astor and Leona Helmsley, have all been commemorated or eviscerated there. Rather than somber records of death, Economist obituaries are celebrations of all that is weird or wonderful, repulsive or inspiring, in human life.

Nothing is better for the soul than a good, bracing look at eternity. And here to peek into the abyss?with brisk advice for those who hope to leave in their wake a three column obituary, instead of a mere two?are the writers, Ann Wroe and Marilyn Johnson, whose business is to usher out the dead. Do we want the pretty stories in our obituaries, or the dirt? Daniel Okrent will weigh in on this discussion and ask: What?s wrong with reading obits as entertainment? And is it better to run a youthful photo or a wrinkled one?

This event is co-sponsored by

About Ann Wroe

Ann Wroe is the Obituaries and Briefing Editor of The Economist.

She Joined The Economist in 1976 to cover American Politics, and has held the posts of Books and Arts editor (1988-1992) and American editor (1992-2000). She is the author of five books, among them Pontius Pilate : The Biography of an Invented Man and Being Shelley: The Poet's Search for Himself. She is married with three sons and lives in London.

About Marilyn Johnson

Marilyn Johnson is the author of The Dead Beat: Lost Souls, Lucky Stiff, and the Perverse Pleasures of Obituaries, in which she turned a fascinated eye on journalists whose job description it is to bring the dead back (briefly) to life.

Other than outrageous oddities, like the man who drove hundreds of nails into his skull, or the transsexual whistler, the most compelling subjects in the thousands of obituaries she read were librarians. The subject of her next book are those curious, intelligent, mysterious people, whose job it is to save us from being buried alive by the information age, Librarians. Marilyn Johnson has been credited with making the creepy profession of obituary writing cool.

About Daniel Okrent

Daniel Okrent concluded his term as the first Public Editor of the New York Times in 2005. He has published four books--most recently Public Editor Number One. Okrent worked as the co-creative director of Our Times, an Illustrated encyclopedia of the twentieth century; he is the inventor and founder of Rotisserie LeagueBaseball; he was a featured commentator on Ken Burns's PBS series Baseball, and has appeared in Woody Allen's, Sweet and Lowdown.


About Paul Holdengräber

Paul Holdengräber is the Director of Public Programs?known as "LIVE from the NYPL"?for The Research Libraries of The New York Public Library.

FERRAN ADRIÀ in conversation with Corby Kummer & Harold McGee A Day at elBulli

Friday, October 10, 2008, 7 p.m.

No one can get into elBulli, Ferran Adrià's restaurant on the northeast coast of Spain. But plenty of people certainly try: every year, the restaurant receives over two million requests for only 8,000 seats during the six months it is open. For the other six months, Adrià, who is proud to be called the Salvador Dali of the Kitchen," travels, dreams, and creates at his "food laboratory" in Barcelona, called elBulli Taller, where his team includes a chemist and an industrial designer who also design plates and serving utensils to go with the food. No wonder, as Corby Kummer wrote in The Atlantic, making the twisty two-hour drive from Barcelona for a dinner that ends well into the wee hours has become a notch on every foodie's belt perhaps the notch, given the international derby to get reservations.

SPIKE LEE & JAMES McBRIDE in conversation with Paul Holdengräber Miracle at St. Anna

Friday, September 26, 2008, 7 p.m.

Spike Lee's new film, Miracle at St. Anna, chronicles the story of four black American soldiers who are members of the US Army as part of the all African-American 92nd "Buffalo Soldier" Division stationed in Tuscany, Italy during World War II. Based on the novel and with screenplay by James McBride, it is a story about redemption and triumph over the bleakest of experiences.

The book, Miracle at St. Anna, The Motion Picture, is not only a visual tribute to this epic, but also to the countless African American soldiers who risked their lives for a country in which they were treated with less respect than the enemy they were fighting. The book includes costume designs, storyboard sketches, personal text by Spike Lee, a full script book, and archival material from the Second World War.

Spike Lee and James McBride will be in conversation with Paul Holdengräber to discuss this historical American story that exposes racism, guilt, courage, revenge, and forgiveness.

About Spike Lee

Spike Lee is an Emmy Award winning, and Academy Award-nominated American film director, producer, writer, and actor noted for his films dealing with controversial social and political issues. He also teaches film at Columbia University. His production company, 40 Acres & A Mule Filmworks, has produced over thirty-five films since 1983, including Do the Right Thing, She's Gotta Have it, Malcolm X, and 25th Hour.

About James McBride

James McBride is an accomplished musician. He is the author of two novels: Miracle at St. Anna, now a major motion picture by director Spike Lee, and Song Yet Sung. McBride has written for The Washington Post, People, The Boston Globe, Essence, Rolling Stone, and The New York Times. McBride is a Distinguished Writer in Residence at New York University.

About Paul Holdengräber

Paul Holdengräber is the Director of Public Programs now known as "LIVE from the NYPL" for The Research Libraries of The New York Public Library.

PAUL AUSTER & CÉLINE CURIOL in conversation Man in the Dark & Voice Over

Wednesday, September 24, 2008, 7 p.m.

In Céline Curiol's Voice Over, a lonely young woman works as an announcer in Paris's Gare du Nord, surrounded by people yet separate from them. Alone she waits for a man who loves another. In her solitude, she wanders the streets of the modern city, playing on the edge of danger, seeking connection.

"I am alone in the dark, turning the world around in my head as I struggle through another bout of insomnia, another white night in the great American Wilderness." So begins Paul Auster's Man in the Dark. The man thinking these thoughts is a retired book critic who imagines a parallel world in which America is not at war with Iraq but with itself. In this other America, the twin towers did not fall, and the 2000 election results led to secession, as state after state pulled away from the union, and a bloody civil war ensued.

Two novelists come together to talk about living and writing in a world of ordinary joys, contradictions, and impulses while always being capable of the most grotesque violence.

About Paul Auster

Paul Auster is the author of numerous novels including The Brooklyn Follies, The Book of Illusions, and City of Glass. His nonfiction works include The Invention of Solitude and The Art of Hunger. He edited I Thought My Father Was God, the NPR National Story Project Anthology. Auster has also written screenplays including Smoke and Lulu on the Bridge. He recently wrote and directed The Inner Life of Martin Frost, which premiered at New York's New Directors/New Films Festival in 2007. He lives in Brooklyn.

About Céline Curiol

Céline Curiol is a journalist who has worked for various French media, including Libération, Radio France, and BBC Afrique. Her first novel Voix sans issue has been translated into fourteen languages, and will be released September 2008 in English in the US under the title Voice Over. Her second novel Permission and her travel book on Sierra Leone have recently been published in France. Originally from Lyon, Curiol lives in New York City, where she is at work on her third novel.

ANTÓNIO LOBO ANTUNES in conversation with Paul Holdengräber What Can I Do When Everything's On Fire?

Tuesday, September 23, 2008, 7 p.m.

In What Can I Do When Everything's On Fire?, the preeminent Portuguese novelist António Lobo Antunes, who trained as a psychiatrist and spent four year in the Portuguese army during the Angolan War, tells a story of sanity lost, of madness and consumption. This is a saga of growing old, of loving no matter what, and finally of a young man ineluctably coming to terms with the sins of his father and the life he has inherited now.

Based on a real life story and set in the steamy world of Lisbon's nightclub milieu of the 1990s "a baleful planet populated by drag queens, clowns, and drug addicts" the son of a legendary transvestite searches for his identity as he recalls the harrowing death of his father. The razor-thin line between reality and madness is fully transgressed in Lobo Antunes's first novel to appear in English in five years.

About António Lobo Antunes

António Lobo Antunes is the author of 18 novels, including Act of the Damned and The Natural Order of Things. His work has been translated into more than 20 languages. Lobo Antunes? first novel was Memory of an Elephant. His more recent novels are The Inquisitors? Manual, about life during the Salazar dictatorship, and The Return of the Caravels, about the breakup of Portugal's colonial dominion in the 1970s. Lobo Antunes has received numerous literary awards, such as the Jerusalem Prize for the Freedom of the Individual in Society and the Camões Prize, the most important literary prize for the Portuguese language. He lives in Lisbon.

About Paul Holdengräber

Paul Holdengräber is the Director of Public Programs, known as "LIVE from the NYPL", for The Research Libraries of The New York Public Library.

ROBERT BADINTER in conversation with NEAL KATYAL Abolition: One Man's Battle Against the Death Penalty

Friday, September 19, 2008, 7 p.m.

Robert Badinter, the French Minister of Justice between 1981 and 1986, led the battle to abolish the death penalty in France. He became a militant abolitionist after watching one of his clients unjustly guillotined in 1972. Over the next decade, he fought the death penalty in the courts and saved six men from the guillotine. After the election of François Mitterrand in 1981, Badinter was named Minister of Justice and pushed through the legislation that abolished the death penalty.

Badinter's book, Abolition: One Man's Battle Against the Death Penalty, serves as a guidebook on the various legal and political strategies that can be used in the quest for abolition. With U.S. Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer, Badinter recently co-authored a book on the role of judges.

In a discussion about the death penalty, Badinter will be joined by Neal Katyal who recently won Hamdan v. Rumsfeld in the United States Supreme Court and who in July of this year agreed to serve as lead counsel for the State of Louisiana in asking the United States Supreme Court to reconsider its June decision abolishing the use of the death penalty for child rapists. Kenneth Roth, executive director of Human Rights Watch, will introduce the evening. He has written the forward for Badinter's book, Abolition.

About Robert Badinter

Robert Badinter is the author of over a dozen books including work on Oscar Wilde and Condorcet. He also co-authored a recent book on the role of judges with U.S. Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer. Badinter is married to the prominent feminist Elisabeth Badinter. Together, they form one of France?s most influential couples. He is currently a member of the French Senate and celebrated his 80th birthday in March 2008.

About Neal Katyal

Georgetown University Law Professor, Neal Katyal, named one of the leading "40 lawyers under 40" by the National Law Journal, recently won Hamdan v. Rumsfeld in the United States Supreme Court, a case that challenged the policy of military trials at Guantanamo Bay Naval Station, Cuba. Katyal served as co-counsel for Vice President Al Gore in the U.S. Supreme Court election case Bush v. Palm Beach Canvassing Board, which challenged the Florida voting system. He has clerked for Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer as well as Judge Guido Calabresi of the U.S. Court of Appeals.

Katyal has appeared on every major American nightly news program including the Colbert Report.

DANIEL MENDELSOHN & JAMES WOOD in conversation with PICO IYER Reading in a World of Images

Wednesday, September 17, 2008, 7 p.m.

"Does the common reader exist in our world of splitting screens" Where might we find beauty, seriousness or moral passion among our fraying books? And does it even make sense to put Flaubert, Homer, and Oliver Stone into the same sentence? Two of the defining public critics of our time James Wood, a passionate reader who creates cathedrals out of words, and Daniel Mendelsohn, a professional classicist bringing rigor to the popular arts investigate the space where reading ends and real criticism begins.

---Pico Iyer

 Pico Iyer will conduct a discussion with Daniel Mendelsohn and James Wood, both authors of new books of criticism. Mendelsohn's How Beautiful It Is And How Easily It Can Be Broken is a collection of essays that comments on the vast landscape of contemporary American culture from Quentin Taratino?s film Kill Bill which he sees as representing a generation raised on television reruns and video replays to a theatrical face-off between the work of Stephen Sondheim ?but it's about something? and Mel Brooks ?a wholly safe evening.

In his book, How Fiction Works, Wood says that you have to "read enough literature to be taught by it how to read it" as he explores not just how fiction works but how a novelist's choices make us feel that a novel ultimately works or doesn't.

About Pico Iyer

Pico Iyer studied nothing but literature for eight years at Eton, Oxford and Harvard, and regularly writes literary essays for The New York Review of Books, Harper's, the T.L.S., The American Scholar among others. He is the author of two novels, Abandon and Cuba and the Night, as well as seven works of non-fiction, including Video Night in Kathmandu, The Lady and the Monk, The Global Soul, and, most recently, The Open Road, an account of 33 years of talks and travels with the XIVth Dalai Lama.

About Daniel Mendelsohn

Daniel Mendelsohn is a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books and many other publications. He is the author of The Lost, which won the National Book Critics Circle Award and the National Jewish Book Award. The author?s other awards include an NBCC award for book reviewing and the George Jean Nathan Prize for Drama Criticism. He teaches at Bard College. His new essay collection is How Beautiful It Is And How Easily It Can Be Broken.

About James Wood

James Wood is a staff writer at The New Yorker and a visiting lecturer in English and American literature at Harvard University. He is the author of two essay collections, The Broken Estate and The Irresponsible Self, and a novel, The Book Against God. His new book is How Fiction Works.

BERNARD-HENRI LÉVY & SLAVOJ ŽIŽEK: A Debate Instigated by Paul Holdengräber Violence & the Left in Dark Times

Tuesday, September 16, 2008, 7 p.m.

Bernard-Henri Lévy, France's "rock-star philosopher," and Slavoj Žižek, the Slovanian "Elvis of cultural theory," will scrutinize the totalitarianisms of the past as well as those of the future, as they argue for a new political and moral vision for our times and investigate the limits of tolerance.

Does the advent of capitalism cause more violence than it prevents? Is there violence in the simple idea of the neighbor? asks Žižek in Violence: Six Sideways Reflections.

Are human rights Western or Universal? How is it that progressives themselves-those who in the past defended individual rights and fought fascism-have now become the breeding ground for new kinds of dangerous attitudes? asks Lévy in Left in Dark Times: A Stand Against New Barbarism.

About Bernard-Henri Lévy

Bernard-Henri Lévy is a philosopher, journalist, activist, and filmmaker. He was hailed by Vanity Fair magazine as ?Superman and prophet: we have no equivalent in the United States.? Among his dozens of books are American Vertigo, Barbarism with a Human Face, and Who Killed Daniel Pearl? His writing has appeared in a wide range of publications throughout Europe and the United States. His films include the documentaries Bosna! and A Day in the Death of Sarajevo. Lévy is co-founder of the antiracist group SOS Racism and has served on diplomatic missions for the French government.

Slavoj ZizekAbout Slavoj Žižek

Slavoj Žižek's work triggers continuous controversy; Welcome to the Desert of the Real, his analysis of 9/11, was attacked both as anti-Semitic in Israel and as Zionist in Egypt. He is the author of more than thirty books and is the subject of the documentary Žižek!. His own critically acclaimed documentary, The Pervert's Guide to Cinema, was the subject of a film retrospective in 2007 at the Museum of Modern Art. Žižek is a senior researcher at the Institute of Sociology, University of Ljubljana, Slovenia, and has been a visiting professor at Columbia University, Princeton, and The New School.

About Paul Holdengräber

Paul Holdengräber is the Director of Public Programs now known as "LIVE from the NYPL" for The Research Libraries of The New York Public Library.

SALMAN RUSHDIE in conversation with JEFFREY EUGENIDES The Enchantress of Florence

Friday, June 27, 2008, 7 p.m.

Drawing on more than seven years of research, Salman Rushdie's new novel, The Enchantress of Florence, is the story of a woman who attempts to command her own destiny in a man's world. It brings together two cities that barely know each other the hedonistic Mughal capital, in which the brilliant emperor Akbar the Great wrestles daily with questions of belief, desire, and the treachery of his sons, and the equally sensual city of Florence, where Niccolò Machiavelli takes a starring role.

The story opens with a young European traveler who calls himself ‘Mogor dell’Amore,’ the Mughal of Love. He arrives at the court of the Emperor Akbar, lord of the great Mughal Empire, with a tale that captivates the imperial capital, a story about a mysterious woman, a great beauty believed to possess powers of enchantment and sorcery, and her impossible journey to the far off city of Florence.

With storytelling that mixes political intrigue and high drama, romance and magic, Jeffrey Eugenides and Salman Rushdie discuss the ways in which the novel is a reflection on war and politics, gender and society, fantasy and rumor, individuality and public life, and how the brutal past still influences our present world.

About Salman Rushdie

Salman Rushdie is the author of many novels including Shalimar the Clown, Grimus, Midnight's Children, Shame, The Satanic Verses, and The Ground Beneath Her Feet, and one collection of short stories, East, West. He has also published works of non-fiction including The Jaguar Smile and Imaginary Homelands.

About Jeffrey Eugenides

Jeffrey Eugenides is the author of the novels The Virgin Suicides and Middlesex, which received the Pulitzer Prize in 2003. His latest book, My Mistress's Sparrow Is Dead: Great Love Stories, from Chekhov to Munro, was published in January 2008. Jeffrey Eugenides is a Professor of Creative Writing at the Center for the Creative and Performing Arts at Princeton University.

A Tribute to NUALA O'FAOLAIN

Tuesday, June 24, 2008, 7 p.m.

Friends and fellow Irish writers of Nuala O’Faolain, who died in Dublin on May 9, will gather to pay tribute to one of Ireland?s best-loved writers.

Internationally known for her searing memoir, Are You Somebody?, as well as her acclaimed first novel, My Dream of You, O'Faolain was widely respected in Ireland as an award-winning television producer, journalist, and columnist for The Irish Times before her memoir caused a sensation on its publication in 1999. Her unblinking, unsentimental description of an impoverished Irish childhood that struck a chord with readers world-wide became a New York Times bestseller.

Frank McCourt, Paul Muldoon, Fintan O'Toole, Julie Grau, Sheridan Hay, John Low-Beer, and Deidre Brady will honor Nuala Nuala O'Faolaine's life with reminiscence, traditional music, and readings from her work.O'Faolain

Special live musical performance by Susan McKeown, vocals; Eamon O'Leary, guitar; Dana Lyn, fiddle; Cillian Vallely, uillean pipes, flutes; and Lindsey Horner, bass. During March 2005, McKeown appeared with O'Faolain at LIVE from the NYPL.

About Nuala O’Faolain

is the author of Are You Somebody?, My Dream of You, Almost There, and The Story of Chicago May. Her first memoir is often seen as a feminine, and feminist, counterpart to Frank McCourt's Angela's Ashes. 'A lot of us suffered in the Ireland of my day,' she later said. We came out of a culture where women were utterly powerless and children had no value. If you were hit at school you were hit at home for being hit at school. The only education a lot of us got was in neglect and being unloved.

And yet, O'Faolain's humanity softened her observations and her humor was irresistible. Despite being a well-known opinion columnist, a television and radio commentator, and bona fide celebrity, her work often chronicled her own sense of personal failure. She turned her vulnerability into a strength that enabled her to empathize with ordinary people?s fears and hopes. Her opinion column developed from a broadly feminist commentary to a narrative that spanned all aspects of the human condition. Her memoirs touched many readers, who responded by sending her hundreds of letters with their own tales of unhappiness and failed family life.

A resident of Brooklyn for much of the past seven years, O'Faolain ascribed her affinity for the City to her experience growing up one of nine children. ?When you live in the middle of mayhem for so long, you grow to need mayhem to construct peace within it.? As Maura Casey wrote in an Appreciation in the New York Times: 'Although her mortal life has ended, her words, her sympathy and insights, are here. Her writing helped her legions of readers believe in her and in the validity of their own experiences.'

About Deirdre Brady

Deirdre Brady is the next-youngest after Nuala of the nine O'Faolain children. She is the author of Thank You For the Days, a memoir that views the O'Faolain family from a very different perspective than her sister's. She left school when she was fifteen and at 20 years of age she married Eamon Brady, with whom she has seven children. She lives in Dublin.

About Julie Grau

Julie Grau is Senior Vice President and Publisher of Speigel & Grau, a division of Random House. Previously she was Vice President and Publisher of Riverhead Books, where she edited Nuala O'Faolain's novel, My Dream of You, her memoir, Almost There, and her work of biography, The Story of Chicago May.

About Sheridan Hay

Sheridan Hay is a novelist, editor, and teacher. She met Nuala O'Faolain in 1999 and remained a close friend until her death.

About John Low-Beer

John Low-Beer and Nuala O'Faolain met in 2002 and registered as domestic partners a year later. An attorney for the City of New York and a former professor of sociology, Low-Beer lives in Brooklyn with his daughter, Anna.

About Frank McCourt

Frank McCourt received the Pulitzer Prize and National Book Critics Circle Award for his memoir Angela's Ashes. He is also the author of 'Tis and Teacher Man, both international bestsellers. McCourt appeared with O'Faolain and others for "Silence, Exile and Cunning: What?s So Irish About That Anyway" on March 15, 2005, at LIVE from the NYPL.

About Paul Muldoon

Paul Muldoon teaches at Princeton University and is an Honorary Professor in the School of English at the University of St Andrews. He held the chair of Professor of Poetry at Oxford University five years and he is an Honorary Fellow of Hertford College, Oxford University. In 2003 he won the Pulitzer Prize in poetry and in 2007, he became poetry editor of The New Yorker.

About Fintan O'Toole

Fintan O'Toole is a literary critic, historical writer, and political commentator. He is known for his commentary on a remarkably wide-ranging number of subjects cultural, historical, political, social and economic. O'Toole has written for the Irish Times since 1988 and was drama critic for the New York Daily News from 1997 to 2001. He is the author of more than ten books.

EMINENT DOMAIN: THE AMERICAN DREAM ON SALE Marshall Berman, Mindy Fullilove, Tom Angotti, Brian Berger & Michael Galinksy, moderator

Wednesday, June 18, 2008, 7 p.m.

"Few of us emerged from the twentieth century with a strong, sustaining neighborhood to call home. We are sprawled away from one another, or packed into poverty. These two ends must be brought closer toward a middle of vital, dense, playful neighborhoods that nourish our souls and our communities."

---Mindy Fullilove

What is the American Dream? Does it mean having a 'better life' by creating a home and a community, living together for generations, building and tending relationships to one another and to a place? Or do we create a "better life" by moving up, moving out, removing the old, replacing with the new

Between 1949 and 1973 urban renewal, a program of the U.S. government, bulldozed 2,500 neighborhoods in 993 American cities and dispossessed one million people. Roots got cut, neighbors and families became separated, languages and cultures were destroyed, and social bonds were broken.

The current exhibition at The New York Public Library, Eminent Domain: Contemporary Photography and the City through August 29, features the work of five contemporary New York?based photographers 'Thomas Holton, Bettina Johae, Reiner Leist, Zoe Leonard, and Ethan Levitas' whose works intersect and resonate with current concerns about the reorganization of urban space, and its public use, in New York City. Artist Glenn Ligon offers the literal narrative of his own housing in the city. In addition to proposed regulations that threaten First Amendment rights to photograph in public places thus becoming a form of privatization of public space, questions also arise with the current private/public arrangements that characterize much of modern urban development, particularly the legal power of eminent domain, or the taking of private property for public use.

Marshall Berman, Professor of Political Science, City College and the Graduate Center; Mindy Fullilove, Professor of Clinical Psychiatry and Public Health at Columbia University; Tom Angotti, Professor of Urban Affairs & Planning at Hunter College; and Brian Berger, photographer/blogger, will discuss the use of eminent domain and how urban renewal is changing the cityscape of New York City. Filmmaker Michael Galinsky will moderate.

The Atlantic Yards, a hotly contested developer driven project in Brooklyn, will serve as a focus through which the evening will begin. A short trailer from the film Battle of Brooklyn, directed by Michael Galinsky and Suki Hawley, will portray the arguments of some of the main players in this current eminent domain debate.

After a summary of how the use of eminent domain is shaping our City, an open discussion with the audience will address what all of this means for the future of NYC.

About Tom Angotti

Tom Angotti is Professor of Urban Affairs and Planning at Hunter College, CUNY, and Director of the Hunter College Center for Community Planning and Development. He is the Land Use columnist for www.gothamgazette.com and edits Progressive Planning Magazine. He is the author of Metropolis 2000 and Housing in Italy and founding member of the Task Force on Community-Based Planning in New York City. His book, New York For Sale: Community Planning Confronts Global Real Estate, will be published in October 2008.

About Brian Berger

Historian, journalist and photographer Brian Berger is the co-editor of New York Calling: From Blackout to Bloomberg. He writes about literature, film, and music for Stop Smiling magazine and also publishes the all-city blog, WhoWalkInBrooklyn.com. He divides his time between South Brooklyn and Rockaway Beach, Queens.

About Marshall Berman

Marshall Berman is Distinguished Professor of Political Science at City College of New York and CCNY Graduate Center, where he teaches political theory and urban studies. His books include On The Town: One Hundred Years of Spectacle in Times Square and All That Is Solid Melts into Air: The Experience of Modernity. He is co-editor of New York Calling: From Blackout to Bloomberg.

About Mindy Fullilove

Mindy Fullilove is a research psychiatrist at New York State Psychiatric Institute and a professor of clinical psychiatry and public health at Columbia University. She has studied the long-term consequences of urban renewal for African American people and co-founded NYC RECOVERS for the social and emotional recovery of NYC after 9/11. She is the author of Root Shock: How Tearing Up City Neighborhoods Hurts America and What We Can Do About It.

About Michael Galinsky

Michael Galinsky is a filmmaker based in Brooklyn. Currently he and his partners Suki Hawley and David Beilinson are working on several Brooklyn-based projects that track issues related to development. For four and a half years they have been following the saga of the Atlantic Yards development. Most recently they worked on a film about Arthur Wood's efforts to save his landmark artistic statement, The Broken Angel, from destruction. Previous films are Horn and Halos and Code 33.

PHILIP GOUREVITCH & ERROL MORRIS Carne Ross, moderator: Standard Operating Procedure

Tuesday, May 13, 2008, 7 p.m.

All I did was what I was told to do. I didn't make the war. I can't end the war. I mean, photographs can't just make or change a war. It just doesn't make sense. I mean, how do people see me as the villain? The government is just putting the blame on me because they can?just like a decoy. I can't get mad. I mean, I'm over it. I'm fine. I mean, I'm not fine with it but whatever. ---Private First Class Lynndie England, Abu Ghraib, 2003.

From Standard Operating Procedure  

When the infamous photographs from Abu Ghraib prison were first made public four years ago, they seemed to constitute an awesome expose of the profound corruption of America's response to September 11th. The sanction of torture, and the decriminalization of cruel, inhuman and degrading treatment of prisoners in wartime, have become defining legacies of the current Administration?and have given us the defining images of America's changing standing in the eyes of the world. But it didn't take long for the soldiers who took and appeared in the Abu Ghraib photographs to be singled out as depraved rogues, when in fact they were implementing America's de facto policy in Iraq. Just as criminality had become the norm, the expose now became the cover-up.

Now, two of our keenest moral and political observers, author Philip Gourevitch and filmmaker Errol Morris, have taken on the story of the soldiers who took and appeared in the photographs?and they have produced a war story that explores the horror at the core of the ongoing campaign to fight terror with terror. In their new book, Standard Operating Procedure, Gourevitch and Morris expand on the investigation Morris conducted for his just-released film of the same title, to tell the story of Abu Ghraib from the inside out and the bottom up.

Philip Gourevitch and Errol Morris will be joined by Carne Ross to discuss the first full reckoning of what actually happened at Abu Grraib prison based on hundreds of hours of interviews with the Americans involved.

About Philip Gourevitch

Philip Gourevitch is the author of We Wish to Inform You That Tomorrow We Will Be Killed with Our Families: Stories from Rwanda and A Cold Case. He is the editor of The Paris Review and a longtime staff writer for The New Yorker.

About Errol Morris

Errol Morris is a filmmaker, the Academy Award-winning director of The Fog of War, and the recipient of a MacArthur genius award. His other films include Mr. Death, Fast Cheap & Out of Control, A Brief History of Time, and The Thin Blue Line.

About Carne Ross

Carne Ross was the UK's Iraq specialist at the United Nations Security Council from 1997-2002, where he worked on weapons of mass destruction and sanctions. After giving secret evidence to an official inquiry into the Iraq war, he resigned from the British diplomatic service and founded Independent Diplomat, the world's first non-profit diplomatic advisory group. He is author of Independent Diplomat: Dispatches from an Unaccountable Elite.

PEN WORLD VOICES Conversations in the Library BERNHARD SCHLINK & ANDRÉ ACIMAN

Sunday, May 4, 2008, 4 p.m.

Best known for his acclaimed 1999 novel, The Reader, Bernhard Schlink's latest work, Homecoming, continues to examine ideas of complicity and self-deception in postwar Germany. André Aciman is a noted essayist and editor of The Proust Project. His 1994 memoir, Out of Egypt, movingly evoked several generations of his Jewish family's roots in Alexandria, and his recent novel, Call Me By Your Name, is an erotic coming-of-age saga soaked in Mediterranean sun and adolescent yearning.

Join us for a conversation with these two extraordinary authors as they probe their own creative powers to weld secret memory and history into some of the most exquisite and evocative literature today.

 

About André Aciman

André Aciman was born in Alexandria, Egypt, has lived in Italy and France, and was educated at Harvard. He is the author of Out of Egypt: A Memoir, False Papers: Essays on Exile and Memory, and the co-author and editor of The Proust Project and Letters of Transit. His most recent book is Call Me By Your Name. Aciman is the recipient of a Whiting Writers? Award, a Guggenheim Fellowship as well as a fellowship from The New York Public Library's Center for Scholars and Writers. He has written for The New York Times, The New Yorker, The New Republic, The New York Review of Books, and Commentary.

About Bernhard Schlink

Bernhard Schlink was born in Germany. He is the author of the novel The Reader, as well as four prize-winning crime novels?The Gordian Knot, Self's Fraud, Self's Punishment, and Self Slaughter. His most recent novel is Homecoming. Schlink was a Fellow at the Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers at The New York Public Library. He lives in Bonn and Berlin.

PEN WORLD VOICES Conversations in the Library BOOKS THAT CHANGED MY LIFE Annie Proulx, Olivier Rolin, Yousef Al-Mohaimeed, Antonio Muñoz Molina, Catherine Millet & Paul Holdengraber, moderator

Sunday, May 4, 2008, 4 p.m.

What is it about the reading experience that leaves such a powerful and lasting impression -particularly in the minds of future writers themselves?

Authors from the U.S., Europe, and the Middle East Annie Proulx, Olivier Rolin, Yousef Al-Mohaimeed, Antonio Muñoz Molina, and Catherine Millet discuss the books that have touched and altered their lives, the books they continue to carry with them around the world, and the feelings of true discovery and passion these works inspired. Paul Holdengräber, director of The New York Public Library's Public Programs, leads the discussion.

 

About Yousef Al-Mohaimeed

Huda Saleh Yousef Al-Mohaimeed was born in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia and has published several novels and short story collections in Arabic. In 2008 his debut novel, Wolves of the Crescent Moon, became his first book to be published outside of the Middle East. Al-Mohaimeed was presented with an award by Diwan al Arab magazine and the Egyptian Journalists Union in recognition of his creative contribution to Arab culture in 2004. 

About Catherine Millet

Catherine Millet is the author of the memoir The Sexual Life of Catherine M. She is also an art critic, curator, and the founder and editor of modern art magazine Art Press. She published Dali et Moi in 2005. The English translation is to be published by Scheidegger & Spiess. 

About Antonio Muñoz Molina 

Antonio Muñoz Molina was born in Spain. He is the author of 13 novels, among them Sepharad, the English translation of which won the 2004 PEN/Book-of-the-Month Club Translation Prize. His other novels include Beatus Ille, El Jinete Polaco, Prince of Shadows, and Winter in Lisbon. His most recent book is an evocation of New York City entitled Ventanas de Manhattan. He has twice been awarded Spain's Premio Nacional de Literatura.

About Annie Proulx

Annie Proulx did not start writing until her late 50s. Since then she has received many literary awards, including the PEN-Faulkner Award, the Dos Passos Prize, the Pulitzer Prize, the National Book Award and the Irish Times International Prize for her novels and short stories. A new collection of short stories, Fine Just the Way It Is, will be published in 2008.

About Olivier Rolin

Olivier Rolin was born in Boulogne-Billancourt, France, and spent his childhood in Senegal. Rolin has published works in fiction and non-fiction and wrote for the French daily Liberation and the weekly Nouvel Observateur. He is an editor for the French publisher Le Seuil and for the magazine Le Meilleur des mondes. His work is filled with references to May 1968 and the proletarian left while his many travels around the world make up the core of his non-fiction work. Rolin won the literay prize Prix Femina for his book Port-Soudan and Tigre en papier was nominated for the 2003 Goncourt prize.

About Paul Holdengräber

Paul Holdengräber is the Director of Public Programs now known as "LIVE from the NYPL" for The Research Libraries of The New York Public Library.

PEN WORLD VOICES Conversations in the Library TRUTH & RECONCILIATION: A National Reckoning

Sunday, May 4, 2008, 2 p.m.

RIAN MALAN, LIEVE JORIS, ALEXANDRA FULLER, FRANCISCO GOLDMAN & Paul van Zyl, moderator

In countries riven by war and genocidal violence 'from South Africa and Zimbabwe, to the Congo, Rwanda and Guatemala' what, exactly, are the possibilities for truth and reconciliation? And what are the pitfalls' Join authors Rian Malan (My Traitor's Heart), Lieve Joris (The Rebels? Hour), Alexandra Fuller (Scribbling the Cat: Travels with an African Soldier), and Francisco Goldman (The Art of Political Murder: Who Killed the Bishop?) for a far-ranging discussion. Moderated by Paul van Zyl, who served as Executive Secretary of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission in South Africa, from 1995 to 1998, and is now Vice President and Program Director of the International Center for Transitional Justice.

About Alexandra Fuller

Alexandra Fuller was born in England. In 1972 she moved with her family to a farm in Rhodesia. After that country's civil war in 1981, the Fullers moved first to Malawi, then to Zambia. Fuller received a B.A. from Acadia University in Nova Scotia, Canada. She is the author of Don't Let's Go to the Dogs Tonight: An African Childhood, a New York Times Notable Book of 2002, and a finalist for the Guardian First Book Award, and Scribbling the Cat, winner of the 2005 Ulysses Award for Art of Reportage.

About Francisco Goldman

Francisco Goldman was born in Boston. He is the author of The Long Night of White Chickens, which won the Sue Kaufman Award for First Fiction and was a finalist for the PEN/Faulkner award, and The Ordinary Seaman, which was a finalist for the International IMPAC Dublin Fiction Prize, the PEN/Faulkner award, and The Los Angeles Times Book Prize. His work has appeared in The New Yorker, The New York Review of Books, and The New York Times Magazine. His most recent novel is The Divine Husband and his first work of nonfiction, The Art of Political Murder: Who Killed the Bishop?, was published in 2007.

About Lieve Joris

Lieve Joris has published widely acclaimed books on the Middle East, Africa, and Europe. Her translated work includes Back to the Congo, The Gates of Damascus, and Mali Blues. Her latest book, The Rebels Hour, will be published in the U.S. in April 2008. Lieve Joris was born in Belgium and now lives in Amsterdam.

About Rian Malan

Rian Malan is the author of My Traitor's Heart. He has served as a contributing editor on Rolling Stone and Esquire magazines and written articles for Time magazine, The Spectator, and The Observer, among many others.

About Paul van Zyl

Paul van Zyl is a co-founder and the Executive Vice-President of the International Center for Transitional Justice, an organization which assists countries pursuing accountability for past mass atrocity or human rights abuse. He has acted as an adviser and consultant to human rights organizations, governments, international organizations, and foundations on transitional justice issues in numerous countries. From 1995 to 1998, he served as Executive Secretary of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission in South Africa. Mr. van Zyl is director of New York University School of Law's Transitional Justice Program, and teaches law both in New York and Singapore.

PEN WORLD VOICES Conversations in the Library JEFFREY EUGENIDES & DANIEL KEHLMANN

Sunday, May 4, 2008, 2 p.m.

Referring to Jeffrey Eugenides's novel Middlesex, The New York Times Book Review said, The book's length feels like its author's arms stretching farther and farther to encompass more people, more life . . . but mostly it is a colossal act of curiosity, of imagination, and of love.? Daniel Kehlmann's Measuring the World was hailed as 'ravishing' by the German paper Der Spiegel. Both authors books were runaway international best sellers and today they come together, admirers of each others work, to talk about making fiction from fact and much more.

  

Jeffrey Eugenides was born in Detroit, Michigan. His first novel, The Virgin Suicides, has been translated into fifteen languages and made into a feature film. His second novel, Middlesex, received the Pulitzer Prize in 2003 and was shortlisted for the National Book Critics Circle Award, France's Prix Medici, and the International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award. His latest book, My Mistress's Sparrow Is Dead: Great Love Stories, from Chekhov to Munro, was published in January 2008. Jeffrey Eugenides is a Professor of Creative Writing at the Center for the Creative and Performing Arts at Princeton University.
 

About Daniel Kehlmann

Daniel Kehlmann attended a Jesuit college in Vienna, traveled widely, and has won several awards for previous novels and short stories, including the 2005 Candide Award. His works have been translated into more than twenty languages, and Measuring the World became an instant best seller in several European countries. Kehlmann spent the fall of 2006 as writer-in-residence at New York University's Deutsches Haus. He lives in Vienna.

About Jeffrey Eugenides

Jeffrey Eugenides was born in Detroit, Michigan. His first novel, The Virgin Suicides, has been translated into fifteen languages and made into a feature film. His second novel, Middlesex, received the Pulitzer Prize in 2003 and was shortlisted for the National Book Critics Circle Award, France’s Prix Medici, and the International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award. His latest book, My Mistress's Sparrow Is Dead: Great Love Stories, from Chekhov to Munro, was published in January 2008. Jeffrey Eugenides is a Professor of Creative Writing at the Center for the Creative and Performing Arts at Princeton University.
 

PEN WORLD VOICES Conversations in the Library PÉTER ESTERHÁZY& WAYNE KOESTENBAUM

Sunday, May 4, 2008, 12 noon

Born in Budapest, in 1950, Péter Esterházy is one of the best-known contemporary Hungarian writers, and his work stands with some of the greats of postwar literature. His novel, Revised Edition, was born from the shock he received when he discovered that his father was an informer for the Hungarian secret police during the Communist era. He'll talk about family secrets with Wayne Koestenbaum whose poetry titles include Best Selling Jewish Porn Films and The Milk of Inquiry, the novel, Moira Orfei in Aigues-Mortes, and six nonfiction books including Hotel Theory and Andy Warhol.

Morgan Meis, founding member and President of Flux Factory Inc., will introduce the conversation.

 

About Péter Esterházy 

Péter Esterházy  was born in Budapest. He is the author of A Little Hungarian Pornography, She Loves Me, and Celestial Harmonies. He has received many honors, notably the Ordre des Arts et des Lettres Prize at the Literary Festival in Rome and the Peace Prize at the German Book Trade at the Frankfurt Book Fair.

About Wayne Koestenbaum

Wayne Koestenbaum's publications include the nonfiction books Andy Warhol, The Queen's Throat, and Cleavage: Essays on Sex, Stars and Aesthetics; the novel Moira Orfei in Aigues-Mortes, and the poetry collections Model Homes, The Milk of Inquiry, Rhapsodies of a Repeat Offender, and Ode to Anna Moffo and Other Poems. His most recent book is Hotel Theory. He is a Distinguished Professor of English at the CUNY Graduate Center and a Visiting Professor in the Painting Department of the Yale School of Art.

PEN WORLD VOICES Conversations in the Library COLUM MCCANN & MICHAEL ONDAATJE Adventures in the Skin Trade

Sunday, May 4, 2008, 12 noon

Colum McCann meets with Michael Ondaatje at a very public fireplace.

Come hear these two best-selling authors both of whom are often spoken of as "international mongrels" in the sense that their backgrounds and their range of literary influences are cast extraordinarily wide. "We get our voice from the voices of others," says McCann, "and Ondaatje has long been a hero of mine." This is a fireside chat that promises to be offbeat, informal, unrehearsed and thrillingly passionate.

 

About Colum McCann

Colum McCann is the author of four novels and two collections of stories. He has received numerous international awards for his fiction, as well as a 2005 Oscar nomination for his short film "Everything in This Country Must." His novels have been published in 28 languages. His latest, Zoli, was published in 2007. McCann was a Fellow at The New York Public Library's Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers during 2004-2005.

About Michael Ondaatje

Michael Ondaatje was born in Sri Lanka. He is the author of many works of fiction, poetry, and memoir, including The English Patient, which won the Booker Prize in 1992; Running in the Family; and Coming Through Slaughter. He won the Governor General's Award for two of his poetry books, The Collected Works of Billy the Kid and There's a Trick with a Knife I'm Learning To Do. His most recent work is Divisadero, a novel. He currently resides in Toronto.

ARCHIVE FEVER: Okwui Enwezor, Christian Boltanski, Luc Sante, Lorna Simpson, George Lewis & Paul Holdengräber

Monday, April 14, 2008, 7 p.m.

One of the most compelling issues explored by artists in recent years centers on the nature and meaning of the archive, that is, how we create, store, and circulate pictures and information.

Against the standard view of the archive which evokes a dim, musty place full of drawers and filing cabinets with historical artifacts or the dusty shelves of the library, an active archival impulse has emerged which engages the attention of contemporary artists and thinkers as a way of shaping and constructing the meaning of images.

Okwui Enwezor, curator of the exhibition Archive Fever Uses of the Document in Contemporary Art at the International Center of Photography, will sit down with Paul Holdengräber to talk about the archival impulse at work in museums, libraries, and in various artistic practices. This inquiry will be followed by two conversations between first Christian Boltanski and Luc Sante, and then Lorna Simpson and George Lewis.

7:00 - 7:20 pm

Okwui Enwezor & Paul Holdengräber

7:20 - 8:00 pm

Christian Boltanski & Luc Sante

8:00 - 8:40 pm

Lorna Simpson & George Lewis

8:40 pm Q&A

This event is co-sponsored by the International Center of Photography.

 

About Okwui Enwezor

Okwui Enwezor is adjunct curator at the International Center of Photography and is curator of the current show at ICP, Archive Fever. Enwezor is Dean of Academic Affairs at the San Francisco Art Institute, and has been Visiting Professor in Art History at the University of Pittsburgh. He has held teaching positions at Columbia University, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and the University of Umea, Sweden. Enwezor was Artistic Director of Documenta 11, Kassel, Germany (1998-2002) and the 2nd Johannesburg Biennale (1996-1997). He is a recipient of the College Art Association?s Frank Jewett Mather Award for Criticism and the Peter Norton Curatorial Award.

About Christian Boltanski

Christian Boltanski is one of France's best-known artists of the postwar generation. Boltanski has developed a highly personal and often disconcerting oeuvre that challenges basic assumptions of what constitutes an artwork. Using media as diverse as newspaper clippings, used clothes, amateur snapshots, and flickering shadows, Boltanski forges an original universe in which he is frequently the central protagonist. Internationally exhibited, Boltanski has been the recipient of the Laureate of the Praemium Imperiale, 2006, for sculpture; the Kaiser ring, Monchhausmuseum Goslar, 2001; and the Kunstpreis, 2001, given by Nord/LB, Braunschweig, Germany.

About George Lewis

George Lewis serves as the Edwin H. Case Professor of American Music, and as the Director of the Center for Jazz Studies at Columbia University. The recipient of a MacArthur Fellowship in 2002, an Alpert Award in the Arts in 1999, and fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, Lewis studied composition with Muhal Richard Abrams at the AACM School of Music, and trombone with Dean Hey. Lewis's work as composer, improviser, performer and interpreter explores electronic and computer music, computer-based multimedia installations, text-sound works, and notated and improvised forms, and is documented on more than 120 recordings. He is author of Power Stronger Than Itself: The AACM and American Experimental Music.

About Luc Sante

Luc Sante is a writer and critic. His books include Low Life, Evidence, The Factory of Facts, Walker Evans, and Kill All Your Darlings: Pieces 1990-2005. He co-edited, with his wife, the writer Melissa Holbrook Pierson, O. K. You Mugs: Writers on Movie Actors, and translated and edited Felix Feneon's Novels in Three Lines. Luc Sante is a frequent contributor to the New York Review of Books. Sante received a Whiting Writer's Award in 1989, a Guggenheim Fellowship in 1992-93, a Literature Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters in 1997, and a Grammy, for album notes for the Anthology of American Folk Music, in 1998. He teaches writing and the history of photography at Bard College.

About Lorna Simpson

Lorna Simpson is a photo-based artist and filmmaker. Emerging in the 1980s, Simpson juxtaposes photographic images of black women, seldom seen in full view, with fragmented texts. While commenting on the ways in which black women are seen, and they ways in which they see themselves, Simpson raises philosophical questions about the relationship between image and text, and about the construction of self. Widely exhibited, a touring retrospective of Simpson's work, organized by the American Federation of Arts, was seen at the Museum of Contemporary Art ? Los Angeles, the Miami Art Museum, and the Whitney Museum of Art in 2006-2007. Simpson's work has also been seen at the Studio Museum of Harlem and in Documenta XI.
 

About Paul Holdengraber

Paul Holdengräber is the Director of Public Programs now known as "LIVE from the NYPL" for The Research Libraries of The New York Public Library.

PICO IYER in conversation with Paul Holdengräber The Open Road: The Global Journey of the Fourteenth Dalai Lama

Friday, April 11, 2008, 7 p.m.

In his new book, The Open Road: The Global Journey of the Fourteenth Dalai Lama, Pico Iyer gives us the first serious consideration of this worldwide leader's work and ideas as a politician, scientist, and philosopher. Having been engaged in conversation with the Dalai Lama for the last three decades, Iyer captures the paradoxes of the Dalai Lama's position: though he has brought the ideas of Tibet to world attention, Tibet itself is being remade as a Chinese province; though he was born in one of the remotest, least developed places on earth, he has become a champion of globalism and technology. Iyer illuminates the hidden life, the transforming ideas, and the daily challenges of this global icon.

Pico Iyer is the author of Video Night in Kathmandu, The Lady and the Monk, The Global Soul, and Abandon.

About Pico Iyer

Pico Iyer is the author of two novels and seven works of non-fiction, including Video Night in Kathmandu, The Lady and the Monk, The Global Soul, and most recently The Open Road: The Global Journey of the Fourteenth Dalai Lama, a record of 34 years of traveling and talking with the XIVth Dalai Lama. His novel Abandon was translated into Russian, Turkish, and Bahasa Indonesian, among others. His articles on globalism, literature, and religion also appear often in such publications as The New York Review of Books, Harper's, the New York Times, and Time magazine. Born to Indian parents in Oxford, England, he grew up in California, was educated at Eton, Oxford, and Harvard, and has been based for 20 years in Japan, while spending much of his time in Easter Island, North Korea, Ethiopia, and places in-between. In 1995 Iyer was named by the Utne Reader, along with the likes of Noam Chomsky and Vaclav Havel, as one of 100 visionaries worldwide who could change your life.

About Paul Holdengraber

Paul Holdengräber is the Director of Public Programs now known as "LIVE from the NYPL" for The Research Libraries of The New York Public Library.

AGAINST THE MACHINE: Being Human in the Age of the Electronic Mob LEE SIEGEL, NICHOLSON BAKER, HEIDI JULAVITS & Paul Holdengräber

Thursday, April 10, 2008, 7 p.m.

Is the Internet "the first social environment created for the asocial individual?"

That's what Lee Siegel argues in his new book, Against the Machine: Being Human in the Age of the Electronic Mob. Siegel believes that the web and its cultural correlatives and by-products such as the dominance of reality television and the rise of the bourgeois bohemian have turned privacy into performance, play into commerce, and confused self-expression with art.

Even as technology gurus ply their trade using the language of freedom and democracy, we cede more and more control of our freedom and individuality to the needs of the machine that confluence of business and technology whose boundaries now stretch to encompass almost all human activity.

Join Lee Siegel, Nicholson Baker, Heidi Julavits, and Paul Holdengräber, moderator, in a blistering and wide-ranging discussion of Siegel's critique of the Internet and the social and cultural conditions from which it sprang.

About Lee Siegel

Lee Siegel is the author of the essay collections Falling Upwards and Not Remotely Controlled. Siegel has been the television critic for the New Republic, book critic for The Nation, art critic for Slate, staff writer at Harper's and Talk, contributing writer for the LA Times Book Review, associate editor of ARTnews, and associate editor of Raritan. In 2002, Siegel received the National Magazine Award for Reviews and Criticism. His new book is Against the Machine: Being Human in the Age of the Electronic Mob.

About Nicholson Baker

Nicholson Baker attended the Eastman School of Music and Haverford College. He has published six previous novels and three works of nonfiction, including The Size of Thoughts and Double Fold. His new book is Human Smoke: The Beginnings of World War II, the End of Civilization.

About Heidi Julavits

Heidi Julavits is the author of three novels, most recently the Uses of Enchantment. Her fiction and non-fiction have appeared in Harper's, Time, and The New York Times among others. She is a founding editor of The Believer, a monthly magazine published by McSweeney's, and the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship.

About Paul Holdengraber

Paul Holdengräber is the Director of Public Programs now known as "LIVE from the NYPL" for The Research Libraries of The New York Public Library.

AN INNOCENT MAN IN GUANTANAMO: Five Years of My Life Murat Kurnaz An evening with Baher Azmy, Bernhard Docke, Philippe Sands, Michael Ratner & James Yee with a reading by Wallace Shawn

Friday, April 4, 2008, 7 p.m.

In October 2001, nineteen year old Murat Kurnaz, a Turkish citizen and legal resident of Germany, traveled to Pakistan to learn more about his Muslim faith. A few weeks later, on the day he was to return to Germany, Kurnaz was arrested at a police checkpoint without explanation. Kurnaz was then handed over to the U.S. military and transported to a U.S. military base in Afghanistan. After two months, Kurnaz was taken to Guantanamo and held prisoner for five years.

Murat Kurnaz? memoir, FIVE YEARS OF MY LIFE: An Innocent Man in Guantanamo, with an introduction by Patti Smith, is a powerful reminder that every day human lives are at stake. During his imprisonment, Kurnaz suffered solitary confinement, sleep deprivation, physical abuse, and sexual humiliation. Despite his best efforts to communicate his innocence, Kurnaz was charged as an ?enemy combatant? by a Combatant Status Review Tribunal in Guantanamo in September 2004.

This evening will bring together the lawyers in Germany and the U.S. who fought for Murat?s release, an ex-Guantanamo chaplain who was accused of espionage and imprisoned, and Guantanamo experts. Together they will help us understand the political and legal context, give us the perspective from the ?other side of the wire,? and deliver a picture of life in Guantanamo today.

Wallace Shawn will read from Murat Kurnaz's memoir and take part in the discussion.

About Baher Azmy

Baher Azmy is a Professor at Seton Hall Law School, where he directs a civil rights clinic and teaches constitutional law. His litigation work on national security and human rights cases emerging from the "war on terror" include lawfulness of extraordinary rendition, torture, and indefinite executive detention. In July 2004, he began representation of Murat Kurnaz imprisoned in Guantanamo Bay until his release in August 2006.

About Bernhard Docke

Bernhard Docke, a lawyer since 1983, specializes in criminal law, since 1989 partner of the law firm "Dr. Heinrich Hannover und Partner" in Bremen, Germany. He has been a lawyer for Mr. Kurnaz since 2002.

About Murat Kurnaz

Murat Kurnaz is a Turkish citizen and legal resident of Germany, where he was born in 1982. He was in the process of becoming a German citizen when he was arrested in Pakistan and held prisoner for five years. He now lives in Germany. His memoir is FIVE YEARS OF MY LIFE: An Innocent Man in Guantanamo.

About Michael Ratner

Michael Ratner is the president of the Center for Constitutional Rights. He is also an attorney who represented a number of Guantanamo detainees and a professor at Columbia Law School and Yale Law School.

About Philippe Sands

Philippe Sands is an international lawyer and a professor of law at University College London. He is the author of Lawless World and is frequently a commentator on news and current affairs programs including CNN, MSNBC, and BBC World Service. He has been involved in many leading international cases, including the World Court trial of Slobodan Milosevic and the treatment of British detainees at Guantanamo Bay. His article, "The Green Light," about how high level members of the Bush administration pressured underlings to use torture tactics at Guantanamo, appears in the May 2008 issue of Vanity Fair. He is the author of Torture Team: Rumsfeld?s Memo and the Betrayal of American Values. He lives in London, England.

About Wallace Shawn

Wallace Shawn is an Obie-winning playwright and a stage and screen actor. His plays include The Designated Mourner, Marie and Bruce, The Fever, and Aunt Dan and Lemon. He co-wrote and starred in the art-house classic My Dinner with Andre and he also performed in numerous Woody Allen films including Manhattan and Radio Days. Our Late Night and a Thought in Three Parts: Two Plays will be published in Spring 2008.

About James Yee

James Yee is the former US Army Muslim Chaplain of Guantanamo Bay. His book, For God And Country, Faith and Patriotism Under Fire, tells the story about being wrongly accused of espionage and imprisoned by the U.S. military. In 2004, the government dropped all charges against him and he received an honorable discharge from the U.S. Army.

NICHOLSON BAKER in conversation with SIMON WINCHESTER Human Smoke: The Beginnings of World War II, the End of Civilization

Thursday, March 20, 2008, 7 p.m.

In Human Smoke, Nicholson Baker, author of The Size of Thoughts and Double Fold, weaves together a chronicle of the beginnings of World War II, and presents an indictment of the treasured myths that have romanticized much of the 1930s and 40s. Through a running narrative of press clippings, Baker details mankind's unstoppable descent into the madness of war from 1914 until 1941 and pierces the lies, hopes, fears, and legends we so easily imbibe on the road to war. Human Smoke: The Beginnings of World War II, the End of Civilization offers a new perspective on the political, social, religious, and economic events in the years preceding World War II.

About Nicholson Baker

Nicholson Baker was born in 1957 and attended the Eastman School of Music and Haverford College. He has published six previous novels and three works of nonfiction, including Double Fold, which won a National Book Critics Circle Award in 2001.

About Simon Winchester

Simon Winchester is a journalist, writer and a trained geologist. His books include The Professor and the Madman, The Meaning of Everything, and Krakatoa: The Day the World Exploded, August 27, 1883. His most recent book is A Crack in the Edge of the World: America and the Great California Earthquake of 1906.

A JAMES BALDWIN Tribute COLM TÓIBÍN with JOHN EDGAR WIDEMAN, MANTHIA DIAWARA, FARAH JASMINE GRIFFIN, MICHAEL THELWELL & WALTON MUYUMBA, moderator

Tuesday, March 18, 2008, 7 p.m.

"Here on 42nd Street it was less elegant but no less strange," a young novelist wrote in the early fifties. "He loved this street, not for the people or the shops but for the stone lions that guarded the great main building of the Public Library, a building filled with books and unimaginably vast, and which he had never yet dared to enter." The passage is from Go Tell It on the Mountain. James Baldwin was one of many who got over their fear, their awe of the lions and the marble and the grandeur. He, too, walked in, and he left behind his books, a shelf of gifts in a palace of many millions.

David Remnick, The New Yorker,

May 22, 1995

James Baldwin was one of the great American prose stylists as well as an acute commentator on matters of race and gender. His collection of essays, The Price of the Ticket, a compendium of nearly fifty years of Baldwin's powerful nonfiction writing including Notes of a Native Son, Nobody Knows My Name, and The Fire Next Time, makes clear his wisdom and eloquence. In these personal and prophetic works, he speaks to the heart of the experience of race and identity as well as to the social interaction between the races in the United States.

In addition to Baldwin's praised work, Colm Tóibín, the author of five novels including The Master, has been looking at the large body of Baldwin's uncollected writing and speeches.

Walton Muyumba will moderate a discussion with Colm Tóibín, John Edgar Wideman, Manthia Diawara, Farah Jasmine Griffin, and Michael Thelwell examining James Baldwin?s lesser known works to cast a new light on his views on writers and writing, his politics, and his vision for the future of the United States.

About James Baldwin

James Baldwin was born in Harlem, New York City, in 1924. His first novel, Go Tell It on the Mountain, established him as a profound and permanent new voice in American letters. "Mountain is the book I had to write if I was ever going to write anything else," he remarked. Soon after his debut, Baldwin's play The Amen Corner was performed at Howard University and a collection of essays, Notes of a Native Son, was published. A second collection of essays, Nobody Knows My Name, was published between his novels Giovanni's Room and Another Country. The Fire Next Time, appearing just as the civil rights movement was exploding across the American South, galvanized the nation and continues to reverberate as perhaps the most prophetic and defining statement ever written of the continuing costs of Americans' refusal to face their own history. Other works include the play, Blues for Mister Charlie; a collection of short stories, Going to Meet the Man; and novels, Tell Me How Long the Train's Been Gone, If Beale Street Could Talk, and Just Above My Head; collections of essays, No Name in the Street, The Devil Finds Work, and The Price of the Ticket; a children's book, Little Man: A Story of Childhood; and a volume of poetry, Jimmy's Blues. Baldwin's last work, The Evidence of Things Not Seen, was prompted by a series of child murders in Atlanta. In 1986 Baldwin was made a Commander of the French Legion of Honor. Among the other awards he received are a Eugene F. Saxon Memorial Trust Award, a Rosenwald fellowship, a Guggenheim fellowship, a Partisan Review fellowship, and a Ford Foundation grant. James Baldwin died at his home in Saint-Paul-de-Vence, France, on December 1, 1987.

About Manthia Diawara

Manthia Diawara is Director of NYU's Institute of Afro-American Affairs and Director of the Africana Studies Program. He is the author of We Won't Budge: An African Exile in the World, Black-American Cinema: Aesthetics and Spectatorship, African Cinema: Politics and Culture, and In Search of Africa. Diawara also collaborated with Ngûgî wa Thiong’o in making the documentary Sembene Ousmane: The Making of the African Cinema.

About Farah Jasmine Griffin

Farah Jasmine Griffin is Professor of English and Comparative Literature and African American Studies at Columbia University. She is the author of three books, "Who Set You Flowin?:" The African-American Migration Narrative; If You Can't Be Free, Be a Mystery: In Search of Billie Holiday; and Clawing at the Limits of Cool: Miles Davis, John Coltrane, and the Greatest Jazz Collaboration Ever with Salim Washington. She has also edited and co-edited a number of volumes, including Uptown Conversation: The New Jazz Studies. Griffin was a Fellow at the Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers at New York Public Library.

About Walton Muyumba

Dr. Walton Muyumba is a writer and critic whose work has been published in the The Chicago Tribune, and the Dallas Morning News. He is also a professor of American literature and African American Studies at the University of North Texas in Dallas. Dr. Muyumba's book, The Shadow and the Act: African American Intellectuals, Jazz Improvisation, and Philosophical Pragmatism is forthcoming in 2009.

related website: studio-walton muyumba

 
About Michael Thelwell 

Michael Thelwell was the founding chairman of the Department of Afro-American Studies at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. He is the author of the novel The Harder They Come, which has become a classic of Jamaican literature; a collection of essays, Duties, Pleasures and Conflicts; and Ready for Revolution: The Life and Struggles of Stokely Carmichael, the memoir of the civil rights leader and Pan-Africanist revolutionary.

About Colm Tóibín

Colm Tóibín is the author of five novels, including The Master, which won the LA Times novel of the year in 2005, and a collection of short stories, Mothers and Sons. He is a regular contributor to the London Review of Books and the New York Review of Books. He is Stein Visiting Writer at Stanford University. Tóibín was a Fellow at the Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers at The New York Public Library.
 

About John Edgar Wideman

John Edgar Wideman is the author of more than twenty works of fiction and nonfiction, including Brothers and Keepers, Philadelphia Fire, and the story collection God's Gym. He is the recipient of two PEN/Faulkner Awards and has been nominated for the National Book Award. He teaches at Brown University.

SLAVOJ ŽIŽEK: A Lecture—Performance THEY LIVE! HOLLYWOOD AS AN IDEOLOGICAL MACHINE

Wednesday, March 12, 2008, 7 p.m.
  • Why did the dinosaurs attack in Jurassic Park?   
  • Why do historical events like The October Revolution happen?  
  • Why do asteroids hit the Earth?

Hollywood has the answer: either to create a couple or to find a father. And, surprisingly, the Stalinist cinema concurs, as we can see from The Fall of Berlin, the Soviet equivalent to Warren Beatty's Reds. Family ideology is alive and well today, in our allegedly post-ideological era. So, as an antidote, it is perhaps time to revisit forgotten Hollywood masterpieces, from John Frankenheimer's Seconds to John Carpenter's They Live.

ŽIŽEK on ŽIŽEK

Slavoj Žižek, philosopher and psychoanalyst with three basic orientations: a Hegelian in philosophy, a Lacanian in psychoanalysis, a Christian materialist in religion, and a Communist in politics. Arguably the only living philosopher who uses positively the terms "dialectical materialism" and "dictatorship of the proletariat", his work triggers continuous controversy: Welcome to the Desert of the Real, his analysis of 9/11, was attacked as anti-Semitic in Israel and as Zionist in Egypt. In his numerous books, he always returns to Hollywood - good cinema is for Žižek a school of critical dialectics for the uneducated masses.

About Slavoj Žižek

Slavoj Žižek, dialectical-materialist philosopher and psychoanalyst, is Co-Director of the International Center for Humanities, Birkbeck College, University of London. Among his latest publications are The Parallax View, How To Read Lacan, Enjoy Your Symptom!: Jacques Lacan in Hollywood and Out, For They Know Not What They Do: Enjoyment as a Political Factor, and, in April 2008, In Defense of Lost Causes.

EDIBLE ESTATES: Attack on the Front Lawn Fritz Haeg, Peter Sellars, Dolores Hayden, Frederick Kaufman, Shamim Momin & Paul Holdengräber

Friday, March 7, 2008, 6 p.m.

"What Is Wrong with an Edible Estate?"

In 2005, Los Angeles architect and artist Fritz Haeg planted the first "edible estate" garden in Salina, Kansas the geographic center of the United States. One front lawn at a time, the Edible Estate project is replacing the domestic front lawn with a highly productive, edible, organic garden landscape. Three more prototype gardens have since been created in California, New Jersey, and England, with two more Edible Estates forthcoming in Texas and Maryland.

The publication of Haeg's new book, Edible Estates: Attack on the Front Lawn, marks the beginning of a concerted national campaign to dramatically overthrow an American institution, the front lawn. Gardens of food will be promoted to fill these toxic spaces that currently divide our neighborhoods, devour precious resources, and pollute our air and water.

The Edible Estates project is at the nexus of many disciplines and current topics of interest: global/local food production, art as social action, radical gardening, urban agriculture, gardening as a public spectacle, food security, water and energy use, peak oil and the uncertain future of suburbia, the blurring of public and private in the front yard, community and neighbor relations, the phenomenon of the American front lawn, etc. However, this alternative project brings with it a new set of questions.

A public debate with project creator Fritz Haeg; theater director, Peter Sellars; author and Yale professor of architecture, Dolores Hayden; author of A Short History of the American Stomach, Frederick Kaufman; 2008 Whitney Biennial curator, Shamim Momin; and director of LIVE from the NYPL, Paul Holdengräber will engage the audience in an open discussion with the question, ?What is wrong with an Edible Estate?

A projection screen will alternately display the Edible Estates videos and time-lapse images depicting the removal of the front lawn and the planting and growth of the four Edible Estates gardens in Kansas, California, New Jersey, and London.

About Fritz Haeg

Fritz Haeg works between his architecture and design practice, Fritz Haeg Studio; the happenings and gatherings of Sundown Salon; the ecology initiatives of Gardenlab, which include Edible Estates; and his role as an educator. He has variously taught in architecture, design, and fine art programs at CalArts, Art Center College of Design, Parsons, and the University of Southern California. In 2006 Haeg initiated Sundown Schoolhouse, the alternative educational environment based in his geodesic dome in Los Angeles. He has produced projects and exhibited work at the Tate Modern; the Whitney Museum of American Art; Mass MoCA; the Institute of Contemporary Art, Philadelphia; among other institutions. His new on-going series of projects called "Animal Estates" will debut at the Whitney Biennial in 2008 with a commissioned installation in front of the museum. Edible Estates: Attack on the Front Lawn is his first book. 

About Peter Sellars

Theater, opera, and festival director Peter Sellars is known for ground-breaking interpretations of classic works. Whether it is Mozart, Handel, Shakespeare, Sophocles, or the 16th-century Chinese playwright Tang Xianzu, Sellars strikes a universal chord with audiences, engaging contemporary social and political issues. He has staged operas at the Chicago Lyric Opera, the Glyndebourne Festival, the Netherlands Opera, the Op?ra National de Paris, and the San Francisco Opera, among others. Following his iconic stagings of Le Nozze di Figaro, Don Giovanni, and Cosi fan tutte, Mr. Sellars established a reputation for bringing 20th-century and contemporary operas to the stage and has expanded the repertoire of modern opera. He has collaborated with John Adams on Nixon in China, The Death of Klinghoffer, El Ni'o, Doctor Atomic, and, most recently, A Flowering Tree. Sellars has led several major arts festivals, including the 1990/1993 Los Angeles Festivals, the 2002 Adelaide Festival in Australia; and the 2003 Venice Biennale International Festival of Theater in Italy and the 2006 festival in Vienna, New Crowned Hope, celebrating the 250th anniversary of Mozart's birth. Sellars is a professor in the department of World Arts and Cultures at UCLA and a resident curator of the Telluride Film Festival. 

About Dolores Hayden

Dolores Hayden is Professor of Architecture, Urbanism, and American Studies at Yale University and has written extensively about the history of American urban landscapes and the politics of design. She is the author of Building Suburbia: Green Fields and Urban Growth, 1820-2000; A Field Guide to Sprawl; Redesigning the American Dream: Gender, Housing, and Family Life; and The Power of Place: Urban Landscapes as Public History. Hayden is also a poet whose work has appeared in literary journals such as The Yale Review, Southwest Review, and The Kenyon Review. Her most recent poetry collection is American Yard.

About Frederick Kaufman

Frederick Kaufman is the author of A Short History of the American Stomach. A professor at the City University of New York's Graduate School of Journalism, he has written about food culture and other subjects for Harper's Magazine, Gastronomica, and The New York Times Sunday Magazine, among others.

About Shamim Momin

Shamim Momin is associate curator at the Whitney Museum of American Art and branch director and curator of the Whitney Museum of American Art at Altria. Momin was a co-curator of the 2004 Whitney Biennial and has curated numerous exhibitions for the Whitney Museum, including Terence Koh, Mark Grotjahn, Raymond Pettibon, and Banks Violette: Untitled. Exhibitions at Altria have included projects with artists such as Andrea Zittel, Rob Fischer, Sue de Beer, Mark Bradford, and Ellen Harvey. Momin has contributed essays to numerous other monograph collections, art periodicals, and exhibition catalogues, most recently as an author for the Phaidon Ice Cream series. She is co-curator of the 2008 Whitney Biennial

About Paul Holdengräber

Paul Holdengräber is the Director of Public Programs now known as "LIVE from the NYPL" for The Research Libraries of The New York Public Library.

SAMANTHA POWER in conversation with AZAR NAFISI: Chasing the Flame: Sergio Vieira de Mello & the Fight to Save the World

Thursday, February 21, 2008, 6 p.m.

Barack Obama's Senior Foreign Policy Advisor, Samantha Power, examines in her new book, Chasing the Flame: Sergio Vieira de Mello and the Fight to Save the World, the humanitarian work of Vieira de Mello who as an idealist and fierce pragmatist worked in more war zones than any other person in his generation. Described as a cross between James Bond and Bobby Kennedy, UN Secretary General's Special Envoy Sergio Vieira de Mello died on August 19, 2003, when a suicide bomber detonated a truck of explosives in Baghdad.

Known for his adaptive and pragmatic problem-solving skills and suave negotiating tactics, Vieira de Mello had a 35-year head-start at thinking about some of the biggest questions consuming us today. Power states that Vieira de Mello had long ago stopped believing that he brought solutions to a troubled place, but he knew how to ask the questions that helped expose constructive ideas.

In conversation with Azar Nafisi, author of Reading Lolita in Tehran: A Memoir in Books, Power will address the question, ?Who possesses the moral authority, the political sense, and the military and economic heft to protect human life and bring peace to the unruly world order. Examining the life of Sergio Vieira de Mello yields vital lessons for us today with his unique expertise on how to unite as nations, rebuild our international institutions, and establish peace and security in those parts of our world that need them the most.

About Samantha Power

Samantha Power is the Anna Lindh Professor of Global Leadership and Public Policy Practice at Harvard University's John F. Kennedy School of Government, Senior Foreign Policy Advisor to Barack Obama, and a foreign policy columnist at Time magazine. In 2003, her book, A Problem from Hell: America and the Age of Genocide, was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for General Nonfiction, the National Book Critics Circle Award for general nonfiction, the J. Anthony Lukas Book Prize, and the Council on Foreign Relations. Arthur Ross Prize for the best book in U.S. foreign policy. Her new book is Chasing the Flame: Sergio Vieira de Mello and the Fight to Save the World.

About Azar Nafisi

Azar Nafisi is a professor of aesthetics, culture, and literature at the School of Advanced International Studies at Johns Hopkins University and the author of Reading Lolita in Tehran: A Memoir in Books and Anti-Terra: A Critical Study of Vladimir Nabokov's Novels. Nafisi has written for The New York Times, Washington Post, and The Wall Street Journal. Her cover story, "The Veiled Threat: The Iranian Revolution's Woman Problem" published in The New Republic, has been reprinted into several languages. Her new book, Things I Have Been Silent About, a memoir about her mother, is scheduled to be published in spring 2008.

KRISTA TIPPETT & STUART BROWN in conversation with Paul Holdengräber: FOR PLAY

Tuesday, January 29, 2008, 6 p.m.

Krista Tippett, host of public radio's Speaking of Faith, and Stuart Brown, founder of The National Institute for Play, will continue a nationally broadcasted conversation that unexpectedly became deeply connected to the relationships between the vitality of living life and of religious practices. Are faith and playfulness connected? Can healthy play be the basis for healthy spirituality? Is play more important than prayer or meditation? How do spiritual quests for a meaningful life, and a scientific study of play overlap? Or do they?

In her book, Speaking of Faith: Why Religion Matters and How to Talk About It, Tippett brings tolerance, compassion, understanding, and the exploration of evil and virtue into perspectives through her life experiences and personal interviews with worldwide luminaries. Her expositions of her paths from fundamentalism to agnosticism to a faith-based embrace of the mysteries of existence deliver enchantment.

Brown's path toward "enlightenment" is of a different perspective. From a detailed study of murderers who had never engaged in play, to chasing animals at play in the wild worldwide, to becoming immersed in the developmental neurobiology of play, he finds much empathy and parallelism with the wisdom that Tippett has discovered on her spiritual life path.

Stuart Brown finds play ?takes one out of time? into eternities?sunrise while Tippett's explorations frame our inherent quest for answers through faith and ritual. Paul Holdengräber will ignite the fuel for discovery as these two explorers from different continents encounter themselves in a deep dialogue.

About Stuart Brown

Trained in medicine, psychiatry, and clinical research, Stuart Brown discovered the importance of play by discerning its absence in a studied group of homicidal young males. As Clinical Director and Chief of Psychiatry at Mercy Hospital and a professor at University of California, San Diego, he interviewed thousands of people to capture their play profiles identifying negative consequences in a play-deprived life. After his clinical career, he became the founder of The National Institute for Play. With the support of the National Geographic Society and Jane Goodall, he observed animal play in the wild and began to see play as a long evolved behavior important for the well being and survival of animals. He subsequently came to understand that humans are uniquely designed by nature to enjoy and participate in play throughout life.

About Krista Tippett

A journalist and former diplomat, Krista Tippett conceived the idea for Speaking of Faith while consulting for the ecumenical institute of St. John's Abbey, Collegeville. She has hosted and produced the now national weekly program at American Public Media since it began in 2000. Tippett is a graduate of Yale Divinity School and a former Fulbright Scholar. In divided Berlin in the 1980's, she reported for The New York Times, Newsweek, the BBC, among others, and served as special assistant to the U.S. ambassador to the former West Germany. Her first book, Speaking of Faith: Why Religion Matters and How to Talk About It, was published in 2007.

About Paul Holdengraber

Paul Holdengräber is the Director of Public Programs now known as "LIVE from the NYPL" for The Research Libraries of The New York Public Library.

Opening Night! JOHN RICHARDSON in conversation with ROBERT HUGHES: The Paradox of Picasso and The Role of the Biographer

Thursday, January 24, 2008, 6 p.m.

"My work is my diary," Picasso said, and John Richardson addresses his paintings and sculptures in that light: not only as the stunning manifestation of the artist's protean imagination but also as a mirror, held up to the man himself, in which we can see what might otherwise have been hidden.

John Richardson's new book, A Life of Picasso: The Triumphant Years, 1917-1932, is the third volume of a biography that reveals the artist's life during the time that he created some of his most important sculpture and painting. These are the years that Picasso was part of a group in Paris that included Braque, Apollinaire, Miró, Man Ray, and Breton, and when in the south of France, spent summers in the company of Hemmingway and Fitzgerald. It was during this time that he was married to the ballerina Olga Khokhlova and had his passionate affair with Marie-Thérèse  Walter, who was, as well, his model and muse.

About John Richardson 

John Richardson is the author of a memoir, The Sorcerer's Apprentice; an essay collection, Sacred Monsters, Sacred Masters; and books on Manet and Braque. He has written for The New York Review of Books, The New Yorker, and Vanity Fair. He was instrumental in establishing Christie's in the United States. In 1993, he was made a Corresponding Fellow of the British Academy and from 1995 to 1996, he served as the Slade Professor of Fine Art at Oxford University. He divides his time between Connecticut and New York City.

About Robert Hughes 

Robert Hughes has written for such publications as The Spectator, The Daily Telegraph, The Times, and The Observer in London and was art critic for Time magazine for thirty years. His books include The Culture of Complaint, Barcelona, The Fatal Shore, Nothing If Not Critical, Heaven and Hell in Western Art, Goya, and most recently Things I Didn't Know: A Memoir. His television series include The Shock Of The New, American Visions, and Australia: Beyond the Fatal Shore, as well as numerous documentaries, most recently Goya: Crazy Like a Genius. Hughes is the only art critic to twice receive the Frank Jewett Mather Award, given by the College Art Association of America. He lives in New York.

NICHOLAS KRISTOF: Darfur The First Genocide of the 21st Century

Friday, November 30, 2007, 6 p.m.

The Robert B. Silvers Lecture

The New York Times columnist, Nicholas Kristof, will discuss genocide in Darfur based on his eight trips to the region, and the challenges of covering neglected stories from the developing world that the U.S. and other nations have failed to address. This presentation will be illustrated with photos and a video from Darfur.

About Nicholas Kristof

Nicholas Kristof writes op-ed columns for The New York Times. His columns have often focused on global health, poverty and gender issues in the developing world. Since 2004 he has written dozens of columns about Darfur and visited the area eight times. He has received two Pulitzer Prizes?one for his reporting with his wife, Sheryl WuDunn, on China's Tiananmen Square democracy movement and the other for his reporting on Darfur. He has been a Times correspondent since 1984, becoming an associate managing editor and the first blogger on The New York Times Website. Kristof has lived on four continents, reported on six, and traveled to 120 countries, plus all 50 states, every Chinese province and every main Japanese island. Kristof and WuDunn are authors of China Wakes: The Struggle for the Soul of a Rising Power and Thunder from the East: Portrait of a Rising Asia.

 About The Robert B. Silvers Lecture

The Robert B. Silvers Lecture is an annual series created by Max Palevsky in recognition of the work of Robert B. Silvers, editor of The New York Review of Books, of which he was a founder in 1963. The series features contemporary people whose fields correspond to the broad range of Mr. Silver?s interests in literature, the arts, politics, economics, history, and the sciences.

CEES NOOTEBOOM in conversation with Paul Holdengräber: Lost Paradise

Monday, November 19, 2007, 6 p.m.

In Lost Paradise: A Novel, eminent Dutch novelist Cees Nooteboom weaves an imaginative tale of two unrelated travelers a beautiful stranger aboard a Berlin-bound flight and a haggard-looking man on a Holland train platform whose intersecting paths illuminate the ways in which the divine touches our lives. With his fleeting impressions of these encounters, Nooteboom builds a complex, haunting story of longing, regret, and rebirth in the dawn of the new millennium.

Nooteboom writes about the ecstasy, and ultimately the frustration of grasping onto something doomed to disappear or the unwillingness to resign oneself to an inescapable farewell. The simple conclusion to a complicated love story is that angels don't belong with humans. Lost Paradise is a novel as light and ungraspable as a poem, yet seems to be about everything in life, including the fall from grace and cosmically thwarted love while affirming our underlying humanity in an increasingly fragmented age.

About Cees Nooteboom

Dutch writer Cees Nooteboom debuted in 1955 with the novel Philip and the Others and has since written novels, poetry, short stories and travelogues. His work has earned him numerous awards, among which the Bordewijk Prize, the Pegasus Prize for Rituals and the Aristeion European Prize for Literature for The Following Story. The latter was translated into over twenty languages and signaled his international breakthrough. In 2004 he was awarded the P.C. Hooft Prize for his entire oeuvre. Among his other books are the travelogues Berlin Notes, Roads to Santiago, and the novels All Souls? Day and his latest book, Lost Paradise: A Novel.

About Paul Holdengräber

Paul Holdengräber is the Director of Public Programs now known as "LIVE from the NYPL" for The Research Libraries of The New York Public Library.

PIERRE BAYARD & UMBERTO ECO with Paul Holdengraber: How to Talk About Books You Haven't Read

Saturday, November 17, 2007, 5 p.m.

"I never read a book I must review; it prejudices you so." Oscar Wilde

How To Talk About Books You Haven't Read

  • Ways of Not Reading: Books You Don't Know; Books You Have Skimmed; Books You Have Heard of.  
  • Literary Confrontations: Encounters with Professors; Enco  
  • Ways of Behaving: Not Being Ashamed; Inventing Books.

?from the Table of Contents

Umberto Eco insists that he read Pierre Bayard's book, How to Talk About Books You Haven't Read or at least skimmed it. In the July 26th edition of L’Espresso Eco writes, ?The most intriguing part of this pamphlet, less paradoxical than may first appear, is that we forget a high percentage of the books we actually read, in fact, we conjure a virtual image of sorts, not so much of what the book said, but of what it made us think about.?

UMBERTO ECO in conversation with Paul Holdengräber: On Ugliness, Hot Wars & Media Populism

Thursday, November 15, 2007, 6 p.m.

On Ugliness is an extraordinary road map to the perception of the grotesque over the centuries. Following on the heels of the book, History of Beauty, writer and scholar Umberto Eco considers how we perceive and define the corollary the depiction of ugliness the complete absence of beauty from Ancient Greece to the present day.

Eco begins his fascinating discussion with the observation that the aesthetics of beauty have been defined and documented through the ages by philosophers, artists, and writers, while the same cannot be said for ugliness. Though ostensibly opposites, one thing beauty and ugliness share is the fact that they are defined by the culture and by the times what is ugly in Paris may be beautiful in Papua, and what was beautiful in the 19th century, may be considered ugly in the 21st. Quoting from Hegel and Nietzsche, Plutarch, Aristotle and Darwin, Eco identifies three different phenomena: ugliness in itself, formal ugliness, and the artistic portrayal of both. As Eco states, we can almost always infer what the first two types of ugliness were [in a given time in history, and a particular society] solely based on the evidence of the third type.

Eco intertwines his own lively, provocative text with the writings of philosophers, novelists, and poets to explore his subject matter which includes:

• Ugliness in the classical world such as pagan monsters and mythological creatures whose ugly forms reinforce their frightening cultural purpose

• The ugly side of Christianity as demonstrated by vivid depictions of the suffering of Christ and the Crucifixion, the martyrdom of saints, and the concept of Death

•The apocalypse, hell, and the devil to symbolize the consequences of digression from the path of faith

• The ugly, the comic, the obscene examines satire and caricature

•The ugliness of woman in the analysis of the demonization of women by men to reveal their supposed malice and threatening sexual powers

•Deformity, birth defects, and disfiguring disease along with distasteful racial and religious stereotyping by physiognomy

• Ugliness made manifest through disturbing events, fear-filled dreams, horror and fantasy

• The ugliness inherent in industrialization of society and the low life of poverty

• The avant-garde and how it demonstrates the evolution of the acceptance of the ugly in art

•The ugliness of kitsch and camp a social phenomenon defined by taste distinctions of class and wealth

• Ugliness today in the selected writings of Stephen King and Italo Calvino, images of E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial, Star Wars? Yoda, and performer Marilyn Manson

In Turning Back The Clock, Hot Wars and Media Populism, the time is 2000 to 2005, the years of neoconservatism, terrorism, the twenty-four-hour news cycle, the ascension of Bush, Blair, and Berlusconi, and the invasions of Afghanistan and Iraq. Umberto Eco's response is a provocative, passionate, and witty series of essays which originally appeared in the Italian newspapers La Repubblica and L’Espresso that leaves no slogan unexamined, no innovation unexposed. What led us into this age of hot wars and media populism, and how was it sold to us as progress Eco discusses such topics as racism, mythology, the European Union, rhetoric, the Middle East, technology, September 11, medieval Latin, television ads, globalization, Harry Potter, anti-Semitism, logic, the Tower of Babel, intelligent design, Italian street demonstrations, fundamentalism, The Da Vinci Code, and magic and magical thinking.

Eco shows his practical, engaged side: an intellectual involved in events both local and global, a man concerned about taste, politics, education, ethics, and where our troubled world is headed.

About Umberto Eco

Umberto Eco teaches Semiotics and is the President of the Scuola superiore di Studi Umanistici at the University of Bologna. In 1980 Eco debuted as a novelist with The Name of the Rose for which he received the Strega Award. Since then his books include Foucault's Pendulum, The Island of the Day Before, Baudolino, and The Mysterious Flame of Queen Loana. Amongst his essays are The Open Work, A Theory of Semiotics, The Role of the Reader, Semiotics and the Philosophy of Language, The Limits of Interpretation, The Search for the Perfect Language, Six Walks in the Fictional Woods, Kant and the Plathypus, and On Literature. He is the author of the History of Beauty. His new books are On Ugliness and Turning Back The Clock, Hot Wars and Media Populism

About Paul Holdengräber

Paul Holdengräber is the Director of Public Programs now known as "LIVE from the NYPL" for The Research Libraries of The New York Public Library.

CARYL PHILLIPS in conversation with IAN BURUMA: Foreigners, Race, Class & Antisemitism

Monday, November 12, 2007, 6 p.m.

Caryl Phillips: "I'd like to hear about Ian Buruma's experiences of belonging and feeling an outsider in England, and any literature or art forms that have helped him understand the English or notions of being an outsider... Ian's book on the murder of Theo Van Gogh takes the debate about identity and belonging in Europe beyond issues of race and class and tackles the important place we're now at, which is grappling with notions of faith and Islam. I'm very interested in the role that literature can play in negotiating a middle passage between a politically sponsored monocultural approach and an equally potentially treacherous multicultural alternative."

Ian Buruma: "A strand running through Caryl Phillips' new book Foreigners (and to some extent even mine, about Theo van Gogh) is the overlap between race and class. Britain, in comparison to Holland, say, or Germany, was perhaps always more class than race oriented--hence the fact that Indian aristocrats could play for the English cricket team, or enter English clubs--something less common in other European empires."

Caryl Phillips new book Foreigners is a hybrid of reportage, fiction, and historical fact that tells the stories of three black men whose lives speak resoundingly to the place and role of the foreigner in English society.

Together Caryl Phillips and Ian Buruma will discuss notions of identity, belonging, race, class, anti-semitism, and faith and Islam, which affect present-day Europe, reflecting on how these issues are examined in literature and the broader culture.

About Caryl Phillips

Caryl Phillips was born in St. Kitts, West Indies, and brought up in England. He is the author of three books of nonfiction and eight novels. His most recent book, Dancing in the Dark, won the 2006 PEN/Beyond Margins Award; A Distant Shore won the 2004 Commonwealth Prize. His other awards include the Martin Luther King Memorial Prize, a Guggenheim fellowship, and the James Tait Black Memorial Prize. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature and currently lives in New York. His new book is Foreigners.

About Ian Buruma

Ian Buruma was born in the Netherlands. He studied Chinese at Leyden University and cinema at Nihon University in Tokyo. Living in Amsterdam, Hong Kong, Berlin, Washington DC, London, Oxford, and New York City, he has worked as a journalist, filmmaker, and author. His latest book, Murder in Amsterdam, won the LA Times Book Award. He is a frequent contributor to the New York Review of Books, and Henry Luce Professor at Bard College. He lives in Milan, New York.

PÉTER NÁDAS in conversation with Paul Holdengräber: Fire and Knowledge

Friday, November 9, 2007, 6 p.m.

"My first memory is of a dark landing of a Budapest tenement building, as we are flying toward and then smashing into a wall ablaze with cold flames. Or, perhaps it is not we who are flying but the flaming walls are falling on us. Someone is holding me as I am flying high above the stairs. Then, there are no more cold flames, no more falling, and no more up and down, just darkness, warmth, and nothingness. This memory must date from the second year of my life, from the time of the more than three-month long siege of Budapest." Péter Nádas has had a major presence in European life and letters: as a trenchant commentator on the events that have transformed his country and all of Europe since 1989, as a stunning literary critic, as a subtle interpreter of language and politics in societies both free and unfree, and as a moralist with a discerning eye for the crippling effects of deception and hypocrisy upon us all.

His new book, Fire and Knowledge: Fiction and Essays, acquaints us more fully with Nádas's evolution as a writer of fiction, for it includes stories dating from the 1960s and 1970s, when he had to write in extremely stringent, even dangerous circumstances, as well as some from more recent years, since the publication of his major novels and the reintegration of Western and Eastern Europe.

About Péter Nádas

Writer, essayist, critic, and playwright Péter Nádas makes his home in Gombosszeg, a small village in western Hungary. His writings include collections of essays (Stage Set, On Heavenly and Earthly Love, Dialogue, Scrapes of Paper and other Miscellaneous Writings, Essays), novellas (Yearbook and Procession), and novels (A Book of Memories and Parallel Stories). His new book is Fire and Knowledge: Fiction and Essays.

About Paul Holdengräber

Paul Holdengräber is the Director of Public Programs now known as "LIVE from the NYPL" for The Research Libraries of The New York Public Library.

THERE YOU GO AGAIN: Orwell Comes to America Part III SOLUTIONS: THE FUTURE POLITICAL LANDSCAPE

Wednesday, November 7, 2007, 3 p.m.

On the 60th anniversary of Orwell's Politics and the English Language, George Orwell described political speech as consisting ?largely of euphemism, question-begging and sheer cloudy vagueness. Some six decades later, many symptoms of manipulation and propaganda diagnosed by Orwell persist on the American political landscape, along with new disinformation techniques enabled by modern technology.

Historians, scientists, philosophers, linguists, cognitive experts, journalists, image-makers, and public figures will debate in three separate sessions the current state of political discourse?and journalism's response to it on the dawn of a bitterly contested presidential campaign.

Part I Propaganda Then and Now: What Orwell Did and Didn't Know

Part II Deceiving Images: The Science of Manipulation

Part III Solutions: The Future Political Landscape

Each session will explore the past, present, and future of deceptive political speech, and assess what can be done to bring more realism and honesty into the conduct of America?s public affairs.

This event is co-sponsored by the Open Society Institute.

III. SOLUTIONS: THE FUTURE POLITICAL LANDSCAPE

Moderator:

Ernest J. Wilson III, dean and Walter Annenberg Chair in Communication, Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Southern California

Panelists:

Michael J. Copps, commissioner, Federal Communications Commission

Charlayne Hunter-Gault, broadcast journalist, former CNN bureau chief, and chief national correspondent, The Newshour with Jim Lehrer

Josh Marshall, publisher of Talking Points Memo, TPMmuckraker, TPM Election Central, and TPMCafe

Alessandra Stanley, television critic and former Moscow-bureau co-chief, The New York Times

About Michael J. Copps

Michael J. Copps was sworn in for a second term as a member of the Federal Communications Commission in January 2006. His term runs until 2010. From 1998 to 2001, he was assistant secretary of commerce for trade development at the U.S. Department of Commerce, where he worked to improve market access and market share for nearly every sector of American industry and devoted much of his time to building private sector-public sector partnerships. From 1993 to 1998, he served as deputy assistant secretary for basic industries, a component of the Trade Development Unit. Mr. Copps moved to Washington, D.C., in 1970, joined the staff of Senator Fritz Hollings (D-SC), and served for more than a dozen years as his administrative assistant and chief of staff. He has been director of government affairs for a Fortune 500 company and senior vice president for legislative affairs at a major national trade association. He holds a Ph.D. from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and has taught history at Loyola University of the South. A native of Milwaukee, he lives in Alexandria, Virginia.

About Charlayne Hunter-Gault

Charlayne Hunter-Gault is a journalist and international correspondent who has reported for PBS, NPR, and most recently CNN, as Johannesburg bureau chief. She was the chief national correspondent for The NewsHour with Jim Lehrer on PBS from 1983 to 1997. During her tenure at the NewsHour, which she joined in 1978, she won two Emmys, a Peabody for excellence in broadcast journalism, and a Journalist of the Year Award from the National Association of Black Journalists. She has been an editor for Trans-Action Magazine, a reporter at The New Yorker, and an investigative reporter and anchorwoman on WRC-TV's evening news. She later joined The New York Times as a metropolitan reporter covering the urban African-American community. She has been published in The New York Times Magazine, Saturday Review, The New York Times Book Review, Essence, and Vogue. Born in Due West, South Carolina, she made civil-rights history as the first African-American woman to enter the University of Georgia, the topic of her memoir In My Place. She has received more than two dozen honorary degrees.

About Josh Marshall

Josh Marshall is the publisher of Talking Points Memo, TPMmuckraker, TPM Election Central and TPMCafe. He also writes a weekly column for the Capitol Hill newspaper The Hill. His articles on politics and foreign affairs have appeared in numerous magazines and newspapers across the United States as well as abroad, including The American Prospect, The Atlantic Monthly, The Boston Globe, The Financial Times, , The New Republic, The New Yorker, The New York Post, The New York Times, Salon and Slate. Marshall graduated from Princeton in 1991 and holds a doctorate in American history from Brown. He lives in New York City with his wife Millet, their son Sam, and their dog Simon.

About Alessandra Stanley

Alessandra Stanley was named chief television critic for The New York Times in 2003. Before that, she was a foreign correspondent for the newspaper, serving as Rome bureau chief (1998-2001) and co-chief of the Moscow bureau (1994-1998). She has also covered national politics and metropolitan news for the Times. Ms. Stanley has served as a writer and correspondent for Time, working in Paris, Los Angeles, New York, and finally, Washington, D.C., covering The White House and presidential campaigns. While at Time, she reported from Central America, Afghanistan, Asia and Africa. She has also written for The New York Times Magazine, The New Republic, GQ and Vogue. Born in Boston, MA, Ms. Stanley grew up in Washington, D.C. and Europe, and studied literature at Harvard University. She lives in New York City with her daughter.

About Ernest J. Wilson III

Ernest J. Wilson III became dean of the USC Annenberg School for Communication in July 2007. He was previously a professor and senior research scholar at the University of Maryland, College Park, where he was director of the Center for International Development and Conflict Management. He has also served on the faculties of the University of Michigan and the University of Pennsylvania. His scholarship focuses on the convergence of communication and information technology, public policy, and the public interest. His current work concentrates on China-Africa relations, global sustainable innovation, and the role of politics in the diffusion of communications technology. Nominated by President Bill Clinton and reappointed by President George W. Bush, Dean Wilson is the ranking senior member of the board of directors of the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. He has also held positions with the National Security Council, the U.S. Information Agency, and the Global Information Infrastructure Commission. Originally from Washington, D.C., he earned a B.A. from Harvard College Ph.D. and an M.A. in political science from the University of California, Berkeley.

THERE YOU GO AGAIN: Orwell Comes to America Part II DECEIVING IMAGES: THE SCIENCE OF MANIPULATION

Wednesday, November 7, 2007, 1 p.m.

On the 60th anniversary of Orwell's Politics and the English Language, George Orwell described political speech as consisting largely of euphemism, question-begging and sheer cloudy vagueness. Some six decades later, many symptoms of manipulation and propaganda diagnosed by Orwell persist on the American political landscape, along with new disinformation techniques enabled by modern technology.

Historians, scientists, philosophers, linguists, cognitive experts, journalists, image-makers, and public figures will debate in three separate sessions the current state of political discourse and journalism's response to it on the dawn of a bitterly contested presidential campaign.

Part I Propaganda Then and Now: What Orwell Did and Didn't Know

Part II Deceiving Images: The Science of Manipulation

Part III Solutions: The Future Political Landscape

Each session will explore the past, present, and future of deceptive political speech, and assess what can be done to bring more realism and honesty into the conduct of America's public affairs.

This event is co-sponsored by the Open Society Institute.

II. DECEIVING IMAGES: THE SCIENCE OF MANIPULATION

Moderator:

Nicholas Lemann, dean and Henry R. Luce Professor, The Journalism School, Columbia University

Panelists:

George Lakoff, Goldman Distinguished Professor of Cognitive Science and Linguistics, UC Berkeley; senior fellow, Rockridge Institute

Frank Luntz, political pollster and consultant; author of Words That Work: It's Not What You Say, It's What People Hear

Deborah Tannen, University Professor and professor of linguistics, Georgetown University; author of fourteen books on language, communication, and perception

Drew Westen, professor of psychology/psychiatry and behavioral sciences, Emory University; author of The Political Brain: The Role of Emotion in Deciding the Fate of the Nation

About George Lakoff

George Lakoff is Goldman Distinguished Professor of Cognitive Science and Linguistics at the University of California, Berkeley, and senior fellow at the Rockridge Institute, where he studies the framing of issues in politics. He is one of the world's best-known linguists and a founder of the field of cognitive science. He has published hundreds of articles and numerous books on linguistics, psychology, poetics, philosophy, and mathematics. Among his works on mind and language are Metaphors We Live By (with Mark Johnson); Moral Politics; Don't Think of an Elephant!; and Whose Freedom?: The Battle over America's Most Important Idea, and Thinking Points (with the Rockridge Institute). His next book, The Political Mind is an introduction to recent scientific results about the brain and mind that have a bearing on politics. As a private citizen, he helps progressive citizens' groups, activists, and policy makers think through their values and principles, formulate policies, and frame issues to express their deepest beliefs more effectively.

About Nicholas Lemann

Nicholas Lemann is dean of the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism. Lemann has published five books, most recently Redemption: The Last Battle of the Civil War The Big Test: The Secret History of the American Meritocracy, which helped lead to a major reform of the SAT; and The Promised Land: The Great Black Migration and How It Changed America, which won several book prizes. He has written widely for such publications as The New York Times, The New York Review of Books, The New Republic, and American Heritage; worked in documentary television with Blackside, Frontline, the Discovery Channel, and the BBC; and lectured at many universities. Lemann continues to write for The New Yorker and serves on the boards of directors of the Authors Guild, the Center for the Humanities at the City University of New York Graduate Center, and the Society of American Historians, and is a member of the New York Institute for the Humanities. He lives with his family in New York City.

About Frank Luntz

Frank Luntz has been called the "hottest pollster" in America by The Boston Globe, and was named one of four "top research minds" by Business Week. He was the winner of the coveted Washington Post "Crystal Ball" award for being the most accurate pundit in 1992. Luntz has written, supervised, and conducted more than 1,500 surveys, focus groups, and dial sessions in more than two dozen countries and four continents over the past decade, and is the pioneer of the "instant response" focus-group technique. He consults Fortune 100 companies ? from General Motors to Federal Express, Disney to American Express, AT&T to Pfizer, Kroger supermarkets to McDonald's and the entire soft-drink and motion-picture industries, as well as the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, the National Association of Manufacturers, and the Business Roundtable on communication and language. He also served as a consultant to the award-winning NBC hit show The West Wing. He is the author of Words That Work: It's Not What You Say, It's What People Hear.

About Deborah Tannen

Deborah Tannen is a University Professor and professor of linguistics at Georgetown University. In addition to her fourteen academic books and more than a hundred articles, she has written six books for general audiences, including You Just Don't Understand: Women and Men in Conversation, which was on the New York Times best-seller list for nearly four years and has been translated into twenty-nine languages. The Argument Culture won the Common Ground Book Award. She has received fellowships and grants from the Rockefeller Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the National Science Foundation, and the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. She has been McGraw Distinguished Lecturer at Princeton University and has received five honorary doctorates. She is a frequent guest on television and radio news and information shows. Her first play, An Act of Devotion, is included in Best American Short Plays 1993-1994.

About Drew Westen

Drew Westen is a clinical, personality, and political psychologist and a professor in the departments of psychology/psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Emory University. As the founder of Westen Strategies, a consulting firm, he advises Democratic leaders and candidates. He holds a B.A. from Harvard, an M.A. in social and political thought from the University of Sussex (England), and a Ph.D. in clinical psychology from the University of Michigan. He has been chief psychologist at Cambridge Hospital and an associate professor at Harvard Medical School. He is a blogger for The Huffington Post and a commentator on NPR's All Things Considered. His book, The Political Brain: The Role of Emotion in Deciding the Fate of the Nation, explores how politicians can capture the hearts and minds of voters through examples of what candidates have said or could have said in debates, speeches, and ads. He lives in Atlanta.

THERE YOU GO AGAIN: Orwell Comes to America Part I PROPAGANDA THEN AND NOW: WHAT ORWELL DID AND DIDN'T KNOW

Wednesday, November 7, 2007, 9 a.m.

On the 60th anniversary of Orwell's Politics and the English Language, George Orwell described political speech as consisting largely of euphemism, question-begging and sheer cloudy vagueness. Some six decades later, many symptoms of manipulation and propaganda diagnosed by Orwell persist on the American political landscape, along with new disinformation techniques enabled by modern technology.

Historians, scientists, philosophers, linguists, cognitive experts, journalists, image-makers, and public figures will debate in three separate sessions the current state of political discourse?and journalism's response to it? on the dawn of a bitterly contested presidential campaign.

Part I Propaganda Then and Now: What Orwell Did and Didn't Know

Part II Deceiving Images: The Science of Manipulation

Part III Solutions: The Future Political Landscape

Each session will explore the past, present, and future of deceptive political speech, and assess what can be done to bring more realism and honesty into the conduct of America?s public affairs.

This event is co-sponsored by the Open Society Institute.

I. PROPAGANDA THEN AND NOW: WHAT ORWELL DID AND DIDN'T KNOW

Moderator:

Orville Schell, Arthur Ross Director, Center on U.S.-China Relations, Asia Society; former dean, UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism

Panelists:

Konstanty Gebert, Warsaw-based former Solidarity activist; columnist and international reporter, Gazeta Wyborcza

Masha Gessen, Moscow-based author and journalist; contributor to The New York Times, The New Republic, and US News and World Report

Jack Miles, senior fellow for religious affairs, Pacific Council on International Policy; distinguished professor of English and religious studies, UC Irvine

George Soros, chair of Soros Fund Management LLC; philanthropist and author

About Konstanty Gebert 

Konstanty Gebert, a former dissident activist, is a columnist and international reporter for the Polish newspaper Gazeta Wyborcza and a frequent contributor to international media. He was the co-founder of the (unofficial) Jewish Flying University in 1979, and of the Polish Council of Christians and Jews in 1980. In September 1980, he co-founded a white-collar trade union that soon merged with Solidarity, the independent self-governing trade union that precipitated the downfall of Polish Communism. After avoiding internment in the 1981 coup, Gebert became, under the pen name of Dawid Warszawski, a well-known editor and columnist for various underground publications. The author of eight books, he has served as a visiting professor at a number of American universities. He lives in Warsaw.

About Masha Gessen 

Masha Gessen is an author and a journalist living in Moscow. Her books about Russia are Ester and Ruzya: How My Grandmothers Survived Hitler's War and Stalin's Peace and Dead Again: The Russian Intelligentsia After Communism. She has written for and worked at many publications in Russia and the United States, including The New Republic, The New York Times, US News and World Report, Bolshoy Gorod, Itogi, and The Moscow Times. She was born in Moscow, emigrated to the United States with her family in 1981, and returned to Moscow as a reporter in the early 1990s. In addition to Russia, she has reported from the Balkans.

About Jack Miles 

Jack Miles is senior fellow for religious affairs of the Pacific Council on International Policy and Distinguished Professor of English and Religious Studies at the University of California, Irvine. A former MacArthur fellow, Miles won the Pulitzer Prize for God: A Biography, which has been translated into sixteen languages. His writing has appeared in The New York Times, The Boston Globe, and The Washington Post. Miles was a Jesuit seminarian, studying at the Pontifical Gregorian University and the Hebrew University in Jerusalem before earning a Ph.D. in Near Eastern Languages from Harvard. He is fluent in several modern languages. He serves on the final selection committee of the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation. A former literary editor and member of the Los Angeles Times editorial board, he is currently general editor of the forthcoming Norton Anthology of World Religions.

About Orville Schell 

Orville Schell is the former dean of the Graduate School of Journalism at the University of California, Berkeley, and the recently appointed Arthur Ross Director of the Center on U.S.-China Relations at the Asia Society in New York City. He is the author of more than a dozen books, nine of them about China, and a frequent contributor to major newspapers and magazines, including The New Yorker, The Atlantic, The New York Times Magazine, The Nation, The Los Angeles Times Magazine, Granta, Wired, Newsweek, Mother Jones, The China Quarterly, and The New York Review of Books. He has served as a television commentator for several network news programs, worked both as correspondent and a consultant for PBS Frontline documentaries, and been the correspondent for an Emmy Award-winning 60 Minutes segment. He divides his time between Berkeley and New York City.

About George Soros

George Soros is chair of Soros Fund Management LLC. Born in Budapest, he survived the Nazi occupation and fled Communist Hungary in 1947 for England, where he graduated from the London School of Economics. He then settled in the United States, where he accumulated a large fortune through an international investment fund he founded and managed. An active philanthropist since 1979, when he began providing funds to help black students attend Cape Town University in apartheid South Africa, Soros has established a network of philanthropic organizations in more than fifty countries. These organizations are dedicated to promoting the values of democracy and an open society. The foundation network spends about $450 million annually. Soros is the author of nine books, including most recently The Age of Fallibility. His articles and essays on politics, society, and economics regularly appear in major newspapers and magazines around the world. He lives in New York City.

BLIND SPOT: Collapsing Images Part III TRUTH AND AUTHENTICITY IN PHOTOGRAPHY

Saturday, November 3, 2007, 7:30 p.m.

Blind Spot is the international source book of photography-based fine art for artists, collectors, creative directors, designers, curators and art lovers. Blind Spot publishes new works by the world's most renowned artists and discovers vital new work by up-and-coming artists. The collaboration of the editors and the ideas expressed by the individual artists make each issue of Blind Spot emerge as a single work of art. Fourteen years old, Blind Spot has gained an international reputation for being a visual magazine that does not talk about imagery the content is imagery.

Collapsing Images Forum

As a counter-point to the visual conversation provided by the magazine, the Collapsing Images Forum aims to give a voice to the issues surrounding photography, and discuss the role of photography in the media and popular culture. Collapsing Images presents three vital discussions led by leading photographers, filmmakers and critics.

Part I A Conversation between Jack Pierson & Jerry Schatzberg (2:00 pm)

Part II Money, Money, Money, Money (4:30 pm)

Part III Truth and Authenticity in Photography (7:30 pm)

This event is co-sponsored by Blind Spot in association with Fred & Associates.

Part III TRUTH AND AUTHENTICITY IN PHOTOGRAPHY

How does a photographer negotiate between "documenting" and "creating What is "truth" in photography Other issues to address are the commodification of biography and the viewer/consumer's visceral hunger for vicarious experience and search for authenticity via the artist.

Moderator: Elisabeth Sussman

Panelists: Mitch Epstein, Paul Graham, Katy Grannan, Danny Lyon, and Tod Papageorge

About Mitch Epstein

Mitch Epstein's photographs are in numerous major museum collections, including New York's Metropolitan Museum, Museum of Modern Art and Whitney Museum of American Art, the J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles, and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. His current project, American Power, examines energy usage and the idea of excess in the United States. His recent books include Mitch Epstein: Work and Family Business. Epstein is the recipient of the Berlin Prize in Arts and Letters, Spring 2008, from the American Academy in Berlin. He lives in New York City with his wife and daughter.

About Paul Graham

Paul Graham is a British photographer whose work operates at the point where the documentary and artistic aspects of the medium coalesce. Graham was the first photographer to unite New Color photography with the sensibility of British social documentary, and in so doing he reinvigorated and expanded this area of practice, questioning our notions of what such 'documentary' photography can say, be, or look like. He has published over 10 books, including a Phaidon 'Contemporary Artists' monograph, and his work has been exhibited widely, most notably a one person show at the Tate Gallery, London, and the Venice Biennale. He has just published A Shimmer of Possibility, a 12-volume set of books by Steidl.

About Katy Grannan

Katy Grannan received her BA from the University of Pennsylvania and her MFA from Yale University. She has exhibited at the 2004 Whitney Biennial, The Guggenheim Museum, Bilbao; The Palm Beach Institute of Contemporary Art; Los Angeles County Museum of Art; and The Orange County Museum of Art, among others. Her work is in the collections of The Metropolitan Museum of Art, NY; The Guggenheim Museum, NY; The Whitney Museum of American Art, The Orange County Museum of Art, The Bard College Center for Curatorial Studies, The International Center of Photography, and has been featured in ArtForum, Frieze, Art on Paper, Art and Auction, Visionaire, The Village Voice, The New Yorker, The New York Times, and The New York Times Magazine, among others. Her monograph, Model American was published by Aperture.

About Danny Lyon

Danny Lyon was born in Brooklyn to Russian and German parents and grew up in Queens, NY. He studied history at University of Chicago and is self-taught in photography. He was a member and photographer of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, 1963-64, and the Chicago Outlaw Motorcycle Club, 1965-66. Lyon has been an independent photographer since 1962 and a filmmaker since 1969. He was an associate photographer for Magnum Photos, 1967-75, and a writer and essayist since 1973. He is a self-publisher, with Nancy Lyon since 1980 and Michael Hausman, as Bleak Beauty Books, since 1988. Lyon received a Guggenheim Fellowship in photography, 1969, and in filmmaking, 1979 and a Rockefeller Fellowship in filmmaking. 1990. He was a teacher of non-fiction film at SUNY/Buffalo and at Columbia University, and a photography teacher at Queensborough Community College. His latest book, Like A Thief's Dream, is the non-fiction story of an Arkansas murder. Danny Lyon: Montage, Film, and Still Photography will be on view at the Whitney Museum of American Art until December 2, 2007.

About Tod Papageorge

Tod Papageorge earned his BA in English literature from the University of New Hampshire in 1962, where he began taking photographs during his last semester. He is the recipient of two Guggenheim Fellowships and two National Endowment for the Arts Fellowships. In 1979, Papageorge was named the Walker Evans Professor of Photography at the Yale School of Art, a position he continues to hold today. As the director of the graduate program in photography at the School, he has taught and supervised the course of study of many of the strongest American photographers of the last 30 years. His work has been exhibited internationally, and is included in the collections of more than 30 major museums. In addition, he has written seminal essays on Walker Evans, Robert Frank, Garry Winogrand, and Robert Adams.

About Elisabeth Sussman

Elisabeth Sussman is Curator and Sondra Gilman Curator of Photography at the Whitney Museum of American Art. Her recent exhibition Gordon Matta-Clark: You Are the Measure is currently on tour to the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles followed by the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago. Next for the Whitney, Elisabeth will be co-curating a retrospective exhibition of the work of William Eggleston. She has organized a number of other Whitney exhibitions including Remote Viewing: Invented Worlds in Recent Painting and Drawing (2005); Mike Kelley: Catholic Tastes (1991); Nan Goldin: I'll Be Your Mirror (1996), with David Armstrong; Keith Haring (1997); and the Museum's 1993 Biennial Exhibition. She has recently co-curated two NYC exhibitions on the work of Eva Hesse at The Drawing Center and the Jewish Museum. For the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, Sussman co-organized, with Renate Petzinger of the Museum Wiesbaden, a full retrospective on the work of Eva Hesse which received the International Art Critics Association First Prize for the best monographic exhibition outside of New York in 2001 and 2002. For SFMOMA, Sussman also organized, with Sandra Phillips, a retrospective of the work of Diane Arbus. The catalogue for the Arbus exhibition received the 2004 Infinity Award for Publication of the International Center of Photography. Sussman has been a Fellow of the Rockefeller Foundation in Bellagio, Italy, and at the Getty Research Institute. She is the author of many publications, including Lisette Model and has contributed essays on Robert Gober for the Schaulager and Lee Bontecou for an upcoming exhibition catalogue.

BLIND SPOT: Collapsing Images Part II MONEY, MONEY, MONEY, MONEY

Saturday, November 3, 2007, 4:30 p.m.

Blind Spot is the international source book of photography-based fine art for artists, collectors, creative directors, designers, curators and art lovers. Blind Spot publishes new works by the world's most renowned artists and discovers vital new work by up-and-coming artists. The collaboration of the editors and the ideas expressed by the individual artists make each issue of Blind Spot emerge as a single work of art. Fourteen years old, Blind Spot has gained an international reputation for being a visual magazine that does not talk about imagery the content is imagery.

Collapsing Images Forum

As a counter-point to the visual conversation provided by the magazine, the Collapsing Images Forum aims to give a voice to the issues surrounding photography, and discuss the role of photography in the media and popular culture. Collapsing Images presents three vital discussions led by leading photographers, filmmakers and critics.

Part I A Conversation between Jack Pierson & Jerry Schatzberg (2:00 pm)

Part II Money, Money, Money, Money (4:30 pm)

Part III Truth and Authenticity in Photography (7:30 pm)

This event is co-sponsored by Blind Spot in association with Fred & Associates.

Part II MONEY, MONEY, MONEY, MONEY

In an era when creativity and innovation have a price tag and the lines between art and commerce are increasingly blurred, how do artists negotiate this terrain Are commercial entities like Prada, Apple and Louis Vuitton modern-day Medicis or are these corporations and their consigliere simply bandits brokering on the fame of the artist  Is art in the service of commerce or vice versa?

Moderator: Glenn O'Brien

Panelists: Vince Aletti, Philip Lorca diCorcia, Dennis Freedman, Doug Lloyd, Glen Luchford, Collier Schorr, Andy Spade

About Vince Aletti

Vince Aletti reviews photography exhibitions for the New Yorker's Goings on About Town section and writes a regular column about photography books for Photograph magazine. He contributes features and reviews to Aperture, Art + Auction, Art & Antiques, and Photoworks. He was the art editor of the Village Voice from 1994 to 2005, and the paper's photo critic for 20 years. He is the winner of the International Center of Photography's 2005 Infinity Award in writing.

About Philip Lorca diCorcia

Philip Lorca diCorcia's work is frequently shown in exhibitions addressing our cultural zeitgeist. At the beginning of his career in the late 1970s, diCorcia situated his friends and family within fictional interior tableaus. He later shifted his attention outward, photographing strangers in urban spaces Berlin, Calcutta, Hollywood, New York, Rome, Tokyo and infused the pictures with supplementary lighting to achieve a sense of heightened drama. DiCorcia received his first solo show in 1985 and has had one-person exhibitions worldwide, including those at the Museum of Modern Art (New York), the Centre National de la Photographie (Paris), the Whitechapel Art Gallery (London), the Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofia (Madrid), Art Space Ginza (Tokyo), and the Sprengel Museum (Hanover). In 2001, diCorcia won the Infinity Award for Applied Photography from the International Center for Photography in New York.

About Dennis Freedman

Dennis Freedman is Creative Director of W Magazine. He is responsible for the creative transformation of the magazine, which was relaunched in 1993. In his capacity as Creative Director, Dennis has initiated collaborations with the most influential photographers in the world, including Craig McDean, Bruce Weber, David Sims, Steven Meisel, Steven Klein, Mario Testino, Mario Sorrenti, Mert Atlas and Marcus Piggott, Juergen Teller, Philip Lorca diCorcia, Chuck Close, and Richard Prince. His efforts have earned the publication three National Magazine Awards for Photography. In 2007, Dennis established his own agency, Dennis Freedman Studio. Campaigns that he has worked on include Dolce and Gabbana, Calvin Klein Jeans, and D&G with Steven Klein, Helmut Lang and Celine with Bruce Weber, and a new Coty Fragrance for Marc Jacobs with Juergen Teller.

About Douglas Lloyd

Douglas Lloyd is CEO and creative director of Lloyd (+co), a high-end fashion advertising agency which he founded 11 years ago. His clients include Gucci, Est'e Lauder, Movado, Theory, Club Monaco, Glac au/Vitamin Water, and Oscar de la Renta. Lloyd has also collaborated on several projects with non-profit organizations such as the Whitney Museum of Art, the Dali Lama Foundation, the CFDA, Free Arts Organization, and the Judd Foundation. With a focus on fashion, beauty and fragrance, Lloyd (+ co) and Douglas Lloyd specialize in branding, strategic positioning, advertising, collateral, sales and public relations support, logo development, graphic design, and product consultation. The agency also works in publishing on books and magazines. Design awards won by Lloyd include the New York Type Directors Club, Photo Design, and American Photography, as well as many FIFI awards over the last 10 years.

About Glen Luchford

Glen Luchford's rich and dramatic photo images reveal an intense cinematic style that spans fashion, portraiture and contemporary art. His work for clients including Prada, Yves Saint Laurent, Levis, Mercedes Benz, VW, Sanyo, Parliament, Davidoff and Calvin Klein, has resulted in some of the most memorable campaigns of recent years. His portraits of leading cultural figures including Dennis Hopper, Willem Defoe, Madonna, Bjork and Tilda Swinton, have been commissioned by international publications. His seductive and imaginative fashion editorial work is regularly featured in leading magazines such as Italian, Paris and American Vogue, Harper's Bazaar, Vanity Fair, Another and W. Luchford's fashion photography has been exhibited at The Victoria and Albert Museum, The Photographers Gallery, London, and MoMA Queens as part of Fashioning Fiction (2004). In 2000, Luchford completed a feature length film From Here to Where, which was nominated for the Michael Powell Award at the Edinburgh Festival in 2001.

About Glenn O'Brien

Glenn O'Brien was a student at Columbia University when he landed a job at Andy Warhol's Interview magazine where he became editor and art director. He has run the New York bureau of Rolling Stone, was articles editor of Playboy's alternative skin magazine, Oui, and worked at High Times magazine. In 1976 he formed the band Konelrad--the world's first socialist-realist rock band and in 1978 he launched Glenn O'Brien's TV Party on Manhattan Cable TV's public access channel. In 1981 he wrote and produced the film Downtown 81, starring Jean-Michel Basquiat. In the mid-'80s he began a second career in advertising as a copywriter for Barney's New York and becoming creative director of Barney's Advertising. O'Brien's work appears regularly in GQ, Vanity Fair, Italia, and Paper, among others. His books include The Style Guy, Soapbox (essays), and the poetry collection Human Nature (dub version). He is editor of the literary magazine Bald Ego and has a novel forthcoming.

About Collier Schorr

Collier Schorr was born in New York in 1963. Her work has been exhibited internationally at the Museum of Modern Art, The Whitney Museum of American Art, The Solomon R Guggenheim Museum, Walker Art Center, Institute of Contemporary Art in London, and the Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam, among many others. Schorr's solo exhibition "There I was", at 303 Gallery, New York opened in September 2007 and SteidlMack will publish a book of this work in December 2007. A solo exhibition of Schorr's "Jens F." work will appear at the Museum of Contemporary Art Denver. In 2007 Collier Schorr's "Forest and Fields: Neighbors" was on view at the Badischer Kunstverein Germany, and in 2008 the exhibition will travel to Le Consortium, Dijon, France. SteidlMack published a book of this work in 2006. Schorr was awarded the Guna S Mundheim Fellow, American Academy, Berlin in 2007 and will complete a residency in 2008. Schorr currently lives and works in Brooklyn, New York and is represented by 303 Gallery, NYC and Stuart Shave | Modern Art, London.

About Andy Spade

Andy Spade co-founded Kate Spade with his wife, Kate, in 1993. Prior to pursuing his entrepreneurial ambitions, he spent eleven years in the advertising industry. Andy's experience with some of the world's most recognized brands has helped shape his vision for Kate Spade's future. As CEO/Executive Creative Director, Spade has focused on positioning the company in both the domestic and global marketplaces, developing product lines and managing the brand's direction. Specifically, the ad campaigns have been fundamental to expressing the world of Kate Spade. The fall 2002 campaign, Visiting Tennessee, had the distinction of being included in the Museum of Modern Art's Fashioning Fiction exhibition. In 1999, Andy launched Jack Spade, a collection of accessories for men. In 2001, the Jack Spade line was nominated for the Perry Ellis Award for new accessories talent. Andy lectures at schools such as Harvard, Columbia, Yale, The Rhode Island School of Design, and The Art Center College of Design.

BLIND SPOT: Collapsing Images Part I A CONVERSATION BETWEEN JACK PIERSON & JERRY SCHATZBERG

Saturday, November 3, 2007, 2 p.m.

Blind Spot is the international source book of photography-based fine art for artists, collectors, creative directors, designers, curators and art lovers. Blind Spot publishes new works by the renowned artists and discovers vital new work by up-and-coming artists. Fourteen years old, Blind Spot has gained an international reputation for being a visual magazine that does not talk about imagery?the content is imagery.

Collapsing Images Forum

As a counter-point to the visual conversation provided by the magazine, the Collapsing Images Forum aims to give a voice to the issues surrounding photography, and discuss the role of photography in the media and popular culture. Collapsing Images presents three vital discussions led by leading photographers, filmmakers and critics.

Part I A Conversation between Jack Pierson & Jerry Schatzberg (2:00 pm)

Part II Money, Money, Money, Money (4:30 pm)

Part III Truth and Authenticity in Photography (7:30 pm)

This event is co-sponsored by Blind Spot in association with Fred & Associates.

Part I A CONVERSATION BETWEEN JACK PIERSON & JERRY SCHATZBERG

About Jerry Schatzberg

A creator of poetic images and a compelling storyteller, Jerry Schatzberg has, over the past three decades, excelled in both the realms of photography and filmmaking. Published in Vogue, McCall?s, Esquire, Glamour, and Life in the 1960?s. Schatzberg captured intimate portraits of the generation?s most notable artists, celebrities and thinkers (from Bob Dylan to Robert Rauschenberg), and he pushed on in the 1970s to the medium of film and participated in the renaissance of American cinema, directing films such as: Puzzle of a Downfall Child, The Panic in Needle Park, and Scarecrow. His work marks a time in the history of film when the importance of solid and introspective narrative proved paramount. There are currently two books in production chronicling Jerry Schatzberg?s life and work.

About Jack Pierson

Jack Pierson makes photographs, word sculptures, installations, drawings, and artist's books that explore the emotional undercurrent of everyday life, from the intimacy of romantic attachment to the distant idolizing of others. Using friends as models, Pierson has consistently engaged star culture through his work, whether the stars are from the screen, stage, or art world. Refusing cynicism or irony, Pierson relates to his viewers by seeming to admit his own attraction to the fantasy life depicted in his artworks. He has had recent solo exhibitions at Cheim & Read, NY; Alison Jacques Gallery, London; and Regen Projects, LA. Pierson?s work is in the collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Whitney Museum of American Art, The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, and The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art.

NEWT GINGRICH in conversation with JEFFREY SACHS: A Contract with the Earth

Thursday, November 1, 2007, 7:15 p.m.

Most people regardless of how they categorize themselves politically are weary of the legal and political conflicts that prevent individuals and communities from realizing the benefits of environmental conservation. In his new book, A Contract with the Earth, former Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich and conservationist Terry L. Maple focus the environmental debate on the principle of common commitment. They declare a need for bipartisan environmentalism a new era of environmental stewardship. While acknowledging that liberals and conservatives do not see eye to eye on many issues, they argue that environmental stewardship is a mainstream value that transcends partisan politics.

Their approaches to our environmental challenges are based on three main premises: environmental leadership is integral to America's role in the world, technologically savvy environmental entrepreneurs can and should be the cornerstone of environmental solutions, and cooperation and incentives must be dramatically increased to achieve workable and broadly supported environmental solutions. The foundation of the book a ten-point Contract with the Earth promotes ingenuity over rhetoric as the way forward.

About Newt Gingrich

Newt Gingrich was Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives from 1994 to 1998 and is well-known as the chief architect of the Republican Contract with America. Gingrich has published eleven books. His non-fiction books include: Winning the Future: A 21st Century Contract with America, Lessons Learned the Hard Way, and Saving Lives & Saving Money. He is also the co-author of five fiction books including Never Call Retreat: Lee & Grant, the Final Victory, and his latest book, Pearl Harbor: A Novel of December 8. Since his days as an environmental studies professor, he has been involved in a variety of environmental initiatives. His new book, A Contract with the Earth, is co-authored by Terry L. Maple.

About Jeffrey Sachs

Jeffrey Sachs is the Director of The Earth Institute, Quetelet Professor of Sustainable Development, and Professor of Health Policy and Management at Columbia University. He is also Special Advisor to United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon. From 2002 to 2006, he was Director of the UN Millennium Project and Special Advisor to United Nations Secretary-General Kofi Annan on the Millennium Development Goals, the internationally agreed goals to reduce extreme poverty, disease, and hunger by the year 2015. Sachs is one of the leading voices for combining economic development with environmental sustainability. He is author of hundreds of scholarly articles and many books, including The End of Poverty.

n+1 MAGAZINE: Fright Night, On the Politics of Fear Benjamin Kunkel, Meghan Falvey, Alex Gourevitch, Mark Greif & Chad Harbach

Tuesday, October 30, 2007, 7 p.m.

Fear of terrorism was the chief political asset of the Bush administration during its heyday. Now that the Democratic party and environmentalism are in the ascendant, is a right wing politics of fear being succeeded by a left-liberal politics of fear? Can progressive politics appeal to our hopes and desires rather than our nightmares? Or are the threats we face?including global warming and energy scarcity so ominous that a politics of fear is the only credible kind left?

One of the founders of n+1 magazine, Benjamin Kunkel, will moderate as the founder contributors to the sixth issue of n+1 magazine, Meghan Falvey, Alex Gourevitch, Mark Greif, and Chad Harbach, weigh in.

About Meghan Falvey

Meghan Falvey is a graduate student in sociology at New York University. She is working on a book about the contemporary culture of work and love.

About Alex Gourevitch

Alex Gourevitch is a doctoral candidate in political science at Columbia University. He is co-editor of Politics without Sovereignty: A Critique of Contemporary International Relations.

About Mark Greif

Mark Greif is co-editor of n+1 magazine.

About Chad Harbach

Chad Harbach is managing editor of n+1 magazine. He is at work on a novel, as well as a series of essays about ecology.

About Benjamin Kunkel

Benjamin Kunkel is one of the founders of n+1 magazine. He is the author of the novel Indecision which received awards for the best first novel of 2006 in both France and Italy. His literary criticism has appeared in Dissent, Harper's, The London Review of Books, The New Yorker, and The New York Review of Books. He is at work on a play.

MAIRA KALMAN in conversation with Paul Holdengräber: The Principles of Uncertainty with music by Nico Muhly

Tuesday, October 23, 2007, 7 p.m.

Celebrating the publication of The Principles of Uncertainty, is an irresistible invitation to experience life through the psyche of Maira Kalman. Her book, a compilation of her illustrated New York Times columns, is part personal narrative, part documentary, part travelogue, and part chapbook where she paints her inimitable combination of image and text. Her whimsical paintings, ideas, and images?which initially appear random?ultimately form an intricately interconnected worldview, an idiosyncratic inner monologue. Kalman contends with some existential questions?What is identity? What is happiness? Why do we fight wars? And then, of course, death, love, and candy (not necessarily in that order).

The evening consists of gathering, ping pong, a conversation between Maira Kalman and Paul Holdengräber about life, love, yearnings, confusion with some visuals from the book Principles of Uncertainty. Julie Saul will be nearby. Small amount of questions. THEN the music. The questions from Principles of Uncertainty will be performed. Composition by Nico Muhly. Then all are invited for a refreshment involving Mocha Creme Cake.

Julie Saul owns the Julie Saul Gallery at 535 West 22nd Street where the paintings from Maira Kalman's book are now being exhibited.

A Note on the music: ?I wrote three sad songs filled with questions. Maybe later we will get some answers and then there will be more singing. But until then there are just these three songs and little interludes.? Nico Muhly

Caleb Burhans, countertenor & violin

Sam Amidon, banjo, voice

Brian Snow, cello

Nico Muhly, piano

About Maira Kalman

Maira Kalman is an illustrator, author, and designer. Most recently, she illustrated a new edition of Strunk and White's The Elements of Style. She has created many covers for The New Yorker, including the famous map of Newyorkistan (created with Rick Meyerowitz). Ms. Kalman's twelve children's books include Max Makes a Million, Stay Up Late, Swami on Rye, and What Pete Ate. She also has designed fabric for Isaac Mizrahi, accessories for Kate Spade, sets for the Mark Morris Dance Company, and, with her late husband Tibor Kalman under the M&Co. label, clocks, umbrellas, and other accessories for the Museum of Modern Art. Ms. Kalman's work is shown at the Julie Saul Gallery in Manhattan.

In her own words: "born. bucolic childhood. culture-stuffed adolescence. played piano. stopped. danced. stopped. wrote. discarded writing. drew. reinstated writing. married Tibor Kalman and collaborated at iconoclastic yet successful design studio. wrote and painted children's books. worried. took up Ping-Pong. relaxed. wrote and painted for many magazines. cofounded the Rubber Band Society. amused. children: two. dog: one."

About Nico Muhly

Nico Muhly attended Columbia University and the Juilliard School, where he studied composition under Christopher Rouse and John Corigliano. Muhly's works have been premiered by the American Symphony Orchestra, the Juilliard Orchestra, the Boston University Tanglewood Institute Orchestra, the Boston Pops, Clare College Choir, and New York's Saint Thomas Church Choir, among others. In 2005, with designer/illustrator Maira Kalman, he created a song cycle on Strunk & White's The Elements of Style that premiered at LIVE from the NYPL. He did film scores for Choking Man (2006) and Joshua (2007), and he has worked extensively with Philip Glass for numerous film and stage projects. He has also lent his skills as performer, arranger and conductor to such musicians as Bj?rk and Antony of Antony and the Johnsons. Speaks Volumes (2007), a disc of Muhly's chamber music with electronics, brought invitations for concerts at both Carnegie's Zankel Hall and the Whitney Museum. He lives in New York City.

About Paul Holdengräber

Paul Holdengräber is the Director of Public Programs?now known as "LIVE from the NYPL"?for The Research Libraries of The New York Public Library.

RICHARD PEVEAR & LARISSA VOLOKHONSKY in conversation with Keith Gessen: Celebrating a New Translation of War and Peace

Thursday, October 18, 2007, 7 p.m.

After their translation of Tolstoi's Anna Karenina, comes this new translation of War and Peace. Together, Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky have translated The Collected Tales by Nikolai Gogol, The Complete Short Novels of Chekhov, and The Brothers Karamazov along with many other works by Fyodor Dostoevsky.

About Richard Pevear

Richard Pevear has published translations of Alain, Yves Bonnefoy, Alberto Savinio, Pavel Florensky, and Henri Volohonsky, as well as two books of poetry. He has received fellowships or grants for translation from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Ingram Merrill Foundation, the Guggenheim Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the French Ministry of Culture.

About Larissa Volokhonsky

Larissa Volokhonsky was born in Leningrad. She has translated works by the prominent Orthodox theologians Alexander Schmemann and John Meyendorff into Russian.

Together, Pevear and Volokhonsky have translated Dead Souls and The Collected Tales by Nikolai Gogol, The Complete Short Novels of Chekhov, and The Brothers Karamazov, Crime and Punishment, Notes from Underground, Demons, The Idiot, and The Adolescent by Fyodor Dostoevsky. They were twice awarded the PEN Book-of-the-Month Club Translation Prize for their version of Dostoevsky's The Brothers Karamazov and for Tolstoy's Anna Karenina, and their translation of Dostoevsky's Demons was one of three nominees for the same prize. They are married and live in France.

About Keith Gessen

Keith Gessen is a fiction writer, critic, and translator. His translation of Voices from Chernobyl won the National Book Critics Circle Award for Nonfiction in 2005. His translation of Lyudmila Petrushevskaya's scary fairy tales will be published in early 2009. He has written about Russian literature and culture for the New Yorker and the New York Review of Books. He is also one of the founding editors of the literary magazine n+1.

OUT OF FASHION: THE ABSENCE OF COLOR Bethann Hardison in conversation with Lori Goldstein, David Ralph, Tracy Reese & James Scully

Monday, October 15, 2007, 7 p.m.

Why have images of black models been in sharp decline in high fashion for more than a decade?

Some of the fashion industry's most prominent voices Pulitzer Prize winner Robin Givhan, super model Naomi Campbell, and Cathy Horyn of the New York Times to name a few have stated that models of color have been especially absent on the runway as well as editorially. This open forum with the fashion glitterati in the audience and on stage will investigate why and discuss what can be done to make positive change.

Former fashion model and model agency owner, Bethann Hardison will lead a discussion on the lack of the black image in fashion today with stylist Lori Goldstein, model agent David Ralph, fashion designer Tracy Reese, and casting agent James Scully. After revealing how they each personally fit into the fashion puzzle, the group will explore the issues and complex layers (who is really at fault? The designer? The agent? The photographer? The stylist? The magazine editor?) and consider solutions to the problem (consumer action, the fashion industry acknowledging its social responsibility, etc.). After a brief discussion, the audience will join an open forum of questions and comments.

About Bethann Hardison

Bethann Hardison began her international modeling career with Willi Smith, and went on to work with Anne Klein, Oscar de la Renta, Calvin Klein, Perris Ellis, Issey Miyake, and Ungaro. Since her modeling days she has worked at Stephen Burrows, Valentino Couture, and Click Model Management before forming Bethann Management. In 1995, Bethann recreated the concept of the male supermodel and made fashion history by signing her client, Tyson Beckford, to an exclusive contract with designer Ralph Lauren. It was the first contract of its kind ever to be given to an African-American male model. In 1996 she ended her representation of fashion models and became co-executive producer of Between Brothers for Fox Network and more recently, co-executive producer of the syndicated television show Livin? Large. Bethann Hardison currently maintains management for Tyson Beckford, Kadeem Hardison, and Naomi Campbell and is developing a documentary on the Black fashion model.

About Lori Goldstein

For over twenty years Lori Goldstein has collaborated with Annie Leibovitz as principal photographer for Vanity Fair and, since the early 1990s, with Steven Meisel for Italian Vogue. Goldstein has held the position of Contributing Editor at Italian Vogue and Allure, acted as creative-consultant on wardrobe selection for Madonna, Cameron Diaz, and Demi Moore, and has been a creative consultant with fashion designers including Donatella Versace, Calvin Klein, Narciso Rodriguez, and TSE.

About Tracy Reese

In the nearly ten years since the debut of Tracy Reese, the label has come to epitomize feminine chic. Tracy has since ventured into home design, accessories and opened her first Flagship Boutique in Manhattan?s Meatpacking District in Spring 2006. Tracy Reese and her second label, plenty by Tracy Reese, are sold nationwide to Neiman Marcus, Nordstrom, Saks Fifth Avenue, Bergdorf Goodman, Anthropologie, and Scoop, among others.

About James Scully

James Scully is a renowned fashion show casting agent responsible for discovering many of the iconic models who helped mold the image of Gucci during the stellar Tom Ford years. He worked with Tom Ford for ten years before moving on to work for Harper's Bazaar as a model editor. He is now a casting agent once again.

THE MOTH: —Stories about Loss Melissa Bank, Bliss Broyard, Ophira Eisenberg, Jeffrey Rudell & Josh Swiller Paul Holdengräber, host

Friday, October 12, 2007, 7:30 p.m.

Stories About Loss

"We lose therefore we are."

Humans lose their keys, limbs, minds, pets, political campains, objects of desire, hair, body fat, competitive advantages, cell phones, loved ones, temper, sense of purpose, and, in the end, their lives.

Join The Moth, New York?s premier storytelling organization as it returns for a LIVE from the NYPL evening to explore both heartbreaking and hilarious instances of this fundamental human experience.

6:30 pm Doors Open

7:30 pm Stories Start on Stage

Co-presented by the MOTH

Hosted by: Paul Holdengräber

Curated by: Meg Bowles

Featuring stories by:

Melissa Bank

Bliss Broyard

Ophira Eisenberg

Jefferey Rudell

Josh Swiller

and others!

Cellist: Catherine Bent

Artistic Director: Catherine Burns

Senior Producer: Sarah Austin Jenness

Curator and Producer: Jenifer Hixson

Program Manager: Marianne Gadeberg

Executive and Creative Director: Lea Thau

About the Storytellers:

About Melissa Bank

Melissa Bank is the author of The Wonder Spot and the best selling first-time short fiction collection, The Girl?s Guides to Hunting and Fishing. She was the winner of the 1993 Nelson Algren Award for short fiction and she has published stories in Zoetrope, The Chicago Tribune, The North American Review, Other Voices, and Ascent. Her work has been heard on "Selected Shorts" on National Public Radio and she is at work on a novel as well as a screenplay for The Girls' Guide. Bank holds an MFA from Cornell University, and lives in New York City.

About Bliss Broyard

Bliss Broyard is the author of the critically acclaimed family memoir One Drop My Father's Hidden Life--A Story of Race & Family Secrets, which was just released in September. Her fiction and essays have been anthologized in Best American Short Stories, The Pushcart Prize Anthology and The Art of the Essay, and have appeared in Grand Street, Ploughshares, "O" Magazine, and Cookie. She is a frequent contributor to Elle Magazine and The New York Times Book Review. Bliss lives in Brooklyn, New York, with her husband and daughter.

About Ophira Eisenberg

Ophira Eisenberg is a stand-up comic and has appeared on Comedy Central's Premium Blend and Fresh Faces of Comedy, VH-1's Best Week Ever and All Access, E! Channel's Top 100 Countdown and Discovery Channel's Lost Treasures of the Deep. Selected by Backstage as one of "10 Standout Stand-ups Worth Watching" in their Spotlight on Comedy issue, Ophira performs regularly at enowned comedy clubs across the country. She is the co-host and co-producer of the acclaimed weekly show Sweet Paprika (a Time Out New York Critic's Pick for comedy) at the D-Lounge in Union Square. Her writing is featured alongside that of Jerry Seinfeld, Chris Rock and Joan Rivers in the new Crown/Random House anthology I Killed: True Stories of the Road from America's Top Comics. She is also a regular comtributor for Us Weekly's Fashion Police.

About Jeffery Rudell

Jeffery Rudell is a graphic designer, writer and one of the founders of Hearsay; a storytelling workshop. He has won The Moth's Story Slam Championship (2003) and was recently featured on the National Storytelling Tour (2007). His work can be heard on The Moth CD's Audience Favorites Vol. I and Love Hurts. He lives in New York City with his partner Albert and dreams of finding a writing gig that will help pay his mortgage.
 

About Josh Swiller

Josh Swiller is the author of The Unheard: A Memoir of Deafness and Africa. He was born with moderate hearing loss and was deaf by age four. A graduate of Yale University, Swiller has had a wide variety of careers; forest ranger, carpenter, slipper salesman, raw food chef, Zen noviate, journalist, and teacher among other things. In August 2005, he had successful surgery for a cochlear implant and partially recovered his hearing. He now speaks often on issues facing mainstreamed deaf individuals, and currently works at a hospice in Brooklyn, New York.
 

About Paul Holdengräber (Host)

Paul Holdengräber is the Director of Public Programs now known as "LIVE from the NYPL" for The Research Libraries of The New York Public Library.
 

About Catherine Bent (Cellist)

Catherine Bent was born in England and has lived and worked and played in New York City for 15 years. As leader of the AXIS String Quartet, she has collaborated with jazz musicians Lee Konitz, Michael Hashim, and Rob Thomas among others. She has also put her talents to use in Cirque du Soleil?s Quidam, Dafnis Prieto's Absolute Quintet, Greg Osby?s Double Quartet, Palm Beach Opera, One World Symphony, John Cage's Ocean with Merce Cunningham, and Happy Hour Clowns? 9-minute Nutcracker at Dance Theater Workshop. Last week she appeared on SNL with Kanye West, in whose band she regularly plays. Currently, Catherine is pursuing a Masters in Jazz Performance at New England Conservatory.

About The MOTH

The Moth, a New York based non-profit arts organization dedicated to the art of storytelling, has been called New York's hottest and hippest literary ticket by The Wall Street Journal. The Moth features simple, old-fashioned storytelling on thoroughly modern themes by wildly divergent raconteurs. Past storytellers at The Moth have included Malcolm Gladwell, Ethan Hawke, Erica Jong, Frank McCourt, Moby, and George Plimpton as well as a VooDoo Priestess, an astronaut and hundreds more. In addition to its main stage, The Moth conducts six other programs including?The Moth StorySLAM, a competitive storytelling event, and The Moth Outreach Program, which conducts workshops for underserved teens and adults in rehabilitation programs and The Moth Story Tour which began in Los Angeles during 2006. The Moth has brought more than 2,000 live stories to over 60,000 audience members. www.themoth.org

JAMES GEARY Juggles Aphorisms Flash Rosenberg performs Quote Repair

Tuesday, October 9, 2007, 7 p.m.

How can aphorisms change your life?

Find out when James Geary brings his juggling aphorism show yes real live juggling of words and balls to LIVE from the NYPL. Geary  whose new book is Geary's Guide to the World's Great Aphorists has been obsessed by aphorisms since he was eight years old. For almost 40 years, he's been collecting them, writing about them, and even translating them. The result is Geary's Guide, the most comprehensive encyclopedia of aphorisms ever written.

Geary will present a mix of memoir, literary history, audience participation?live juggling, with words and balls. Audience members are invited to randomly pick an aphorism from a globe and read it aloud; Geary then tells about that aphorism and the person who wrote it, weaving in personal and historical anecdote. Geary's authors range from Aristotle and Muhammad Ali to Mae West and the Zen masters, and some 350 aphorists in between, from the beginnings of the aphorism in ancient Egypt and China right up to the present day. There are also several blank strips of paper in the globe. If an audience member draws one of these, they can name any theme and Geary must cite a related aphorism on the spot. If he fails, they get a free copy of the book!

"Quote Repair"

Do your proverbs need pruning?

Upon entering, LIVE audience members are invited to contribute their favorite quotations for "A Drawing for a Drawing" by LIVE artist-in-residence Flash Rosenberg. Selected quotations will be drawn onstage as part of a performed drawing/talk warm-up offering tips for Quote Repair.

About James Geary

James Geary is the author of The World in a Phrase: A Brief History of the Aphorism which has been translated into Italian, Korean, Portuguese and Spanish. Geary is editor-at-large with Ode and writes for Popular Science, Salon, and The Huffington Post. He is the former Europe editor for Time and author of The Body Electric: An Anatomy of the New Bionic Senses. His latest book is Geary's Guide to the World's Great Aphorists

About Flash Rosenberg

Flash Rosenberg uses photos, drawings, writings, and performances to deliver pith, humor, and memories. Her public art mischief has aired daily on public radio and her work has appeared in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The New York Daily News, the Forward, The Funny Times and Lilith. She is a freelance photographer and currently Artist-in-Residence for LIVE from the NYPL. For the past four seasons, Flash Rosenberg has made a drawing of each LIVE conversation. A drawing of the evening along with drawings from past LIVE conversations will be on display.

KEN BURNS in conversation with Robert Stone: The War

Thursday, September 27, 2007, 7 p.m.

Ken Burns' most recent documentary film project, The War, tells the story of the Second World War through the personal accounts of more than 40 men and women from four quintessentially American towns Waterbury, Connecticut; Mobile, Alabama; Sacramento, California; and Luverne, Minnesota who experienced and helped to win the most extraordinary war in history. Woven largely from their memories, the narrative unfolds as the war unfolded month by bloody month, with the outcome always in doubt. The film series explores the most intimate human dimensions of a worldwide catastrophe that touched the lives of every family on every street in every town in America demonstrating that in extraordinary times, there are no ordinary lives.

From Pearl Harbor to the liberation of the concentration camps, the companion book to this fall 2007 PBS series, The War: An Intimate History, 1941-1945 by Geoffrey C. Ward and Ken Burns, includes all the iconic events as well as those of prisoners of war and Japanese American internees, defense workers and schoolchildren, and those who struggled simply to keep families together while their men were shipped off.

About Ken Burns

Ken Burns has been making films for more than thirty years. In 1981, Burns produced and directed his first film for PBS, the Academy Award nominated Brooklyn Bridge. His other films include Huey Long; Thomas Hart Benton; Empire of the Air: The Men Who Made Radio; a trilogy including The Civil War, Baseball, and Jazz; Frank Lloyd Wright; Not For Ourselves Alone: The Story of Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony; Mark Twain; and Unforgivable Blackness: The Rise and Fall of Jack Johnson. Burns is currently producing and directing a six-part film series on the history of the National Parks which will air on PBS in 2009. He is also working on a history of Prohibition and an update to his 1994 epic Baseball. His current film which premieres in September on PBS is The War with a companion book co-authored with Geoffrey C. Ward entitled The War: An Intimate History, 1941-1945.

About Robert Stone

Robert Stone was born in Brooklyn, New York in 1937. He is the author of several critically acclaimed novels and collections, including National Book Award Winner Dog Soldiers and Pulitzer Prize Finalist Bear and His Daughter. His most recent book is Bay of Souls.

NAOMI KLEIN in conversation with Roger D. Hodge: The Shock Doctrine, The Rise of Disaster Capitalism

Monday, September 24, 2007, 7 p.m.

Three years ago, in a ground-breaking report for Harper's Magazine, Naomi Klein authored one of the definitive early statements of what precisely the Bush Administration hoped to accomplish in Iraq. The agenda, she wrote, was nothing less than the creation of "a gleaming showroom for laissez-faire economics, a utopia such as the world had never seen." Klein showed how the "shock and awe" of the invasion soon gave way to a version of economic shock therapy so severe that it helped spawn the guerrilla insurgency that continues today. Since that time, Klein has continued to report from war and disaster zones, from the Asian tsunami to Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans. Along the way, Klein realized that a new economic sector was coming into being?she calls it "disaster capitalism"?the hallmark of which is the seizure of public assets for private profit, combined with the privatization of the response to the disaster itself.

Tracing the intellectual origins of disaster capitalism back fifty years to the doctrines of University of Chicago economist Milton Friedman, her new book The Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism, exposes a cycle of mutually reinforcing "shock therapies," drawing new and surprising connections between economic policy, "shock and awe" warfare, and covert CIA-funded experiments in electroshock and sensory deprivation in the 1950s, research that informs the torture manuals used today in Guant?namo Bay. Klein shows how the same techniques used to "soften up" and "break" prisoners are being used to reengineer entire societies. Her new essay, "Disaster Capitalism: The New Economy of Catastrophe," appears in the October issue of Harper's Magazine.

The Shock Doctrine is Naomi Klein's unofficial story of how the "free market" came to dominate the world, from Chile to Russia, China to Iraq, South Africa to Canada. Her new book explodes the myth that the global free market triumphed democratically, and that unfettered capitalism goes hand in hand with democracy. Roger Hodge, a connoisseur of human wickedness, admires Klein's argument but wonders whether the logic of the new disaster economy, as compellingly frightening as it is, might not be an expression of something far older, and possibly more insidious, than capitalism.

This event is co-sponsored by:

About Naomi Klein

Naomi Klein is a journalist, syndicated columnist, and author of No Logo: Taking Aim at the Brand Bullies, which has been translated into twenty-eight languages. Klein writes a regular column for The Nation and The Guardian that is syndicated internationally by the New York Times Syndicate. A collection of her work, Fences and Windows: Dispatches from the Front Lines of the Globalization Debate, was published in 2002. In 2004, she released The Take, a feature documentary about Argentina?s occupied factories, co-produced with director Avi Lewis. The film was an official selection of the Venice Biennale and won the Best Documentary Jury Prize at the American Film Institute Film Festival in Los Angeles. Klein?s forthcoming book, The Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism, will soon be published worldwide. 

About Roger D. Hodge

Roger D. Hodge is the editor of Harper?s Magazine. He commissioned and edited Klein's 2004 essay, "Baghdad Year Zero: Pillaging Iraq in Pursuit of a Neocon Utopia," as well as her October 2007 cover story for Harper's, "Disaster Capitalism: The New Economy of Catastrophe."

Opening Night! ORHAN PAMUK in conversation with Paul Holdengräber

Wednesday, September 19, 2007, 7 p.m.

Turkish writer Orhan Pamuk?by turns witty, moving, and provocative?presents his criticism, autobiographical writing, and meditations alongside interviews and selections from his private notebooks in his new book, Other Colors. Written over the last three decades on his lifelong obsessions, on his own books and writing process, and on the work of others, he engages the work of such novelists as Laurence Sterne and Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Salman Rushdie and Patricia Highsmith. We learn not only how he writes but also how he lives as he recounts his successful struggle to quit smoking and describes his relationship with his daughter. Ordinary events?applying for a passport, the death of a relative?inspire extraordinary flights of association as Pamuk reflects on everything from the child?s state of being to romantic versus parental love to divergent attitudes toward art in the East and West.

About Orhan Pamuk

Born in Istanbul, Orhan Pamuk is the winner of the Nobel Prize for Literature for 2006. At the age of 23 Pamuk decided to become a novelist, and giving up everything else retreated into his flat and began to write. He has been writing for over 30 years and his works include Cevdet Bey and His Sons, The Silent House, The White Castle, The Black Book, The New Life, and the autobiographical book, Istanbul. From the mid-1990s Pamuk took a critical stance towards the Turkish state in articles about human rights and freedom of thought, although he took little interest in politics. Snow, which he describes as 'my first and last political novel,' was published in 2002. His novel My Name Is Red won the 2003 IMPAC Dublin Literary Award. His work has been translated into more than twenty languages. Apart from three years in New York, Orhan Pamuk has spent all his life in the same streets and district of Istanbul, and he now lives in the building where he was raised. Other Colors: Essays and a Story is Pamuk?s first book since winning the Nobel Prize. In 2006 Orhan Pamuk became a Library Lion, the highest honor awarded by The New York Public Library.

About Paul Holdengräber

Paul Holdengräber is the Director of Public Programs?now known as "LIVE from the NYPL"?for The Research Libraries of The New York Public Library.

The 20th Century on Trial GÜNTER GRASS & NORMAN MAILER Interviewed by and in Conversation with Andrew O'Hagan

Wednesday, June 27, 2007, 7 p.m.

7:15pm Günter Grass interviewed by Andrew O'Hagan

8:00pm Norman Mailer interviewed by Andrew O'Hagan

8:45 - 9:15pm Günter Grass & Norman Mailer in conversation with Andrew O'Hagan

I always thought violence was one of the frontiers left to us as novelists. The great novelists of the nineteenth century dealt with love, they dealt with disappointment and love, they dealt with honesty, they dealt to some degree with corruption, they dealt with the forces of society as general abstract forces that could bend a person's will. Then came the twentieth century."

Norman Mailer, The Paris Review, Summer 2007

"Auschwitz was not a manifestation of common human bestiality; it was a repeatable consequence of a network of responsibilities so organised and so subdivided that the individual was conscious of no responsibility at all. The action of every individual who participated or did not participate in the crime was determined, knowingly or unknowingly, by a narrow conception of duty."

Günter Grass, What Shall We Tell Our Children?

Born in the 1920s, Günter Grass and Norman Mailer went on to become grand men of letters. They witnessed the 20th century at close quarters. At the center of each writer's consciousness is the role of their respective countries in World War II and the legacy of violence and guilt that created the Cold War. Yet as stylists these two novelists appeared to internalize the great forces of their times: the appeal of totalitarianism and the cult of celebrity, the struggle for national definition and the psychology of sex.

Mailer and Grass set out to create revolutions in the consciousness of their times, and now might be the moment to ask how the 20th century itself emerges from their work. What was that century? What would they write for its epitaph? Nobel Prize-Winner Günter Grass's memoir Peeling the Onion takes him back to his wartime childhood and adolescence it is a searing book that provides evidence on behalf of the self-accusing. Norman Mailer's latest novel, The Castle in the Forest, is his take on Hitler's own youth. These two great writers have come full circle, to the same place and time, and their creativity puts the 20th century itself on trial.

This event is co-sponsored by:

About Günter Grass
Günter Grass was born in 1927 in Danzig-Langfuhr of Polish-German parents. After military service and captivity by American forces 1945-46, he worked as a miner and stonecutter and studied art. His first poetry was published in 1956 and his major international breakthrough came in 1959 with his novel The Tin Drum, an allegorical account of German reality during the first half of this century, which, with Cat and Mouse and Dog Years, was to form what is called the Danzig Trilogy. In the 1960s Grass became active in politics, participating in election campaigns on behalf of the Social Democrat party and Willy Brandt. This was the start of his lifelong fight for peace and against all kinds of ideologies. He won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1999. His latest book, Peeling the Onion, has just been published in English.  

About Norman Mailer

Norman Mailer was born in Long Branch, New Jersey in 1923. He published his first story at Harvard when he was 18. Mailer was drafted into the Army in World War II and served in the South Pacific. In 1948, he published a book that made him world-famous: The Naked and the Dead, based on his personal experiences during World War II. It was hailed by many as one of the best American novels to come out of the war years and named one of the "100 best novels in English language" by the Modern Library. He has since published over 30 books and has twice won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. He has been President of American PEN and his his most recent novel is The Castle in the Forest.

About Andrew O'Hagan

Andrew O'Hagan was born in Glasgow, Scotland in 1968. He is a contributing editor to the London Review of Books and a contributor to the New York Review. He won the E.M. Forster Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, and was named one of Granta's Best of Young British Novelists. His new novel is Be Near Me.

MAGNUM @ 60

Saturday, June 16, 2007, 7 p.m.

In celebration of the 60th anniversary of Magnum Photos, Live from the NYPL and Magnum Festival '07 bring together a night of conversation with Philip Jones Griffiths, Keith Beauchamp, Susan Meiselas, Gilles Peress, and Larry Towell. Fred Ritchin will moderate.

With the advent of technologies that promote the proliferation of media content, the sheer number of images available has thrown the nature of photojournalism, and even the power of photography itself, into a new light. In addition, the boundaries of what constitutes ?truth? and ?veracity? are constantly being blurred. In light of the increasing diffusion of the media, along with the rise of media conglomerates, it is pertinent to question the responsibility of today's media as well as to discern with whom that responsibility lies.

  • Now that Internet blogs such as YouTube have emerged as a leading form of news transmission and a large population of the world owns digital cameras, how does this democracy change the role of the journalist?
  • What role does the ?citizen journalist? play?
  • Does this undermine traditional journalism or empower it?
  • Does traditional journalism have a place in the future?
  • Will digital journalism ever be accepted as a major documentary/art form?
  • What happens to the idea of responsibility in the world of easy, quick and cheap photo-making?
  • Do photographers still have a responsibility to their subjects? To their audience? And how are they held accountable?
  • How will the Magnum ethos be affected by this brave new world of image making?

About MAGNUM

In 1947, four young photographers - Henri Cartier-Bresson, Robert Capa, David Seymour, George Rodger founded Magnum Photos two years after witnessing the atrocities committed against humanity during World War II. In forming a co-operative, these men were bound by a common goal of telling the world's stories with uncompromising responsibility to authorship. They sought to break free of editorial constraints and challenged the prevailing idea that a magazine or newspaper could own their images. Thus, the Magnum ethos, which still guides the agency and its photographers, sought editorial freedom and ownership of copyrights.

This event is co-presented by Magnum Festival '07

About Keith Beauchamp

Keith Beauchamp has devoted the past eleven years pursuing justice for Emmett Till. On May 10th, 2004, the U.S. Department of Justice re-opened the nearly half-century old murder case citing Beauchamp's documentary The Untold Story of Emmett Louis Till as both a major factor in their decision and the starting point for their investigation. Beauchamp has been featured on 60 Minutes, ABC World News Tonight Person of the Week, Court TV, MSNBC, CNN, BBC as well as the New York Times, Washington Post, USA Today, and The Chicago Tribune. Beauchamp is producing a feature film with Frederick Zollo (Mississippi Burning) based on his eleven year journey in connection with the Emmett Till case.

About Philip Jones Griffiths

Philip Jones Griffiths became a member of Magnum in 1971. Born in Wales, Griffiths began photographing for the Manchester Guardian and the London-based Observer. He covered the Algerian War, Central Africa and Asia, photographing in Vietnam from 1966 to 1968. His book, Vietnam Inc., is one of the most detailed surveys of any conflict with commentaries which are both matter-of-fact and darkly ironic. In 1980, Griffiths assumed the presidency of Magnum, a post which he held for five years. Griffiths' photographs have appeared in most of the world's major magazines and his assignments have taken him to over 120 countries. He continues to work for Life and G?o on stories such as Buddhism in Cambodia, droughts in India, poverty in Texas, the re-greening of Vietnam, and the legacy of the first Gulf war in Kuwait.

About Susan Meiselas

Susan Meiselas became a member of Magnum in 1980. She is best known for her coverage of the insurrection in Nicaragua and for her documentation of human rights issues in Latin America, which were published widely throughout the world. Meiselas has had solo exhibitions in Paris, Madrid, Amsterdam, London, Los Angeles, Chicago and New York and her work is included in major American and international collections. She has received awards including the Robert Capa Gold Medal for outstanding courage and reporting for her work in Nicaragua; the Maria Moors Cabot Prize from Columbia University for her coverage of Latin America; and, in 2005, the Cornell Capa Infinity Award. In 1992, she was named a MacArthur Fellow.
 

About Gilles Peress

Gilles Peress was born on December 29, 1946, in France. He studied at the Institut d?Etudes Politiques and at the Universite de Vincennes. Gilles Peress started using photography to create museum installations and books in 1971. His books include Haines (2004); A Village Destroyed (2002); The Graves: Srebrenica and Vukovar (1998); The Silence: Rwanda (1995); Farewell to Bosnia (1994); and Telex Iran (1984, 1997 reprint). His work has been exhibited and is collected by: The Museum of Modern Art, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, the International Center of Photography, PS1, all in New York; the Art Institute of Chicago; the Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, DC; the George Eastman House; the Minneapolis Institute of Arts; the Walker Art Center; the V & A; the Mus?e d?Art Moderne, Parc de la Villette and Centre Georges Pompidou; Museum Folkwang, Essen; Sprengel Museum, Hannover, and the Nederlands Foto Instituut, among others. Among the awards and fellowships he has received are: Guggenheim Fellowship, National Endowment for the Arts (1992,1984,1979), Pollack-Krasner (2002), and New York State Council of the Arts (2002) fellowships, the W. Eugene Smith Grant for Humanistic Photography, the Gahan Fellowship at Harvard University, the International Center of Photography Infinity Award (2002, 1996, 1994), the Erich Solomon Prize, and the Alfred Eisenstaedt Award (2000, 1999, 1998). Portfolios of his work have appeared on numerous occasions in The New York Times Magazine, The London Sunday Times Magazine, Du Magazine, Life, Stern, Geo, Paris Match, Parkett, Aperture, Doubletake, The New Yorker and The Paris Review. Peress joined Magnum Photos in 1972 and served three times as Vice President and two times as President of the cooperative. He and his wife, Alison Cornyn, live in Brooklyn with their three children.

About Fred Ritchin

Fred Ritchin wrote the history of Magnum Photos for its fortieth anniversary, published in In Our Time: The World as Seen by Magnum Photographers. Ritchin is Associate Chair of the Department of Photography & Imaging at New York University, and director of PixelPress, an organization utilizing new media and documentary in collaboration with human rights organizations. Previously he was picture editor of The New York Times Magazine and executive editor of Camera Arts magazine. Ritchin was also founding director of the Photojournalism and Documentary Photography Program at the International Center of Photography. His new book, After Photography, reflecting on the emergence of media in a digital environment, will be published in Spring 2008.
 

About Larry Towell

Larry Towell became a member of Magnum in 1993. A fascination with landlessness led him to the Mennonite migrant workers of Mexico, an eleven-year project completed in 2000. He has pursued similar, lengthy long-term reportage work in El Salvador, and Palestine. Towell's awards are numerous, and with the help of the inaugural Henri Cartier-Bresson Award, he finished a second highly acclaimed book on the Palestinian-Israeli conflict in 2005, No Man's Land. Other books include The Mennonites, El Salvador, and In the Wake of Katrina. He has been published in major international magazines including The New York Times, Life, Stern, Geo, Elle, Esquire, Rolling Stone, Libération, and The Sunday Times.

MIRANDA JULY & Friends: David Byrne & Becky Stark No One Belongs Here More Than You

Friday, May 25, 2007, 7 p.m.

A night in which Miranda July and her friends Becky Stark and David Byrne gather together to create a feeling of belonging. Miranda will read stories, Becky will sing songs, and David will ask Miranda questions. In moments the audience may also be asked to sing or read or ask questions of Miranda or of themselves. One thing is for certain, Miranda will not sing.

Both Miranda July's collection of short stories, No One Belongs Here More Than You and Becky Stark's album with her band Lavender Diamond, Imagine Our Love, have just been published and released. Both these works were enjoyed by David Byrne, who has released many albums and published many books, most recently, Arboretum.

About David Byrne

David Byrne co-founded the band Talking Heads. In addition Byrne has collaborated with Robert Wilson (The Knee Plays, The Forest), Jonathan Demme (Stop Making Sense), Bertolucci (The Last Emperor), 15 of the best Latin musicians in New York (Rei Mom), and most recently he performed Here Lies Love, a project about Imelda Marcos with musical contributions from Fatboy Slim, at Carnegie Hall. David Byrne has been publishing and exhibiting his photography and design work for the past decade. Like his film and musical projects, his artwork is often described as elevating the mundane or the banal to the level of art, creating icons out of everyday materials to find the sacred in the profane. Byrne has mixed exhibitions with public art: from billboards in Belfast and Toronto and subway posters in Stockholm to an audio installation in Stockholm that turned a building into a giant musical instrument. His books include Strange Ritual, Your Action World, The New Sins / Los Nuevos Pecados, Envisioning Emotional Epistemological Information (containing 5 PowerPoint presentations set to music), and his most recent Arboretum (McSweeney's).

About Miranda July

Miranda July is a filmmaker, performing artist and writer. She grew up in Berkeley, California where she began her career by writing plays and staging them at the local punk club. July?s videos, performances, and web-based projects have been presented at sites such as the Museum of Modern Art, the Guggenheim Museum and in the 2002 and 2004 Whitney Biennials. Her short fiction has been published in The Paris Review, Harper?s, and The New Yorker, and her new book is No One Belongs Here More Than You: Stories (Scribner). July created the participatory website, learningtoloveyoumore, with artist Harrell Fletcher and a companion book will be published in Fall 2007. July wrote, directed and starred in her first feature-length film, Me and You and Everyone We Know, which won a special jury prize at the Sundance Film Festival and four prizes at the Cannes Film Festival, including the Camera d?Or. July recently debuted a new performance, and is currently working on her second movie. She lives in Los Angeles.

About Becky Stark

Becky Stark's band, Lavender Diamond, just released their first album Imagine Our Love on Matador Records.?They are currently touring the United States. Becky has written and performed many songs, fables, mythologies and operettas.? She toured the US with the operetta "Birdsongs of the Bauharoque," a musical story she created with Xander Marro about the invention of peace on earth.?She has recently written and performed an operatic adaptation of The Little Match Girl.?Becky studied Russian Literature at Brown University and dance at the Merce Cunningham Conservatory. She is currently developing a musical comedy variety show.?She is also the creator of the "Peace Comics" along with cartoonist Ron Rege, Jr.?

REBECCA MEAD in conversation with Henry Alford: The Selling of the American Wedding

Thursday, May 24, 2007, 7 p.m.

WHAT IS A WEDDING FOR?

Rebecca Mead will be in conversation with Henry Alford to discuss Bridezillas, ministers-for-hire, heirloom manufacturers, Disney's Fairy Tale Weddings program, and the Oh, Mommy moment. For better or for worse, the way we marry is the way we are. So what does the American wedding with its softball games, its matching linens, and its $161 billion industrial infrastructure tell us about American life today?

About Rebecca Mead

Rebecca Mead is the author of One Perfect Day: The Selling of the American Wedding, a book that does for the matrimony industry what Jessica Mitford in the American Way of Death did for the funeral business, according to Holly Brubach in the New York Times. Mead was born in London, educated at Oxford and at N.Y.U. She has been a staff writer at the New Yorker since 1997, where she has interviewed everyone from goat herders in Mongolia to members of the fashion-obsessed social elite of Såo Paulo, and from Slavoj Žižek to Shaquille O'Neal.

About Henry Alford

Henry Alford is the author of a humor collection, Municipal Bondage: One Man's Anxiety-Producing Adventures on the Big City, and of an account of his misadventures in the acting trade, Big Kiss: One Actor's Desperate Attempt to Claw His Way to the Top, which won a Thurber Prize. He contributes to Vanity Fair, the New York Times, and the New Yorker.

ALMA GUILLERMOPRIETO: The Romance of It All Three Aspects of Latin America The Joanna Jackson Goldman Lectures Part One May 8 Part Two May 15 Part Three May 22

Tuesday, May 22, 2007, 7 p.m.

Alma Guillermoprieto, the author most recently of Dancing with Cuba: A Memoir of the Revolution, delivers three talks on contemporary Latin America.

Please note that each event is ticketed separately.

PART ONE: Revisiting the El Mozote Massacre: How the Dead are Forgotten, and Survive

Tuesday, May 8, 7:00 PM

South Court Auditorium

In her first talk, Guillermoprieto revisits the 1981 massacre in El Mozote, El Salvador, which was indirectly sponsored (and subsequently denied) by the Reagan Administration. Through the story of Rufina Amaya, the last survivor of the massacre, Guillermoprieto explores the troubling intersections of government, the media, human rights, and the fickle nature of United States public interest in Latin America.

PART TWO: Carnival and the Samba Overlords

Tuesday, May 15, 7:00 PM

Berger Forum

The general myth about carnival is that it provides an occasion for turning the social order upside-down. In her second talk, Guillermoprieto shows how the opposite is true in Rio de Janeiro, and particularly on the hill of Mangueira, headquarters for Brazil's most beloved samba school. There, as elsewhere in Brazil, the prevalence of violence and drug trafficking has left most Brazilians with a life that is constantly, frighteningly and irremediably upside-down, and they look every year to carnival to impose a fleeting, joyful, order on it.

PART THREE: How to be Mexican: An Instruction Manual in Music and Song

Tuesday, May 22, 7:00 PM

South Court Auditorium

Mexicans have been governed by a false dichotomy for decades in their relationship with the United States, one that asserts that it is not possible to be modern and Mexican at the same time. In her final talk, Guillermoprieto discusses the destructive nature of this prevailing national logic, and uses contemporary Mexican music to illuminate changing notions of Mexican identity and the rich border territories that can exist between traditional culture and the cult of modernity.

This event is co-presented with

About Alma Guillermoprieto

Alma Guillermoprieto is an award-winning journalist who has written about Latin America for more than twenty years. A frequent contributor to the New York Review of Books and the New Yorker, Guillermoprieto covered the insurrection against Anastasio Somoza in Nicaragua for the Guardian and broke the story of the massacre at El Mozote for the Washington Post. She is the author of four books: Samba, an account of the year she spent with the impoverished carnival-makers of Brazil that was nominated for the 1990 National Book Critics Circle Award; The Heart That Bleeds; and Looking for History: Dispatches from Latin America. Her latest book is Dancing with Cuba: A Memoir of the Revolution. Her work has been honored with a MacArthur Fellowship, a George Polk Award, and a Nieman Fellowship (Harvard University), among other awards, and she is a co-founder of the Fundacion Nuevo Periodismo Iberoamericano/ New Journalism Foundation, in Colombia.

CHRISTOPHER HITCHENS and AL SHARPTON: A Debate God Is Not Great

Monday, May 7, 2007, 7 p.m.

Taking on possibly the greatest issue of our time the malignant force of religion in the world?Christopher Hitchens makes the ultimate case against religion through a close and learned reading of the major religious texts, citing numerous historical instances in which sexual repression and outrageous acts of violence have been committed in the name of God. He argues for a more secular life based on science and reason, in which hell is replaced by the Hubble telescope's awesome view of the universe, and Moses and the burning bush give way to the beauty and symmetry of the double helix. 

About Christopher Hitchens

Christopher Hitchens is a contributing editor to Vanity Fair and a visiting professor of liberal studies at the New School. He regularly writes for the Atlantic Monthly and Slate, and is the author of numerous books, including Letters to a Young Contrarian and Why Orwell Matters. He was a longtime contributor to The Nation, writing a biweekly column for the magazine from 1982 to 2002. He was named one of the Top 100 Public Intellectuals by Foreign Policy and Britain's Prospect. His new book is God Is Not Great: How Religion Poisons Everything.

About Al Sharpton

Reverend Al Sharpton, is the President of the National Action Network (NAN), and one of America's most-renowned civil rights leaders. Whether it was his run for President of the United States in the Democratic Party primaries in 2004 or his use of passive resistance and non-violent civil disobedience, Reverend Sharpton has had an impact on national politics because of his strong commitment to equality and progressive politics.As the head of one of the most well-known civil rights organizations that currently has over thirty-eight chapters and affiliates across the United States, Reverend Al Sharpton has been applauded by both supporters and non-supporters for challenging the American political establishment to be inclusive to all people regardless of race, gender, class or beliefs. This summer across the country, Reverend Al Sharpton will launch his own nationally-syndicated news-talk program. Rush Limbaugh has said on his own radio program that Reverend Sharpton has the best shot of anyone at becoming the 'Limbaugh of the Left' by launching a major hard news driven radio show that attracts a strong following. Reverend Sharpton is the author of Al On America and Go and Tell Pharoah.

ADAM PHILLIPS in conversation with Paul Holdengräber SIDE EFFECTS: What Falls out of your Pockets once you Start to Speak

Friday, May 4, 2007, 7 p.m.

"Psychoanalysis does not need more abstruse or sentimental abstractions--any new paradigms or radical revisions--it just needs more good sentences." Adam Phillips

Adam Phillips is the author of:

On Kissing, Tickling and Being Bored, On Flirtation, Monogamy, Going Sane, and now Side Effects.

Stylish brilliance, playfulness, daringly suggestive titles and many good sentences are the mark of every book by Adam Phillips, one of the very best essayists at work today. Whether turning his attention to tickling, kissing, being bored, or monogamy ("there is a difference between not doing something because you believe it is wrong, and not doing something because you might be punished for it), reading Phillips is a dazzling, at times exhilarating experience. As the Observer of London wrote, "one thing you will never be is bored."

In his new book, Side Effects, Phillips claims that psychoanalysis as a form of therapy works by attending to the patient's side effects, that is, 'what falls out of his pockets once he starts speaking.'

Who knows what will fall out of Adam Phillips' pockets once he starts to talk. This conversation is one way of finding out.

About Adam Phillips

Adam Phillips is an essayist, psychoanalyst, and the author of eleven books, including On Kissing, Tickling, and Being Bored; On Flirtation; Darwin's Worms; Houdini's Box; and Equals. He writes regularly for the New York Times, The Observer, and The London Review of Books, and is General Editor of the new Penguin Modern Classics Freud translations. His new book is Side Effects.

About Paul Holdengräber

Paul Holdengräber is the Director of Public Programs now known as "LIVE from the NYPL" for The Research Libraries of The New York Public Library.

SEX & DANGER PEN WORLD VOICES: The New York Festival of International Literature

Sunday, April 29, 2007, 4 p.m.

Tinling Choong, Dany LaFerrière, Camelia Entekhabifard, and Edmund White have written books that play with taboo and off-limit aspects of sexuality, whether at home, on the streets, or behind a burka. Join these authors for a discussion with Wayne Koestenbaum about how contemporary literature continues to derive nourishment from eroticism at its most unconventional and forbidden.

About Tinling Choong

Born and raised in Malaysia, Tinling Choong graduated from Wellesley College and is working toward her Ph.D. in East Asian Languages and Literatures at Yale University. Her first novel, FireWife, was published in 2007. She is currently at work on her next novel, Yuyu and the Banyan Tree.

About Dany LaFerrière

Born in Port-au-Prince, Dany LaFerrière worked as a journalist in Ha?ti before moving to Canada. He was a journalist in Canada, and hosted a television program for the TQS network. His first novel was Comment faire l'amour avec un nègre sans se fatiguer (How to Make Love to a Negro Without Getting Tired). The novel was later adapted into a screenplay by LaFerrière and Richard Sadler, and earned a Genie Award nomination for best adapted screenplay. His short stories have also been adapted into the recent film Heading South. LaFerrière divides his time between Montreal and Miami.

About Camelia Entekhabifard

A journalist and native of Tehran, Entekhabifard has been a contributor to O, the Oprah Magazine and has reported on Iranian and Afghan affairs for AP, Reuters, EurasiaNet, The Village Voice, and Mother Jones. In Iran, she wrote for a number of newspapers, including the leading reformist daily, Zan. In 1999, at the age of 26, she was arrested for her journalistic activities and spent three months in solitary confinement.

About Edmund White

Edmund White was born in Cincinnati and grew up in Chicago and Illinois. He is the author of nearly 20 books, including the recent autobiography My Lives. His novels include Forgetting Elena and Nocturnes for the King of Naples. His cultural works include the anthology Gay Short Fiction, a travelogue States of Desire: Travels in Gay America, and a pioneering The Joy of Gay Sex: An Intimate Guide for Gay Men to the Pleasures of a Gay Life. Edmund White currently teaches writing at Princeton University.

About Wayne Koestenbaum

Wayne Koestenbaum's publications include the nonfiction books Andy Warhol and Cleavage: Essays on Sex, Stars and Aesthetics; the novel Moira Orfei in Aigues-Mortes, and the poetry collections Model Homes, The Milk of Inquiry, Rhapsodies of a Repeat Offender, and Ode to Anna Moffo and Other Poems. Koestenbaum won a Whiting Writer's Award in 1994. He is a Professor of English at the CUNY Graduate Center and a Visiting Professor in the Painting Department of the Yale School of Art.

RYSZARD KAPUSCINSKI: A Tribute PEN WORLD VOICES: The New York Festival of International Literature

Sunday, April 29, 2007, 2 p.m.

A celebration of the life and work of Ryszard Kapuscinski, visionary journalist and world-besotted fabulist, and one of the great travelers of the 20th century (true heir to his hero and subject of his last book, Travels with Herodotus). Kapuscinski was a living link between Bruno Schulz and Gabriel García Márquez, with whom he was still team-teaching classes to young Latin American journalists only a few years back.

Salman Rushdie, Philip Gourevitch, Adam Michnik, Lawrence Weschler, Carolin Emcke, and Breyten Breytenbach join together to contemplate the lasting significance of this Polish master and longtime PEN supporter, who died earlier this year in Warsaw at the age of 74. There will be readings by Elzbieta Czyzewska and scenes from Gabrielle Pfeiffer's documentary, A Poet on the Frontline: The Reportage of Ryszard Kapuscinski.

Curated by Philip Gourevitch, Lawrence Weschler, and Paul Holdengräber

This event is co-sponsored by PEN American Center in association with PEN World Voices, The New York Festival of International Literature; The New York Institute for the Humanities; The Paris Review, and The Polish Cultural Institute.

About Salman Rushdie

Salman Rushdie was born in Bombay, India. He has served as honorary Vice-President, Member Trustee-at-Large, and President of PEN American Center. His novels include Midnight's Children, Shame, The Satanic Verses, Haroun and the Sea of Stories, The Ground Beneath Her Feet, Fury, and Shalimar the Clown. Rushdie has won the Booker Prize, the Booker of Bookers,? the Whitbread Prize, the Writer's Guild Award, the Aristeion Prize, and major literary awards in Germany, France, Italy, Austria, and Hungary. He was also a founder and first President of the International Parliament of Writers. He lives in New York City.

About Philip Gourevitch

Philip Gourevitch is the editor of The Paris Review and a long-time staff writer for The New Yorker. He is the author of A Cold Case and We Wish To Inform You That Tomorrow We Will Be Killed With Our Families: Stories from Rwanda, winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award, the Los Angeles Times Book Prize, and in England, the Guardian First Book Award. Gourevitch traveled extensively for a decade, writing from Africa, Asia, and Europe, and in 2004, he was The New Yorker's Washington Correspondent, covering the presidential election. He lives in Brooklyn and is at work with the filmmaker Errol Morris on a new book about Abu Ghraib.

About Adam Michnik

Adam Michnik was born in Warsaw, Poland. He is one of Poland's leading journalists and former dissident, historian, writer, lecturer, and editor-in-chief of Gazeta Wyborcza, the first independent Polish daily newspaper. His books include Letters from Freedom: Post-Cold War Realities and Perspectives, The Church and the Left, and Letters from Prison and Other Essays.

About Lawrence Weschler

Lawrence Weschler was a staff writer at The New Yorker for over 20 years. His books include The Passion of Poland; A Miracle, A Universe: Settling Accounts with Torturers; Calamities of Exile; Vermeer in Bosnia; Mr. Wilson's Cabinet of Wonder; and most recently, Everything That Rises: A Book of Convergences, which was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award in Criticism. He is serving concurrently as director of the New York Institute for the Humanities and the Chicago Humanities Festival. He is a contributing editor with McSweeney's and the Virginia Quarterly Review.

About Carolin Emcke

Carolin Emcke is a journalist, political theorist, and writer. She has a doctorate in philosophy and has been a visiting lecturer in political theory at Yale. As a staff writer for the foreign news desk of Der Spiegel, she has written about war crimes and human rights violations in countries around the world, among them Afghanistan, Iraq, Lebanon, Pakistan, and Colombia. Emcke's book Echoes of Violence: Letters from a War Reporter, was named Political Book of the Year in Germany in 2005. In 2006 she was awarded the Ernst-Blöch-Foerderpreis, a German award given to scholars and philosophers of extraordinary promise. Carolin Emcke lives in Berlin.

About Breyten Breytenbach

A native of South Africa, Breyten Breytenbach is a painter, activist, and writer of poetry, novels, short-story compilations, essays, and dramatic works. From 1975 to 1982, he was a political prisoner serving two terms of solitary confinement in South African prisons. His most renowned work is the four-volume memoir of this odyssey: A Season in Paradise, The True Confessions of an Albino Terrorist, Return to Paradise, and Dog Heart: A Memoir. Breytenbach's poetry collections include The Iron Cow Must Sweat and Footscript. His most recent poetry collection is Lady One. Breytenbach has been honored with many awards and has taught at the University of Natal, Princeton University, and the University of Cape Town.

About Elzbieta Czyzewska

Elzbieta Czyzewska first achieved acclaim as one of the foremost stars in the Polish sixties cinematic new wave, variously featured in such films as Andrzej Wajda's Everything for Sale and Wojciech Has's The Saragossa Manuscript. Following her emigration to America, she became a regular both on and off Broadway, starring in productions by directors ranging from Mac Wellman and Robert Wilson through Wajda and Martha Clarke. She also returned occasionally to Warsaw, starring, for example, in the Polish premiere of John Guare's Six Degrees of Separation.

VOYAGE & VOYEUR: Travel and Travel Writing PEN WORLD VOICES: The New York Festival of International Literature

Sunday, April 29, 2007, 12 noon

What place does travel writing have in an age of instant news and pictures? Are there truths that only language can convey? What is the relationship of a travel writer to his or her subject? Alain de Botton, Ma Jian, and IIija Trojanow will discuss using words to capture the feeling of a place for their readers at home and around the world. Paul Holdengräber will moderate.

About Alain de Botton

Alain de Botton was born in Switzerland and moved with his family to England when he was eight years old. De Botton has written about literature in How Proust Can Change Your Life, relationships in On Love, social hierarchy in Status Anxiety, and going abroad in The Art of Travel. In his most recent book, The Architecture of Happiness, de Botton asks what a beautiful building does, and discusses ways in which our environment affects our identity. De Botton regularly contributes to English newspapers such as The Independent and helps to run the production company Seneca Productions. He lives in London where he is Director of the Graduate Philosophy Program at London University.

About Ma Jian

Ma Jian was born in Qingdao, China. He worked as a photographer for a petrochemical plant later moving to Beijing, where he joined the No Name Art Group and worked as a photojournalist for a state-run magazine. At 30, he was targeted in a government campaign against "spiritual pollution," which drove him to give up his job and travel for three years across China?a journey described in his book Red Dust, which won the 2002 Thomas Cook Award for Travel Writing. After the Chinese government banned his books in 1987, he moved to Hong Kong. Ten years later, he moved to London, where he now lives. He has written nine books, including novels, short-story collections, and essays, and has been published in 14 languages. His translated fiction includes The Noodle Maker and Stick Out Your Tongue.

About Ilija Trojanow

Ilija Trojanow was born in Bulgaria. In 1971, his family gained political asylum in Germany and a year later moved to Kenya. In 1989, he founded the Marino Publishing House, which specialized in African literature. His books include In Afrika: Mythos und Alltag Ostafrikas, and Guardians of the Soil: Meeting Zimbabwe Elders with Chenjerai Hove. In 1998, Trojanow moved to Bombay. He wrote reportages and essays for the Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung, among other newspapers. More recent books include Along the Ganges: To the Inner Shores of India and the novel Der Weltensammler. For this most recent book, he was awarded the 2006 Leipzig Book Fair Prize for fiction, the 2007 Berlin Literature Prize, and was short-listed for the 2006 German Book Prize. Ilija Trojanow lives in Cape Town.


About Paul Holdengräber

Paul Holdengräber is the Director of Public Programs now known as "LIVE from the NYPL" for The Research Libraries of The New York Public Library.

JULIA ALVAREZ: Saving the World

Monday, April 23, 2007, 7 p.m.

An evening with Julia Alvarez, whose latest book is Saving the World, a novel that probes the depths of politics, medicine, activism, and love featuring two extraordinary women — a 19th-century Spanish spinster and a best-selling Latina novelist transplanted to the United States.

About Julia Alvarez

Julia Alvarez is a poet, essayist and fiction writer. She spent her early childhood in the Dominican Republic, emigrating to this country at the age of ten. Her works include How the García Girls Lost Their Accents, which was selected as a Notable Book by the New York Times and the American Library Association, and In the Time of the Butterflies, a finalist for the 1995 National Book Critics? Award in fiction. She is also the author of two other novels, ¡YO! and In the Name of Salomé ; a collection of essays, Something to Declare; and five books of poetry: The Housekeeping Book, The Other Side/El Otro Lado, Homecoming: New and Collected, Seven Trees, and most recently, The Woman I Kept to Myself. She also writes books for young readers. Alvarez is a writer-in-residence at Middlebury College and she and her husband have established a sustainable farming project and literacy center in the mountains of her native Dominican Republic. Her "green fable," A Cafecito Story, is based on her experiences on that farm.

THE ROSENBACH COMPANY: A Musical A Story of Bibliomania by Ben Katchor & Mark Mulcahy

Friday, April 20, 2007, 7 p.m.

BIBLIOMANIA is brought to vivid life at the Library in this pop-musical account of one of the world's pre-eminent rare-book dealers of the last century, Abe Rosenbach, and his brother Philip. Libretto and animated, projected illustrations by current Cullman Fellow and graphic novelist Ben Katchor, and music by composer and singer Mark Mulcahy.

This event is co-presented with

About Ben Katchor

Ben Katchor is a graphic novelist whose books include Julius Knipl, Real Estate Photographer: Stories; The Jew of New York; and The Beauty Supply District. His picture-stories and drawings appear in the Forward, Metropolis magazine, and The New Yorker, and his current weekly strip, "Shoehorn Technique," appears in the Forward and The Chicago Reader. He has created several music-theater productions, including The Slug Bearers of Kayrol Island and The Rosenbach Company, both with composer Mark Mulcahy, and The Carbon-Copy Building, with Bang on a Can/Ridge Theater, which won an Obie for Best New Production in 1999. He has received fellowships from the MacArthur and Guggenheim Foundations and was a fellow at The American Academy in Berlin. He is currently a Fellow at the Dorothy and Lewis B. Cullman Center of the New York Public Library.

About Mark Mulcahy

Mark Mulcahy is a composer and singer-songwriter who has recorded several albums with Loose Records, including In Pursuit of Your Happiness and Smile Sunset. He is co-creator, with Ben Katchor, of two musical theater pieces, The Rosenbach Company and The Slug-Bearers of Kayrol Island. Mulcahy previously fronted the New Haven-based band Miracle Legion, and later, Polaris; a house band for the early 1990s alternative television series The Adventures of Pete & Pete that gained renown for the songs "Hey Sandy" (featured in the opening credits of each show), "Waiting for October" and "Saturnine." As a solo artist, Mulcahy has opened for many notable performers including Oasis and Jeff Buckley, and received homage from Radiohead frontman Thom Yorke, who dedicated a song to Mulcahy at a Boston show. Mulcahy's song "Hey, Self-Defeater" was featured in Nick Hornby's 31 Songs.

JAN MORRIS, Travel Writer Extraordinaire, in conversation with Paul Holdengräber: Around the World in 50 Years

Friday, April 13, 2007, 7 p.m.

The Richard B. Salomon Distinguished Lectures* & LIVE from the NYPL present:

AROUND THE WORLD IN 50 YEARS

To celebrate the 80th birthday of Jan Morris, one of the greatest travel writers and essayist, Paul Holdengräber will conversationally ramble with the writer through some of the matters that have preoccupied her during a long life. For example:

  • Patriotism
  • The Practice of Travel
  • Dislike of Concerts
  • Norwegian Forest Cats
  • The British Empire
  • The Superiority of Small Countries (Notably Wales)
  • Journalism at Mount Everest
  • Marmalade vs Grape Jelly
  • Venice vs Trieste
  • Connoisseurship (ugh!)
  • Intellectualism (yuk!)
  • Death, Glories and Agonies of Family Life
  • The Power of Kindness
  • 57 Years of a Curious Friendship
  • 53 Years of Visiting NY

And anything else that comes into their minds.

About Jan Morris

Jan Morris was born in 1926 to a Welsh father and an English mother, and lived and wrote in the persona of James Morris before completing a change of sexual role in 1972. She gave the world a famous account of this change of identity in her book, Conundrum. After four years in the British Army, and a degree course at Oxford, she spent five years as a foreign correspondent for the London Times, and five years more for the old Manchester Guardian, before leaving journalism for the writing of books. Morris scored a notable scoop in 1953 by accompanying the British expedition which was the first to scale Mount Everest.

She has published some 40 works of history, travel, autobiography and fiction, among them, Manhattan 45, Pleasures of a Tangled Life, Hong Kong, Trieste and the Meaning of Nowhere, A Writer's House in Wales, The Matter of Wales: Epic Views of a Small Country, Spain, Oxford, The World: Life & Travel 1950-2000, Pax Britannica Trilogy, The World of Venice, Last Letters from Hav, and Coast to Coast: A Journey Across 1950's America.

She accepted her Commander of the Order of the British Empire in the 1999 Queen's Birthday Honours, out of polite respect. She lives in Wales with her lifelong friend Elizabeth, in close touch with their four children and seven grandchildren. Jan Morris has taken a great interest in Welsh culture, becoming a member of the Eisteddfod bardic Orseed.

About Paul Holdengräber

Paul Holdengräber is the Director of Public Programs - now known as "LIVE from the NYPL" - for The Research Libraries of The New York Public Library.

*These annual lectures made possible by an endowed fund established by the friends and associates of the late Richard B. Salomon.

Leslie BENNETTS & Elissa SCHAPPELL debate "The Feminine Mistake"

Tuesday, April 10, 2007, 7 p.m.

The Richard B. Salomon Distinguished Lectures* & LIVE from the NYPL present:

Elissa Schappell will take on Leslie Bennetts provocative assertion that women cannot afford to quit their day jobs to be stay-at-home moms. When women agonize about balancing work and family, many  solve  the problem by abandoning their careers. But as Leslie Bennetts demonstrates in her new book, The Feminine Mistake, it's dangerous to depend on anyone else to support you, and most full-time mothers will ultimately find their economic security challenged by divorce, a husband's unemployment, his illness or even death. And yet few think about such risks?or about the surprising benefits of work. Despite the stress of the juggling act, working mothers are actually happier and even healthier than full-time homemakers. The Feminine Mistake documents both the bad news and the good news with an inspiring new spin on a hot-button topic.

About Leslie Bennetts

Leslie Bennetts has been a contributing editor at Vanity Fair since 1988. Her 2005 cover story on Jennifer Aniston was the best-selling issue in the magazine's history, and the People magazine cover story about Bennetts interview with Aniston was the best-selling issue in the history of People. Prior to joining Vanity Fair, Bennetts spent fifteen years as a newspaper reporter. She began covering so-called  women's issues at The Philadelphia Bulletin in the early 1970's, and has continued to write about women, marriage, families and parenting ever since. After five years at The Bulletin, where she won many awards for writing and reporting, Bennetts spent ten years as a reporter at The New York Times, where she started as a writer for the Style page and went on to cover national politics, metropolitan news, City Hall, and cultural news. She was the first woman ever to cover a presidential campaign for The Times.

About Elissa Schappell

Elissa Schappell is the author of USE ME and co-editor with Jenny Offill of the anthologies, The Friend Who Got Away and Money Changes Everything. She is a co-founder and editor-at-large of Tin House, and a contributing editor to Vanity Fair. She lives in Brooklyn with her husband and two children.

*These annual lectures made possible by an endowed fund established by the friends and associates of the late Richard B. Salomon.

A Tribute to PRIMO LEVI

Thursday, April 5, 2007, 7 p.m.

The Richard B. Salomon Distinguished Lectures* & LIVE from the NYPL present:

"I am a normal man with a good memory who fell into a maelstrom and got out of it more by luck than by virtue, and who from that time on has preserved a certain curiosity about maelstroms large and small, metaphorical and actual."
Primo Levi 1919-1987

To commemorate the 20th anniversary of Primo Levi's death, Joan Acocella, Alessandra Bastagli, Ruth Franklin, Ann Goldstein, and Adam Kirsch pay tribute to Levi's legacy as well as discuss his unpublished stories now translated in A Tranquil Star. The actress Maria Tucci reads from this collection. Robert Weil moderates.

A Tranquil Star, seventeen stories first published in Italian between 1949 and 1986 and now translated into English by Ann Goldstein and Alessandra Bastagli, demonstrates Levi's extraordinary range, from the primal resistance of a captured partisan fighter to a middle-aged chemist experimenting with a new paint that wards off evil, to the lustful thoughts of an older man obsessed with a mysterious woman in a seaside villa. This collection once again affirms Primo Levi?s position as one of the twentieth century's most enduring writers.

About Primo Levi

Primo Levi was an Italian-Jewish writer and chemist, who first gained fame with his book, If This is a Man, an autobiographical story of survival in Nazi concentration camps. For the last forty years of his life, Levi devoted himself to attempting to deal with the fact that he was not killed in Auschwitz. "The worst survived, that is, the fittest; the best all died," he said. Among Levi's other works is The Periodic Table where he used the Russian chemist Mendeleyev's periodical table of elements as the basis of autobiographical meditations. If Not Now, When combined the emergence of Jewish consciousness and action taken to rescue victims of concentration camps. His last work was the essay collection The Drowned and the Saved where he writes that in the camp system useless violence dehumanized both guards and prisoners. "Before dying the victim must be degraded, so that the murderer will be less burdened by guilt," he stated. Levi also published poetry, science fiction, and short stories. He died in 1987, at the age of 67, in what some believe was suicide. Italo Calvino called Levi "one of the most important and gifted writers of our time."

About Joan Acocella

Joan Acocella is a staff writer for The New Yorker. Among her books are Mark Morris, Willa Cather and the Politics of Criticism, and Creating Hysteria: Women and Multiple Personality Disorder. Twenty-eight Artists and Two Saints, a collection of her essays (including one on Primo Levi), was just published.

About Alessandra Bastagli

Alessandra Bastagli is the translator from the German of Jurek Becker's The Boxer and co-translator with Ann Goldstein of Primo Levi's A Tranquil Star. She works as a book editor in New York.

About Ruth Franklin

Ruth Franklin is a senior editor at The New Republic. Her writing also appears in The New Yorker, Slate, and The New York Times Book Review, among other publications. She is at work on a book about the literature of the Holocaust.

About Ann Goldstein

Ann Goldstein is an editor at The New Yorker. She has translated works by, among others, Primo Levi, Pier Paolo Pasolini, Alessandro Baricco, Elena Ferrante, and Roberto Calasso, and is currently editing the Complete Works of Primo Levi in English. She has been the recipient of several prizes, including the PEN Renato Poggioli prize, and an award from the Italian Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

About Adam Kirsch

Adam Kirsch is the book critic of the New York Sun. He is the author of a book of poems, The Thousand Wells, and a critical study, "The Wounded Surgeon."

About Maria Tucci

Maria Tucci began her career in the original production of Tennessee Williams' The Milk Train Doesn't Stop Here Anymore. Later she won a Tony nomination for her portrayal of Rosa in the revival of The Rose Tatoo. She has worked extensively on and off Broadway, including Requiem For A Heavyweight (Tony Award Nomination), Athol Fugard's A Lesson From Aloes, and Mike. Her film credits include Sweet Nothing and To Die For, directed by Gus Van Sant.

About Robert Weil

Robert Weil is an Executive Editor at W. W. Norton & Company. He has commissioned from the Italian publisher, Giulio Einaudi Editore, both the The Complete Works of Primo Levi, as well as A Tranquil Star, which inaugurates Norton's involvement with the literary estate of Primo Levi. Weil has worked with many writers, including Anthony Appiah, Robert Crumb, Patricia Highsmith, Clive James, Paul McCartney, Jan Morris, Henry Roth, Oliver Stone, and Edward O. Wilson.

*These annual lectures made possible by an endowed fund established by the friends and associates of the late Richard B. Salomon.

CLIVE JAMES in conversation with Paul Holdengräber: Cultural Amnesia

Monday, March 26, 2007, 7 p.m.

The Richard B. Salomon Distinguished Lectures* & LIVE from the NYPL present:

Echoing Edward Said's belief that "Western humanism is not enough, we need a universal humanism," the renowned critic Clive James presents his life's work in a new cultural canon that celebrates truth over hypocrisy, literature over totalitarianism. Containing over one hundred essays and nearly 40 years in the making, Cultural Amnesia illuminates, rescues, or occasionally destroys the careers of many of the greatest thinkers, humanists, musicians, artists, and philosophers of the twentieth century. In discussing, among others, Louis Armstrong, Walter Benjamin, Sigmund Freud, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Franz Kafka, Marcel Proust, and Ludwig Wittgenstein, James writes:

"If the humanism that makes civilization civilized is to be preserved into the new century, it will need advocates. These advocates will need a memory, and part of that memory will need to be of an age in which they were not yet alive."

Jacob Weisberg will introduce the evening. He is the editor of Slate, a free on-line daily magazine offering analysis and commentary about politics, news, and culture.

About Clive James

Born in Australia, Clive James has lived in London and Cambridge for over 40 years. During this time James established himself as one of the most influential metropolitan critics of his generation, as well as a television performer, writer and producer, author, poet and lyricist. His major series Fame in the Twentieth Century was broadcast in Britain, Australia, and the U.S. His collections of essays include Reliable Essays, Even as We Speak, and The Meaning of Recognition. Other works include the North Face of Soho, the fourth volume of his memoirs; novels Brilliant Creatures and The Silver Castle; a complete edition of poetry,The Book of My Enemy; and a collection of travel writings, Flying Visits. After helping to found the television production company Watchmaker, Clive James became chairman of the Internet enterprise Welcome Stranger. He now heads one of its subsidiaries, www.clivejames.com, the world?s first personal multi-media website of its type. His new book, Cultural Amnesia, is a study of cultural discontinuity in the twentieth century.

About Jacob Weisberg

Jacob Weisberg is editor of Slate. He was previously Slate's chief political correspondent and the originator of its "Strange Bedfellow" and "Ballot Box" columns. Before joining Slate in 1996, he wrote about politics for magazines including the New Republic, Newsweek, and New York Magazine, and has written as well for Vanity Fair and the New York Times Magazine. He is the co-author, with Robert E. Rubin, of In an Uncertain World. He is also the author of In Defense of Government, the 2000 eBook The Road to Chadville, and the Bushisms series.

About Paul Holdengräber

Paul Holdengräber is the Director of Public Programs now known as "LIVE from the NYPL" for The Research Libraries of The New York Public Library.

*These annual lectures made possible by an endowed fund established by the friends and associates of the late Richard B. Salomon.

MIRA NAIR & JHUMPA LAHIRI: A Dialogue

Saturday, March 10, 2007, 6 p.m.

The Richard B. Salomon Distinguished Lectures* & LIVE from the NYPL present:

A dialogue between Pulitzer prize-winning fiction writer Jhumpa Lahiri (The Namesake) and filmmaker Mira Nair, whose motion picture adaptation of The Namesake opens in the U.S. the preceding day.

About Mira Nair

Film Director Mira Nair was born in Rourkela, India. From India Cabaret to The Laughing Club of India, Nair?s documentaries paved the way for her debut feature film, Salaam Bombay! which was nominated for an Academy Award, a Golden Globe, and a BAFTA for Best Foreign Language film in 1988. Subsequent films include Mississippi Masala, The Perez Family, Kama Sutra: A Tale of Love, My Own Country, Hysterical Blindness, 9/11/ 01  September 11 (segment 'India'), Monsoon Wedding, and Vanity Fair. In 2003, Mira Nair founded an annual filmmakers laboratory, Maisha, dedicated to the support of visionary screenwriters and directors in East Africa and South Asia. She also served as the mentor in film for the prestigious Rolex Protégé Arts Initiative, helping to guide young artists in critical stages of their development. Nair's company, Mirabai Films, is currently producing a series of four films to raise awareness of the AIDS epidemic in India. Her forthcoming films include The Namesake, an adaptation Pulitzer Prize winning author, Jhumpa Lahiri's debut novel, and Shantaram starring Johnny Depp.

About Jhumpa Lahiri

Jhumpa Lahiri was born in London, England to Bengali parents, and raised in Rhode Island. She has taught creative writing at Boston University and the Rhode Island School of Design. Lahiri has traveled extensively to India and has experienced the effects of colonialism there as well as experienced the issues of the diaspora as it exists. She feels strong ties to her parents' homeland as well as the United States and England. Growing up with ties to all three countries created in Lahiri a sense of homelessness and an inability to feel accepted. Her debut collection, Interpreter of Maladies, won the 2000 Pulitzer Prize for fiction, the PEN/Hemingway Award, the New Yorker Debut of the Year award, an American Academy of Arts and Letters Addison Metcalf Award, and a nomination for the Los Angeles Times Book Prize. It was translated into twenty-nine languages. Lahiri was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship in 2002. The Namesake is Jhumpa Lahiri's first novel.

*These annual lectures made possible by an endowed fund established by the friends and associates of the late Richard B. Salomon.

ANDRÉ ACIMAN & COLM TÓIBÍN: Landscapes of Eros and Loss

Tuesday, March 6, 2007, 6 p.m.

The Richard B. Salomon Distinguished Lectures* & LIVE from the NYPL present:

Colm Tóibín and André Aciman discuss longing, heartbreak and language, the poetics of love and death. Which comes first, they ask, desire or heartbreak, love or loss, and which lasts longer, remembrance or remorse, questions that haunt them, and that they both have explored in their most recent work?Aciman's Call Me By Your Name and Toibin's Mothers and Sons: Stories.

About André Aciman

André Aciman is the author of Out of Egypt and False Papers: Essays on Exile and Memory. He has also co-authored and edited The Proust Project and Letters of Transit. Born in Alexandria, he lived in Italy and France. He is currently the chair of The Graduate Center's doctoral program in Comparative Literature and the director of The Writers' Institute. He is the recipient of a Whiting Writers' Award, a Guggenheim Fellowship, and a fellowship from The Dorothy and Lewis B. Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers at The New York Public Library.

About Colm Tóibín

Irish novelist and journalist Colm Tóibín is the author of numerous works of fiction and non-fiction and is a regular contributor to various newspapers and magazines. He was awarded the E. M. Forster Award in 1995 by the American Academy of Arts and Letters. His novels include The Story of the Night, The Master, and The Blackwater Lightship, which was shortlisted for the Booker Prize for Fiction. His non-fiction includes The Sign of the Cross: Travels in Catholic Europe and The Irish Famine (with Diarmaid Ferriter). In 2002 he was a fellow at The Dorothy and Lewis B. Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers at The New York Public Library to research the life of Irish dramatist Lady Augusta Gregory for his book Lady Gregory's Toothbrush. His latest book is a collection of short stories, Mothers and Sons: Stories.

*These annual lectures made possible by an endowed fund established by the friends and associates of the late Richard B. Salomon.

WERNER HERZOG in conversation with Paul Holdengräber: Was the 20th Century a Mistake?

Friday, February 16, 2007, 6 p.m.

The Richard B. Salomon Distinguished Lectures* & LIVE from the NYPL present:

A conversation with Werner Herzog, one of the greatest living film directors of our times. His films include Aguirre, The Wrath of God, The Enigma of Kaspar Hauser, Nosferatu, Fitzcarraldo, Even Dwarfs Started Small, and Grizzly Man. Filmmaker Nathaniel Kahn (My Architect) will introduce the evening.

About Werner Herzog

Born in Munich, director, screenwriter, producer, and actor Werner Herzog grew up in a remote mountain village in Bavaria and never saw films, television, or telephones as a child. He started traveling on foot from the age of 14 and made his first phone call at the age of 17. During high school he worked the nightshift as a welder in a steel factory to produce films and made his first film in 1961 at the age of 19. Since then he has become one of the most influential filmmakers in New German Cinema producing, writing, and directing more than forty films, publishing more than a dozen books of prose, and directing as many operas. Herzog quickly gained notoriety not only for creating some of the most fantastic narratives in the history of the medium, but for pushing himself and his crew to unprecedented lengths, again and again, in order to achieve the effects he demanded. With the soon to be released of Rescue Dawn, Werner Herzog returns to direct a feature film inspired by his own 1997 documentary, Little Dieter Needs to Fly, which details the escape efforts of a German-American pilot who was taken as a prisoner-of-war after being shot down over Laos during the Vietnam War.

About Nathaniel Kahn

Nathaniel Kahn is a filmmaker. His feature length documentary, My Architect, about his father the architect Louis Kahn, played theatrically worldwide and was nominated for an Academy Award and an Independent Spirit Award. In 2004, Mr. Kahn was the recipient of the Directors Guild of America Award for Outstanding Directorial Achievement in Documentary. His latest film, Two Hands, a short documentary about legendary pianist Leon Fleisher, is nominated for an Academy Award this year.

About Paul Holdengräber

Paul Holdengräber is the Director of Public Programs - now known as "LIVE from the NYPL" - for The Research Libraries of The New York Public Library.

*These annual lectures made possible by an endowed fund established by the friends and associates of the late Richard B. Salomon.

OPENING NIGHT ! Celebrate Valentine's Day with ALINE KOMINSKY CRUMB in conversation with R. CRUMB: Need More Love

Wednesday, February 14, 2007, 6 p.m.

OPENING NIGHT

The Richard B. Salomon Distinguished Lectures* & LIVE from the NYPL present:

A Valentine's Evening with the Crumbs
(The George & Gracie of Comics)

Aline: We've been living and working together for thirty-five years. As I write this I'm astonished that we're so old and that we actually still love each other. Who woulda' thought, when we first met at a party at Robert's girlfriend's house, and he told me that I had "cute knees," that we were about to embark on a life-time adventure together?

Bob: Yeah, who'd a' thought?  She still has cute knees... and the only reason I'm doing this Valentine's Day appearance at the NYPL this year is because Aline asked me to do it with her and I said "okay, I'll do it as a Valentine's Day gift to you, since I've never given you a gift before in our whole life, except for that t-shirt I bought for you in the early 80's"... because, in fact, I hate doing public appearances... I'm becoming more and more of a hermit as I get older... but for Aline I'll do it... don't worry, it'll be a riot... we'll do our schtick... it'll be very entertaining as opposed to intellectual and tedious.

Aline: Actually, all he has to do is ask me a few questions and I can go on for hours...I love to tell "all". I'm compulsively honest... You?ll learn more about us than you would ever need to know. The hard job for Bob'll be to shut me up and get me off the stage... Finally, I get to tell my side o? the story!

Bob: That's right... it's all about promoting Aline's big, new book, Need More Love!! Check it out... February 14, NYPL!

Aline: PS: I've got so many cute outfits. How am I gonna decide what to wear?!

About Aline Kominsky Crumb

Aline Kominsky Crumb was born in Long Island, New York, studied painting, collaborated on, wrote and edited numerous comics, magazines and books starting with Wimmems Comix and Twisted Sisters. She was the first female creator of the graphic novel form, a genre which came to prominence in the eighties. Her influence on comic art is firmly established and her comic strip characters unforgettable. She now lives in a medieval chateau in the south of France with her family. She continues to work on her own and with her husband R. Crumb and can be seen frequently in the New Yorker. Her new graphic novel memoir is Need More Love (MQ Publications).

About R. Crumb

Robert Crumb was born in Philadelphia, and now hides out in the south of France with his wife and fellow artist, Aline Kominsky Crumb. He began his amazing career over forty years ago when as an underground cartoonist during the Summer of Love, he created ZAP COMIX and a horde of unforgettable characters: Fritz the Cat, Mr. Natural, The Snoid and Devil Girl to name but a few. Widely acknowledged as one of the most influential cartoonists of recent times, R. Crumb is the only underground cartoonist to be recognized by the fine art world. His work is exhibited in art museums in Europe and America to critical acclaim. His latest book is The Sweeter Side of R. Crumb (MQ Publications).

*These annual lectures made possible by an endowed fund established by the friends and associates of the late Richard B. Salomon.

DANIEL MENDELSOHN: From Roman Games to Reality TV--Mass Entertainment & Imperial Politics

Tuesday, December 5, 2006, 6 p.m.

The Robert B. Silvers Lecture

Daniel Mendelsohn, a classicist and critic, weaves together observations about popular cultures both ancient and modern, particularly entertainments based on what he calls "spectacles of humiliation" tragedy in Athens, public games in Rome, talk shows and reality TV in America to arrive at provocative conclusions about the relationship between mass entertainment and politics in republics with imperial aspirations.

About Daniel Mendelsohn

Daniel Mendelsohn, an author, journalist, and critic, began his writing career soon after completing his doctorate in Classics at Princeton in 1994. His articles, essays, reviews and translations have appeared in such publications as The New York Review of Books, The New Yorker, The New York Times, The New York Times Book Review, and Travel + Leisure, where is he a contributing editor. He won the 2001 National Book Critics Circle Award for Excellence in Criticism, the 2002 the George Jean Nathan Prize for Drama Criticism and the 2005 Guggenheim Foundation Fellowship. His books include his memoir The Elusive Embrace: Desire and the Riddle of Identity and a scholarly study, Gender and the City in Euripides? Political Plays. His latest book, The Lost: A Search for Six of Six Million, the story of his search to learn about the fates of family members who perished in the Holocaust, became a national bestseller soon after its publication in September. Mr. Mendelsohn is the Charles Ranlett Flint Professor of Humanities at Bard College

About The Robert B. Silvers Lecture

The Robert B. Silvers Lecture is an annual series created by Max Palevsky in recognition of the work of Robert B. Silvers, editor of The New York Review of Books, of which he was a founder in 1963. The series features contemporary people whose fields correspond to the broad range of Mr. Silver's interests in literature, the arts, politics, economics, history, and the sciences.

THOMAS CAHILL in conversation with MARGARET ATWOOD: Thinking Medievally

Friday, December 1, 2006, 6 p.m.

The High Middle Ages (1100 - 1347 A.D.) were extraordinary years for the advancement of science, women, and the arts. But most people today have exactly the opposite understanding of medieval life, envisioning instead rampant barbarism, superstition, and oppression both religious and secular interspersed with impressive castles and gallant knights as high points. This dark, albeit incorrect, view of the Middle Ages might seem like the ideal setting for an adventure film or bodice-ripper novel, but the truth of the time period is far more interesting.

Join historian Thomas Cahill and novelist/poet Margaret Atwood as they discuss Cahill's new book, Mysteries of the Middle Ages: The Rise of Feminism, Science, and Art from the Cults of Catholic Europe. Cahill and Atwood will explore the European cities, people, and ideas that make the Middle Ages so fascinating and essential to who we are today:

The cult of the Virgin and how it encouraged powerful medieval female figures such as Hildegard of Bingen and Eleanor of Aquitaine, who were precursors to modern-day heroines like Eleanor Roosevelt and even Madonna.

The advent of courtly love and the invention of sex as romance.

The nature of reality. Could mud become gold, as the alchemists believed? What about the Eucharist? Did it at some point change from ordinary bread into a mystical reality?

Realism in art. Like scientists, artists began to explore reality as they pondered how to depict the human body, motion, and space.

About Thomas Cahill

Thomas Cahill is the author of "The Hinges of History," a prospective seven-volume series in which the author recounts formative moments in Western civilization. These books include How the Irish Saved Civilization, The Gifts of the Jews, and the latest volume, Mysteries of the Middle Ages: The Rise of Feminism, Science, and Art from the Cults of Catholic Europe. Cahill endeavors to retell the story of the Western world through little-known stories of individuals who had pivotal impacts on history and contributed immensely to Western culture and the evolution of Western sensibility, thus revealing how we have become the people we are and why we think and feel the way we do today.

About Margaret Atwood

Margaret Atwood's books have been published in over thirty-five countries. She is the author of more than forty books of fiction, poetry, and and critical essays. In addition to The Handmaid's Tale, her novels include Cat's Eye, shortlisted for the Booker Prize; Alias Grace, which won the Giller Prize in Canada and the Premio Mondello in italy; The Blind Assasin, winner of the 2000 Booker Prize; and her most recent, Oryx and Crake, shortlisted for the 2003 Booker Prize. She lives in Toronto with writer Graeme Gibson.

UNCLE TOM'S CABIN RECONSIDERED: A Conversation with HENRY LOUIS GATES & MARGO JEFFERSON. Moderated by THELMA GOLDEN

Wednesday, November 29, 2006, 6 p.m.

Once declared worthless and dehumanizing by the novelist and critic James Baldwin, Uncle Tom's Cabin has lacked literary credibility for over fifty years. Now, in a refutation of Baldwin, Henry Louis Gates, Jr. and his co-author, Hollis Robbins, demonstrate the literary transcendence of Harriet Beecher Stowe's masterpiece.

As the annotators show, there has never been a single work of fiction that had a greater effect on the course of American history than Uncle Tom's Cabin. The 1852 epic reified the barbaric cruelties of slavery like no other previous work, transforming it for many Northerners from an abstraction into a hated reality and a blight on the nation. It was in no small part due to Stowe's writing that the debate over slavery became so fevered by the middle of the 1850s.

Despite its historic significance, the novel, which had once influenced writers like Balzac, Zola, and Dickens, gradually lost currency as a masterpiece. No longer seen as the powerful symbol of forbearance, the character Tom became conflated with pejorative symbols, and the book helped define America's attitudes towards race, gender, and even sexuality in the twentieth century.

Now, over fifty years after Baldwin's essay, in a ringing refutation of Baldwin, Henry Louis Gates Jr. demonstrates the literary transcendence of Harriet Beecher Stowe's masterpiece and reinvigorates this classic American story, allowing the modern reader to re-experience Stowe's great American saga from a wholly unique perspective.

This event is co-presented by The Studio Museum in Harlem. 

photo of Thelma Golden by Timothy Greenfield-Sanders 

About Henry Louis Gates, Jr.

Henry Louis Gates, Jr. is most recognized for his extensive research of African American history and literature, and as W.E.B. Dubois Professor of the Humanities, for developing and expanding the African American Studies program at Harvard University. He has discovered and restored thousands of works by African American writers, most notably Harriet E. Wilson's Our Nig (1859), which is widely believed to be the first novel by a black American. He outlined his theory of signifyin' in Figures in Black: Words, Signs, and the Racial Self and The Signifying Monkey: A Theory of Afro-American Literary Criticism. He edited The Norton Anthology of African American Literature, and co-edited The Civitas Anthonology of African American Slave Narratives and Africana: The Encyclopedia of the African and African-American Experience.

About Margo Jefferson

Margo Jefferson was a staff critic for The New York Times from 1993 to 2006. She wrote about books, theater and eventually became a Critic-at-large. She has written and performed in two theater pieces. In 1995 she received a Pulitzer Prize, and her essays for Grand Street and The Nation have received awards from The Coordinating Council of Literary Magazines and The American Library Association. Her book, On Michael Jackson, was published by Pantheon in 2006. She teaches at Columbia University and at Eugene Lang College, The New School University.

About Thelma Golden

Thelma Golden is Director and Chief Curator of The Studio Museum in Harlem. She joined the Whitney Museum of American Art in 1988 as a curator organizing many notable exhibitions, including Black Male: Representations of Masculinity in Contemporary Art. At the Studio Museum, Ms. Golden has organized a number of groundbreaking exhibitions, including Chris Ofili: Afro Muses 1995-2005; Freestyle; Material and Matter; Glenn Ligon: Stranger; Martin Puryear: The Cane Project; and Isaac Julien: Vagabondia.

A Double Celebration: The Atlantic & Sigmund Freud @ 150 GEORGE PROCHNIK, WAYNE KOESTENBAUM & SLAVOJ ŽIŽEK The Atlantic Day of Ideas

Saturday, November 18, 2006, 6 p.m.

GEORGE PROCHNIK & WAYNE KOESTENBAUM: A Conversation

Family History & Its Discontents: Sigmund Freud, Oscar Wilde, Stomach Pains, Death, New England & the Immortal Porcupine

How do our restless readings of our own family histories influence our take on cultural history, and vice-versa?

For all that Freud seems to have been chewed over ad nauseam by detractors and advocates alike, there remain bizarre, intriguing dark spaces where the light at the end of the cigar has failed to fall.

What caused Freud to pass out twice in Jung's presence and, on one occasion, waking in his arms, cry out, How sweet it must be to die?

Why does Freud's classic The Psychopathology of Everyday Life sound in many places like The Importance of Being Earnest?

Why hasn't more attention been paid to the tetherball tournament Freud took part in with a twelve-year-old girl at an Adirondack retreat near Lake Placid?

What, above all, led Freud to place on his desk amidst his ancient bibelots from the ruins of Hellenic and Semitic civilization a large metal porcupine with musical quills manufactured in America at the turn of the century and presented to him by the Boston Brahmin-covert-operative for the St. Louis Hegelians, Dr. James Jackson Putnam?

These questions will be pored over as discreetly as possible by Wayne Koestenbaum and George Prochnik.

This event is co-presented by The Atlantic.

********************************

SLAVOJ ŽIŽEK: A Talk

Are We Allowed Not To Enjoy?

In the last years, we are bombarded by the new wave of the triumphalist acclamations of how psychoanalysis is dead: with the new advances in brain sciences, it is finally put where it belonged all the time, to the lumber-room of pre-scientific obscurantist search for hidden meanings, alongside religious confessors and dream-readers. As Todd Dufresne put it, no figure in the history of human thought was more wrong about all its fundamentals?with the exception of Marx, some would add.

What if, however, this memorial service is a little bit too hasty, commemorating a patient who still has a long life ahead In contrast to the evident truths of the critics of Freud, my talk will argue that it is only today that the time of psychoanalysis has arrived and that Freud?s key insights gain their full value.

Traditionally, psychoanalysis was expected to allow the patient to overcome the obstacles which prevented him/her the access to normal sexual satisfaction: if you are not able to get it, go to the analyst, he will enable you to get rid of your inhibitions? Today, however, when we are bombarded from all sides by the different versions of the injunction Enjoy!, from direct enjoyment in sexual performance to enjoyment in professional achievement or in spiritual awakening, one should move to a more radical level: psychoanalysis is today the only discourse in which you are allowed not to enjoy not not allowed to enjoy, i.e., prohibited to enjoy, but just relieved of the pressure to enjoy.

Slavoj Žižek

This talk is co-presented by the Austrian Cultural Forum NYC.


 

About George Prochnik

George Prochnik's new book is Putnam Camp: Sigmund Freud, James Jackson Putnam, and the Purpose of American Psychology. His essays, poetry, and fiction have appeared in numerous journals. He taught English and American literature at Hebrew University in Jerusalem, and has also worked as a therapist for the chronically mentally ill.

About Wayne Koestenbaum

Wayne Koestenbaum is a Professor of English at the CUNY Graduate Center, and a Visiting Professor in the painting department of the Yale School of Art. His books include Model Homes, The Milk of Inquiry, Moira Orfei in Aigues-Mortes, Andy Warhol, The Queen's Throat, and Double Talk. His next book, Hotel Theory, will be published in Spring 2007.

About Slavoj Žižek

Slavoj Žižek, dialectical-materialist philosopher and psychoanalyst, Co-Director of the International Center for Humanities, Birkbeck College, University of London. Among his latest publications are The Parallax View and How To Read Lacan.

CREATIVE TIME & THE ATLANTIC DAY OF IDEAS The Art of Disarmament: PAUL CHAN in conversation with KATHY KELLY

Saturday, November 18, 2006, 4:30 p.m.

New York artist and activist Paul Chan spent a month in Iraq with Kathy Kelly and the Nobel Peace Prize-nominated organization Voices in the Wilderness immediately prior to the start of the war. He speaks with her about their work, her recent visits to the Middle East, and the Poetics of nonviolence.

About Paul Chan

Paul Chan is an artist in New York. Working in a variety of mediums, from video to installation to drawing, Chan has achieved much acclaim for both his installations and his digital projections that blend a novel drawing and animating style with subtle philosophical reflections on politics, war, and life in the present tense. Chan's work has been exhibited worldwide for the past several years and was last seen in New York at The 2006 Whitney Biennial. Chan has worked with the aid group Voices in the Wilderness (with whom he spent an unsanctioned month in Iraq) and designed The People's Guide to the Republican National Convention (an agitprop map of New York City for use by protesters and delegates in 2004). Yet while such activities may not appear to directly inform his art practice, they tie into his general insistence on "hallucinating" different relationships in contemporary society: between the sacred and the secular, the high and the low, the poetic and the pornographic, drawing comparisons to such artists Chris Marker and William Kentridge.

About Kathy Kelly

Kathy Kelly is Co-Coordinator of Voices for Creative Nonviolence (VCNV). Kathy's work focuses upon ending the war in Iraq, in both its military and economic forms. Long active in peace team efforts, Kathy participated in the Gulf Peace Team (1991); Bosnia (1992-93); and Haiti (1994). In 1996, she co-founded Voices in the Wilderness, a campaign of civil disobedience to challenge U.S.-U.N. economic sanctions imposed against Iraq. Kathy traveled over 20 times to Iraq to build personal relationships and to challenge U.S. policies (over 70 VITW delegations traveled to Iraq from 1996 to 2003). In the summer of 2005, VITW was fined $20,000 for bringing medicine to Iraq without permission of the U.S. government (a fine which VITW refused to pay).

LUST ESTHER PEREL & LAURA KIPNIS PAUL HOLDENGRABER, instigator The Atlantic Day of Ideas

Saturday, November 18, 2006, 3 p.m.

The Erotic & the Domestic: The Pitfalls of Modern Intimacy

"In Mating in Captivity: Reconciling the Erotic and the Domestic," Esther Perel explains that our cultural penchant for equality, fairness, and absolute candor is antithetical to erotic desire for both men and women. Sexual excitement doesn't always play by the rules of good citizenship.

"Laura Kipnis and I examine the pitfalls of modern intimacy, the emphasis on transparency and talking, the feminization of intimacy and how it often confuses closeness with surveillance. Where she is engaged in the polemics of adultery, I work with couples to negotiate the paradoxes of love and desire."

Esther Perel.

THE TROUBLE WITH DIVERSITY: An Argument between WALTER BENN MICHAELS & KATHA POLLITT SCOTT STOSSEL Moderates The Atlantic Day of Ideas

Saturday, November 18, 2006, 1:30 p.m.

Walter Benn Michaels believes that if there is one thing Americans agree on, it's the value of diversity. Katha Pollitt agrees, but as she wrote in the November 6, 2006 issue of The Nation, that, though "I wanted to admire The Trouble with Diversity, Walter Benn Michael's much discussed polemic against identity politics and economic inequality...right away, I ran into trouble.... Michaels is agressively, almost proudly obtuse about racism and sexism, which he sees as distractions from class struggle." Though our corporation vie for slots in the Diversity top 50, and our universities brag about minority recruiting, and every month is Somebody's History Month, Walter Benn Michaels argues that our enthusiastic celebration of "difference" masks our neglect of America's vast and growing economic divide. Katha Pollitt will take on some of the issues raised by Walter Benn Michaels. For instance, affirmative action in schools, Michaels contends, has not made them more open, it's just guaranteed that the rich kids come in the appropriate colors.

Michaels takes on the many manifestations of our devotion to diversity, from companies apologizing for slavery, to a college president explaining why there aren't more women math professors, to the codes of conduct in the new "humane corporations." Looking at the books we read, the TV shows we watch, and the lawsuits we bring, Michaels shows that diversity has become everyone's sacred cow precisely because it offers a false vision of social justice, one that conveniently costs us nothing. The Trouble with Diversity urges us to start thinking about real justice, about equality instead of diversity.

This event is co-presented by The Atlantic.

About Walter Benn Michaels

Walter Benn Michaels is a professor of English at the University of Illinois at Chicago. Widely noted as one of the founders of the New Historicism, he is the author of Our America and The Shape of the Signifier and has contributed to The New York Times Magazine, The Boston Globe and n + 1 among other publications.

About Katha Pollitt

Katha Pollitt's column, "Subject to Debate," appears every other week in The Nation and is frequently reprinted in newspapers across the country. Pollitt has also written essays for The New Yorker, The Atlantic, The New Republic, Harper's, Mirabella, Ms., Glamour, Mother Jones, and The New York Times. She has appeared on NPR's Fresh Air and All Things Considered, Charlie Rose, The McLaughlin Group, CNN, Dateline NBC and the BBC.

About Scott Stossel

Scott Stossel, managing editor of The Atlantic, has been associated with the magazine since 1992 when, shortly after graduating from Harvard, he joined the staff and helped to launch The Atlantic Online. In 1996, he moved to The American Prospect where, over the course of seven years, he served as associate editor, executive editor, and culture editor. He rejoined the Atlantic staff in 2002 and oversaw the magazine's 2005 move to Washington from Boston. Along with writing and editing, Scott has taught courses in the American Studies Department at Trinity College.

GLUTTONY MARIO BATALI, DAN BARBER, BARBARA KAFKA & CORBY KUMMER The Atlantic Day of Ideas

Saturday, November 18, 2006, 12 noon

Does the newest high-tech equipment glorify or destroy the freshest low-tech ingredients? Atlantic food writer Corby Kummer gathers a few leading chefs and thinkers, Mario Batali, Dan Barber, and Barbara Kafka, to map out battle plans for the newest culinary frontier.

This event is co-presented by The Atlantic.

About Mario Batali

Mario Batali creates magic in his many NYC hotspots, the flagship being Babbo Ristorante e Enoteca in Greenwich Village. Babbo was honored as ?The Best New Restaurant of 1998? by The James Beard Foundation, and Ruth Reichl at the New York Times hailed it with three stars. Mario's other restaurants are Lupa, Esca, Otto Enoteca Pizzeria, Casa Mono, Bar Jam?n, and Del Posto along with Italian Wine Merchants. Mario apprenticed with London?s legendary chef Marco Pierre White and spent three years of intense culinary training in the Northern Italian village of Borgo Capanne. Mario hosts two Food Network programs, "Molto Mario" and "Ciao America" and has authored Simple Italian Food, Mario Batali Holiday Food, The Babbo Cookbook, and Molto Italiano: 327 Simple Italian Recipes. Most recently, Mario created the first ever cookbook for NASCAR fans, Mario Tailgates NASCAR Style.

About Dan Barber

Dan Barber began farming and cooking for family and friends at Blue Hill Farm in the Berkshires. Since May 2000, Dan has seen Blue Hill grow from a noted neighborhood restaurant to most recently receiving a 3-star New York Times review. In 2002, Food and Wine Magazine featured Dan as one of the countrys Best New Chefs. He has addressed food system issues through op-eds in the New York Times. In 2004 Blue Hill at Stone Barns and Stone Barns Center for Food and Agriculture opened its doors. As the restaurants chef/owner and the center's creative director, Dan helped create the philosophical and practical framework for Stone Barns Center for Food and Agriculture and continues to help guide it in its mission to create a consciousness about the effects of everyday food choices. Frank Bruni of the New York Times awarded Blue Hill at Stone Barns 3-stars. Both Blue Hill and Blue Hill at Stone Barns have received Best New Restaurant nominations from the James Beard Foundation, and in the spring of 2006 Dan was awarded Best Chef: New York City. Dan serves on Harvards Center for Health and the Global Environment advisory board, and has been working with likeminded organizations to minimize the political and intellectual rhetoric around agricultural policies and to instead maximize the appreciation of eating good food.

About Barbara Kafka

Barbara Kafka is the author of award-winning books her readers swear by, among them Vegetable Love, Winner of the 2006 IACP award for Best Single Subject Cookbook, Roasting: A Simple Art, won the Julia Child Cookbook Award, and Microwave Gourmet. She was a regular contributor to The New York Times and has written extensively for food magazines in the United States, Great Britain, and Australia, including a monthly column, "The Opinionated Palate" for Gourmet and others for Family Circle and Vogue. In the past, Ms. Kafka was active as a consultant to restaurants, industry and as a product designer. For many years she taught with James Beard as well as around the country on her own.

About Corby Kummer

Corby Kummer's work in The Atlantic has established him as one of the most widely read, authoritative, and creative food writers in the United States. Kummer's 1990 Atlantic book The Joy of Coffee, based on an Atlantic series, was heralded by The New York Times as "the most definitive and engagingly written book on the subject to date." Kummer was restaurant critic of New York Magazine in 1995-96 and since 1997 has served as restaurant critic for Boston Magazine. He was educated at Yale, and came to The Atlantic Monthly in 1981. He is the recipient of three James Beard Journalism Awards, including the MFK Fisher Distinguished Writing Award.

The CHANGING FACE OF GLOBAL FINANCE: Can America's Capital Markets Compete? The Atlantic Day of Ideas

Saturday, November 18, 2006, 10 a.m.

Changes in the national regulatory environment, in financial-reporting rules, and in the associated hazard of liability the so-called litigation time-bomb are said to be burdening America?s capital markets and placing them at a worsening disadvantage with respect to overseas competitors. Is this true? If it is, how widely will the effects be felt  Will this affect large and small companies alike? Above all, if America's competitiveness as the capital markets further decreases, what will that mean for the country?

A Town Hall discussion moderated by Atlantic Senior Editor Clive Crook.

Panelists:
William McDonough
John Coffee
Richard Cavanagh

This event is co-presented by The Atlantic and sponsored by Ernst & Young

About Clive Cook

Clive Crook is a Senior Editor of The Atlantic. In addition to his work for the magazine, he writes a column for National Journal and serves as chief editorial adviser to David Bradley, the chairman of Atlantic Media Group. He was formerly on the staff of The Economist, latterly from 1993 to 2005 as deputy editor. A graduate of Oxford and the London School of Economics, he has served as a consultant to the World Bank and worked as an official in the British Treasury. He lives in Washington, D.C.

BEHIND THE SCENES WITH PBS: The Emotional Animal The Atlantic Day of Ideas

Saturday, November 18, 2006, 10 a.m.

PBS and The Atlantic will host a screening on the program ?Nature,? followed by a discussion moderated by Scott Stossel on how animal emotional intelligence mirrors that of humans.

Panelists:
Fred Kaufman
Lynn Sherr
Vicki Croke
Linda Koebner
Eugene Linden

This event is co-presented by The Atlantic and sponsored by PBS

About Fred Kaufman

Three-time Emmy Award-winner Fred Kaufman has been executive producer of Nature since 1991 and has worked on the series since its premiere in 1982. Many of Nature?s most memorable presentations have been produced under Kaufman?s stewardship, including the highly acclaimed miniseries Africa (2001) and Deep Jungle (2005). In 2006, The Queen of Trees won broadcasting?s highest honor, the Peabody Award, and, at the Banff World Television Festival, the NHK President?s Prize, which recognizes excellence in high definition programming. Other noteworthy programs have included In the Wild:Orangutans with Julia Roberts(1998) which won a prestigious Genesis Award for Outstanding PBS Documentary, and the Emmy Award-winning The Urban Elephant (2000). Kaufman has forged major international co-production partnerships with the BBC and National Geographic Television, among other organizations.

About Lynn Sherr

Award-winning journalist Lynn Sherr has been a correspondent for ABC?s 20/20 since 1986, covering a wide range of stories while specializing in investigative reports and subjects relating to women?s issues and social change. Her 1994 report on anorexia won broadcasting?s highest honor, the George Foster Peabody Award. Sherr is the author of Tall Blondes, a book about giraffes on which the ?Nature? episode is based. Her other books include America the Beautiful: The Stirring, True Story About Our Nation?s Favorite Song, and Failure Is Impossible: Susan B. Anthony in Her Own Words. Sherr?s most recent publication is Outside the Box: A Memoir. She has written articles on wildlife and other subjects for many periodicals, including The New York Times. In 2000, Sherr traveled to India to report on midnight in Bombay for the ABC NEWS? award-winning Millennium Special. Starting in 1978, she served as a floor reporter for ABC NEWS at every Republican and Democratic nominating convention and received an Emmy Award in 1980 for her election coverage. Sherr also covered the NASA space shuttle program from its inception in 1981 through the Challenger explosion in 1986. Prior to joining ABC NEWS, Sherr was a reporter for WNET in New York and WETA in Washington, D.C., both public television stations, and a reporter for The Associated Press and Conde Nast Publications.

About Vicki Croke

For 20 years, writer Vicki Croke has been covering animal issues in print and broadcast media, traveling to East Africa, the Galapagos Islands, the Arctic Circle, Tasmania, and Madagascar. ?Animal Beat,? her column on wildlife and pet issues, ran for 14 years in The Boston Globe. As a contributor to NPR?s environment show Living on Earth, she has reported on topics ranging from gorilla conservation to a coyote vasectomy. Her book, The Lady and the Panda, the true story of the intrepid American who brought the first live giant panda out of China in 1936, is being adapted for film by Michael Cunningham for Focus Features. Croke?s other books include The Modern Ark: Zoos Past, Present and Future and Animal ER. Croke has written for numerous publications including Time, The Washington Post and Popular Science and continues to report on animal issues for NECN television in Boston.

About Linda Koebner

An advocate for animal welfare throughout her career, Linda Koebner has been captivated by chimpanzees since early childhood. In 1974, she became co-director of the first project to provide a new, more naturalistic home to nine chimpanzees who had spent years in biomedical research. Koebner worked with a consortium of organizations to pass the CHIMP Act (Chimpanzee Health Improvement Maintenance and Protection) in 2000. She served as Executive Director of Chimp Haven, a sanctuary for retired laboratory and entertainment chimpanzees, during its formative years. She has also worked with The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, The Humane Society of the United States, The National Anti-Vivisection Society, and various laboratories to realize her dream of a sanctuary for chimpanzees. In addition, she worked for the Children's Museum of Manhattan, the New York Zoological Society, authored several books, and created her own company, Wildlife Writers & Resources, to promote the appreciation of other species.

About Eugene Linden

Eugene Linden is an award-winning journalist and the author of eight books. He has written about animals and animal intelligence since the 1970s in books and articles, including cover stories in Time and National Geographic. His books on animal intelligence include, Apes, Men and Language, Silent Partners, The Parrot's Lament, and The Octopus and the Orangutan. In his other writing, Linden has focused on global environmental issues. His most recent book is Winds of Change: Climate, Weather, and the Destruction of Civilizations. Apart from his writing, Linden has consulted for the U.S. State Department and the U.N. Development Program. In 2001, Yale University named Linden a Poynter Fellow in recognition of his writing on the environment.

About Scott Stossel

Scott Stossel, managing editor of The Atlantic, has been associated with the magazine since 1992 when, shortly after graduating from Harvard, he joined the staff and helped to launch The Atlantic Online. In 1996, he moved to The American Prospect where, over the course of seven years, he served as associate editor, executive editor, and culture editor. He rejoined the Atlantic staff in 2002 and oversaw the magazine's 2005 move to Washington from Boston. Along with writing and editing, Scott has taught courses in the American Studies Department at Trinity College.

THE WORLD IN 2050: China the Superpower? The Atlantic Day of Ideas

Saturday, November 18, 2006, 9 a.m.

Is China'cs rise as the global superpower inevitable? What will be the socio-economic and political implications of China's emergence for the world in 2050? What will America and the world be like in China's economic shadow?

A Town Hall discussion moderated by James Bennet.

Panelists:
Robert Kaplan
Minxin Pei
Jonathan Spence
Arthur Waldron

This event is co-presented by The Atlantic and sponsored by British Airways

About James Bennet

James Bennet is The Atlantic's newly appointed editor, joining the publication in early 2006. Before joining the Atlantic staff, Bennet was the Jerusalem bureau chief for The New York Times. During his three years in Israel, his coverage of the Middle East conflict was widely acclaimed for its balance and sensitivity. Bennet is a graduate of Yale University who began his journalism career at The Washington Monthly. Prior to his work in Jerusalem, he served as the Times' White House correspondent and was preparing to join its Beijing bureau when he was offered the Atlantic editorship.

About Robert D. Kaplan

Robert D. Kaplan is a national correspondent for The Atlantic and the Class of 1960 Distinguished Visiting Professor in National Security at the United States Naval Academy, Annapolis. He is the best-selling author of eleven books on international affairs and travel, translated into many languages. His latest work is Imperial Grunts: The American Military on the Ground. In the 1980s, Kaplan was the first American writer to warn in print about a future war in the Balkans. Besides The Atlantic, Kaplan's essays have appeared on the editorial pages of The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and The Washington Post. He has been a consultant to the U. S. Army's Special Forces Regiment, the U. S. Air Force, and the U. S. Marines. Kaplan has delivered the Secretary of State's Open Forum Lecture at the U. S. State Department. He has reported from 100 countries.

About Minxin Pei

Minxin Pei is a senior associate and director of the China Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace in Washington DC. He received his Ph.D. in political science from Harvard University in 1991 and taught politics at Princeton University from 1992 to 1998. His main interest is U.S.-China relations, the development of democratic political systems, and Chinese politics. He is the author of From Reform to Revolution: The Demise of Communism in China and the Soviet Union and China's Trapped Transition: The Limits of Developmental Autocracy. His research has been published in Foreign Policy, Foreign Affairs, The National Interest, Modern China, China Quarterly, Journal of Democracy and many edited books. His op-eds have appeared in the Financial Times, New York Times, Washington Post, Christian Science Monitor, and other major newspapers.

About Jonathan Spence

Jonathan Spence, Sterling Professor of History at Yale University, teaches in the field of Chinese history from around 1600 to the present, and on Western images of China since the middle ages. His books include The Death of Woman Wang; The Memory Palace of Matteo Ricci; The Question of Hu; Chinese Roundabout: Essays on History and Culture; The Gate of Heavenly Peace: The Chinese and Their Revolution 1895-1980; The Chan's Great Continent: China in Western Minds; and God's Chinese Son. His research often takes him to many Chinese Universities.

About Arthur Waldron

Arthur Waldron is an academic, a historian, a China scholar, and a China hawk. He and many of his ideas have been associated with the so-called Blue Team, an informal group that presses for China policy that emphasizes military deterrence over diplomatic and economic engagement. Waldron is the University of Pennsylvania's Lauder Professor of International Relations, as well as vice president of the International Assessment and Strategy Center. He has ties to numerous other think tanks, including the Center for Security Policy, the Project for the New American Century, the Jamestown Foundation, and the Foreign Policy Research Institute.

SAVING THE WORLD: KATI MARTON in conversation with SAMANTHA POWER

Thursday, November 16, 2006, 6 p.m.

The Great Escape: Nine Jews Who Fled Hitler and Changed the World

Nine extraordinary men, each celebrated for individual achievements, were part of a unique group who grew up in a time and place that will never come again the few dazzling years of lively café  life during Budapest's Golden Age before the darkness closed in.

One step ahead of Hitler's terror state, these nine men were driven from Hungary by anti-Semitism, fled to the West, especially to the United States, and changed the world.

They were four scientists, Edward Teller, John von Neumann, Leo Szilard, and Eugene Wigner, who each helped usher in the nuclear age and the computer; two major Hollywood movie icons, Michael Curtiz, who directed Casablanca, and Alexander Korda, who produced The Third Man; two photographers, Robert Capa, one of the world's greatest war photographers, and Andre Kertesz, an important influence on photojournalism and the art of photography; and writer, Arthur Koestler, author of Darkness at Noon, one of the most important anti-communist novel of the century.

Join Pulitzer Prize winning author and human rights advocate, Samantha Power, in a discussion with Kati Marton, author of The Great Escape: Nine Jews Who Fled Hitler and Changed the World.

About Kati Marton

Kati Marton served as an overseas bureau chief for ABC News and a news correspondent for NPR. She was the host of a PBS-Radio weekly broadcast America and the World and a reporter for PBS-TV, Atlantic Monthly, London Times, and New Republic. She is the Hungarian-born daughter of Jewish refugees from communist persecution and author of Hidden Power Presidential Marriages that Shaped our History, Wallenberg, the Polk Conspiracy, A Death in Jerusalem, and a novel, An American Woman. She lives in New York City with her husband, Richard Holbrooke.

About Samantha Power

Samantha Power is The Anna Lindh Professor of Practice of Global Leadership and Public Policy at Harvard's John F. Kennedy School of Government and author of A Problem from Hell: America and the Age of Genocide, a 2003 Pulitzer Prize winner. Power was the founding executive director of the Carr Center for Human Rights Policy. She has reported for U.S. News and World Report, The Boston Globe, and The Economist. Power is co-editor of Realizing Human Rights: Moving from Inspiration to Impact. She spent 2005-06 working for Senator Barack Obama and is writing a biography of the UN's Sergio Vieira de Mello.

DAVID NASAW & VARTAN GREGORIAN: On Andrew Carnegie

Friday, November 10, 2006, 6 p.m.

Born the son of an impoverished Scottish linen weaver, Andrew Carnegie pulled himself up from bobbin boy in a cotton factory to founder of Carnegie Steel, and one of the richest men in the world. He spent the rest of his life giving away the fortune he had accumulated and crusading for international peace. For all that he accomplished and came to represent to the American public a wildly successful business and capitalist, a self-educated writer, peace activist, philanthropist, man of letters, lover of culture, and unabashed enthusiast for American democracy and capitalism Carnegie has remained an enigma.

In his new biography, David Nasaw, with a trove of new material, explains how Carnegie made his early fortune and what prompted him to give it all away, how he was drawn into the campaign first against American involvement in the Spanish-American War and then for international peace, and how he used his friendships with presidents and prime ministers to try to pull the world back from the brink of disaster. Vartan Gregorian, President of the Carnegie Corporation, and former President of the NYPL, discusses Andrew Carnegie's complex legacy with David Nasaw, author of Andrew Carnegie, the story of one of America's greatest businessmen, and the philanthropist who gave it all away.

This event is co-presented by the Center for the Humanities at the CUNY Graduate Center.

About David Nasaw

David Nasaw is the author of the The Chief: The Life of William Randolph Hearst, winner of the Bancroft Prize for History, the J. Anthony Lukas Book Prize, the Ambassador Book Prize for Biography, and finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award. His new book is Andrew Carnegie. He is currently a distinguished professor of history and Director of the Center for the Humanities at the City University of New York Graduate Center.

About Vartan Gregorian

Vartan Gregorian is president of Carnegie Corporation of New York, a grant-making institution founded by Andrew Carnegie in 1911. He has also served as president of Brown University and The New York Public Library. Gregorian has taught at San Francisco State College, the University of California at Los Angeles, and the University of Texas at Austin. He was provost at the University of Pennsylvania. Gregorian is author of The Road To Home: My Life And Times, Islam: A Mosaic, Not A Monolith, and The Emergence of Modern Afghanistan, 1880-1946. In 2004, President Bush awarded him the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation?s highest civil award.

SPY Magazine: The Funny Years, the 20th Anniversary with GRAYDON CARTER, KURT ANDERSEN, GEORGE KALOGERAKIS & DAVID CARR

Friday, November 3, 2006, 6 p.m.

SPY: The Funny Years
A Loving, 20th Anniversary Interrogation

During its heyday, from 1986 through 1993, Spy magazine broke important ground in journalism and design, defining smartness for its generation. It was a once-in-a-lifetime creation that shaped the zeitgeist and succeeded (for a while) against all odds.

In the process, it introduced into the currency Separated at Birth, Naked City, The Fine Print, Log-Rolling in Our Time, Blurb-o-Mat, those hilarious (and now ubiquitous) charts, the inside stories on The New York Times and Hollywood, plus countless arresting covers, investigative features, and entertaining deconstructions of pretty much everyone who was anyone during the late 80s and early  90s an often grisly but always entertaining cast of churlish dwarf billionaires, beaver-faced moguls, bull-whip-wielding uber-agents, knobby-kneed socialites and, of course, short-fingered vulgarians.

To celebrate the 20th anniversary of Spy's creation and the publication of Spy: The Funny Years, the definitive anthology containing some of the magazine?s funniest and most creative work along with the ultimate insiders? account of how it all came to be, the book?s authors?founding editors Graydon Carter and Kurt Andersen, and original writer and editor George Kalogerakis will be on hand for a discussion with New York Times media columnist and reporter David Carr.

About Graydon Carter

Graydon Carter has been editor of Vanity Fair since 1992 and has won every award a magazine editor can win. He also produced the Emmy and Peabody-award winning documentary 9/11 and The Kid Stays in the Picture?about the legendary producer Robert Evans. Prior to joining Vanity Fair, Mr. Carter was editor of The New York Observer and a staff writer for Life and Time.

About Kurt Andersen

Kurt Andersen is author of Turn of the Century, and his second novel, Heyday, will be published in March. He is host and co-creator of the public radio show Studio 360, and writes a column for New York magazine. Previously, he edited New York, co-founded Inside.com, and was a critic and columnist for The New Yorker and Time. He has also created television programs, and written screenplays and an off-Broadway revue.

About George Kalogerakis

George Kalogerakis, a deputy editor of Spy at its launch and the magazine's senior writer for several years, is now the deputy op-ed editor of The New York Times. He has worked as a writer and editor for many magazines, including Vanity Fair, Vogue, New York, and Travel + Leisure.

About David Carr

David Carr writes a column on media issues for the Monday Business section of The New York Times and also covers popular culture for the newspaper. During the season, he writes a daily blog about the Academy Awards as the Carpetbagger. He has been a contributing writer for The Atlantic Monthly and New York Magazine, and Inside.com. Before that, he lived in middle places and came to know New York only through Spy. He was disappointed when he moved here and found out that Spy often engaged in parody, but has since recovered.

The Library at Night: ALBERTO MANGUEL in conversation with Paul Holdengräber

Monday, October 30, 2006, 6 p.m.

Ever wonder what happens when the last person leaves the library, darkness descends, and the books begin to breathe? In the tradition of A History of Reading, Alberto Manguel's The Library at Night is the captivating story of how libraries embody the memories of individuals and whole cultures. Magically, he takes us to libraries when the lights go out, when books are rightful owners and the reader is the interloper. When all daytime order is upended, one book calls to another across the shelves, and new alliances are created across time and space.

He takes us to the "memory libraries" of prisoners, the libraries of banned books, the "imaginary libraries" of books not yet written, like those carried by Count Dracula and Frankenstein's monster, the libraries of the famous, the doomed, the personal along with the libraries that have preserved freedom of thought in the face of tyranny like the librarian in charge of the Scholem Aleichem Library in Poland, who, after the Nazis began their destruction of the Jewish libraries, carried away as many books as he could, or like the children's library at Auschwitz.

Drawing on sources as wide-ranging as his childhood bookshelves in Buenos Aires, and the complete libraries of the Internet, Alberto Manguel wanders from Egypt and Greece to the Arab world, from China and Rome to Google telling of his astonishment at the variety, beauty and persistence of our efforts to shape the world and our lives, most notably through something almost as old as reading itself: libraries.

"In my foolhardly youth, when my friends were dreaming of heroic deeds in the realms of engineering and law, finance and national politics, I dreamt of becoming a librarian. Sloth and an ill-restrained fondness for travel decided otherwise. Now, however, having reached the age of fifty-six (which, according to Dostoevsky in The Idiot, is "the age at which real life can be rightly said to begin"), I've returned to that early ideal and,?though I cannot properly call myself a librarian, I live among ever-increasing bookshelves whose limits begin to blur or coincide with the house itself. The title of this book should have been Voyage around My Room. Regrettably, over two centuries ago, the notorious Xavier de Maistre got there first."

Alberto Manguel, The Library at Night

This event is co-presented by Instituto Cervantes. 

About Alberto Manguel

Alberto Manguel, an essayist, novelist, editor, translator, and anthologist, was born and educated in Buenos Aires, Argentina. He is the author of several books including Reading Pictures: A History of Love and Hate and A History of Reading. He has published and discussed fine examples of Latin American ghost stories, European classic tales, and American science fiction in such works as The Dictionary of Imaginary Places, Black Water: The Book of Fantastic Literature, and Other Fires: Short Fiction by Latin-American Women. He now lives in France, where he was named an Officer of the Order of Arts and Letters.

About Paul Holdengräber

Paul Holdengräber is the Director of Public Programs - now known as "LIVE from the NYPL" - for The Research Libraries of The New York Public Library.

ANDY BOROWITZ

Thursday, October 26, 2006, 7 p.m.

The Borowitz Report on the Future

In a totally improvised and spontaneous program, cybersatirist Andy Borowitz will answer the audience's questions about what the future holds for current events, pop culture, sports, business, and Paris Hilton, with the guarantee that he will be at least as accurate as the New York Post. Borowitz, who enlightens the world daily with his Internet column, The Borowitz Report, has made a career of writing headlines for news stories that haven't happened yet:

****ANN COULTER SPONTANEOUSLY COMBUSTS*****

***********IRAQIS FAIL TO LOVE RAYMOND*****

****BUSH STATES OPPOSITION TO GAY DIVORCE****

to name just three.

Bring your most daring and world-stopping questions that even your personal astrologer can't answer, and Andy will ripen the possibilities that you and a roomful of intimate buddies will be the best informed gadflies on the planet.

About Andy Borowitz

Humorist, author, television personality and film actor Andy Borowitz has been called a Swiftian satirist by The Wall Street Journal. He is the recipient of the 2004 Angele Gingras Humor Award, the first-ever award given to a humorist by the National Press Club and in 2002 he was inducted into the Friars Club of New York. Millions watch him every week on CNN's American Morning, where he is on 90 Second Pop and Gimme a Minute. He is author of the daily Internet column, The Borowitz Report, Who Moved My Soap? The CEO's Guide to Surviving in Prison, The Borowitz Report: The Big Book of Shockers and National Public Radio listeners know him as the satirical commentator on Weekend Edition Sunday. His writing appears in The New Yorker, The New York Times, The Los Angeles Times, Vanity Fair and at Newsweek.com. He created the hit television series The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air and produced the film Pleasantville. He has appeared in several films including Melinda and Melinda, Marie and Bruce, and Fired. His new book is The Republican Playbook.

JAN MORRIS AT 80 in conversation with Paul Holdengräber

Monday, October 23, 2006, 7 p.m.

AROUND THE WORLD IN 50 YEARS
To celebrate the 80th birthday of Jan Morris, Paul Holdengräber will conversationally ramble with the writer through some of the matters that have preoccupied her during a long life. For example: patriotism, dislike of concerts, Norwegian Forest Cats, the practice of travel, marmalade vs grape jelly, Venice vs Trieste, connoisseurship (ugh!), intellectualism (yuk!), 57 years of a curious friendship, 53 years of visiting NY, the British Empire, the superiority of small countries (notably Wales), journalism at Mount Everest, death, glories and agonies of family life, the power of kindness. And anything else that comes into their minds.

About Jan Morris

Jan Morris was born in 1926 to a Welsh father and an English mother, and lived and wrote in the persona of James Morris before completing a change of sexual role in 1972. After four years in the British Army, and a degree course at Oxford, she spent five years as a foreign correspondent for the London Times, and five more for the old Manchester Guardian, before leaving journalism for the writing of books. She has published some 40 works of history, travel, autobiography and fiction, is a Commander of the Order of the British Empire and lives in Wales with her lifelong friend Elizabeth, in close touch with their four children and seven grandchildren.

About Paul Holdengräber

Paul Holdengräber is the Director of Public Programs - now known as "LIVE from the NYPL" - for The Research Libraries of The New York Public Library.

Celebrating SPECTACLE : A conversation with DAVID ROCKWELL, Julie Taymor, Simon Doonan. John Hockenberry, Instigator

Friday, October 20, 2006, 7 p.m.

As an architect and set designer, David Rockwell creates immersive environments imbued with a sense of theater. He pays attention to texture, craft, and narrative, as well as new materials and technology. According to Business Week,"He always builds a bit of magic into his spaces....to Rockwell, designing an environment means shaping an experience that lasts in the memory."

Now, in his new book SPECTACLE, in collaboration with noted designer Bruce Mau, Rockwell provides the first exploration of the phenomenon and history of public performance and spectacular man-made events around the world. From Burning Man in the Nevada desert to the Holi Festival in India to the American-born NASCAR, he offers an unprecedented tour of over 60 far-flung and fleeting, beautiful and bizarre events and considers what it is about these shared, live experiences that transforms not only the way we see the world, but also how we connect with each other.

Through stunning visuals and behind-the-scenes interviews with spectacle producers such as Julie Taymor, Simon Doonan, Steve Wynn, and Quincy Jones, Rockwell shows how an empty stadium, an open field, a busy urban thoroughfare and even individuals can be transformed by spectacle. For a brief moment, people, place and atmosphere are electrified, and the ordinary becomes extraordinary.

Join a conversation instigated by John Hockenberry with David Rockwell, Julie Taymor, and Simon Doonan, as they discuss the idea of spectacle in our contemporary world. Together they will explore what it means, in an age of technology, for our society to have the desire to participate in shared experiences. Prior to the conversation, witness a presentation of images offering a visual tour of the world's most amazing public events projected around the dome of the Celeste Bartos Forum.

About David Rockwell

David Rockwell is the founder and CEO of the Rockwell Group, an architecture and design practice. Based in NYC, Rockwell Group specializes in hospitality, cultural, theater and film design. Recent commissions include the JetBlue Airways terminal at JFK Airport; the Elinor Bunin Center at Lincoln Center; Town restaurant and Chambers hotel (NYC); W New York and W Union Square (NYC); the Academy Awards Kodak Theater (LA); the Broadway musicals Hairspray, Dirty Rotten Scoundrels, and Phantom of the Opera (Las Vegas); and numerous internationally located restaurants. Pleasure: The Architecture and Design of Rockwell Group was published in 2002. His new book is SPECTACLE with Bruce Mau.

About Simon Doonan

Simon Doonan is the author of Wacky Chicks and Confessions of a Window Dresser. In addition to his role as creative director of Barneys New York, Simon writes the "Simon Says" column for The New York Observer. He frequently contributes observations and opinions to myriad other publications and television shows. He is a regular commentator on VH1, the Trio network, and Full Frontal Fashion.

About Julie Taymor

Julie Taymor has received numerous awards for her work as a director and for costume design on and off Broadway. She received two Tony Awards for The Lion King and five Tony nominations for Juan Darin: A Carnival Mass. Other directorial work includes The Flying Dutchman, The Magic Flute, and her first opera, Oedipus Rex. Taymor recently premiered an original opera, Grendel, composed by Elliot Goldenthal, at the Los Angeles Opera and subsequently at the Lincoln Center Festival. Her films include Fool's Fire, Titus, and Frida, which received five Academy Award Nominations and two Oscars. Taymor's next project, Across the Universe, a movie-musical, includes more than 30 Beatles songs and will be released Spring 2007. The film stars Evan Rachel Wood and features performances by Bono, Joe Cocker, Eddie Izzard and Salma Hayek.

About John Hockenberry

John Hockenberry is a veteran journalist in every facet of the profession, from broadcast radio to news magazine television to print as well as being a pioneer in online content. Hockenberry is also an advocate and spokesman for the rights of the disabled. He joined NBC as a correspondent for Dateline NBC in 1996 after a fifteen-year career in broadcast news at both National Public Radio and ABC News. Hockenberry's reporting for Dateline NBC earned him three Emmys, an Edward R Murrow award and a Casey Medal. Hockenberry is a contributing editor for WIRED Magazine and METROPOLIS. He is the author of the novel A River Out Of Eden, and Moving Violations: War Zones, Wheelchairs and Declarations of Independence, a memoir of life with a disability.

ADAM GOPNIK in conversation with Paul Holdengräber

Wednesday, October 11, 2006, 7 p.m.

WHERE IS NEW YORK?

After five years in Paris, Adam Gopnik moved his family back to New York. His children could now go through "The Children's Gate," the actual entrance to Central Park at 76th Street that opens onto a playground. This entrance is for Gopnik a symbol of the "civilization of childhood" in New York, one which he wanted his children to enter and embrace. At first, the new New York seemed safer and shinier than ever. But not long after their return, the fabric of living became frayed by 9/11.

The subject of the last five years worth of his essays all turn on these shadows and lights: on raising two children in New York in a time of fear, and how fear is transmuted into hope, and hope even into joy, by their presence.

In his new book, Through the Children's Gate: A Home in New York, Gopnik's extended urban family of teachers, coaches, therapists, adversaries, and friends put his new home under the spell of the sort of characters only the city's unique civilization could produce, but with the long shadow of mortality hanging over all. Yet " Shadows," he writes, "are all we have to show us the shapes that light can make."

In conversation with Paul Holdengräber, he will discuss and argue about the centrality of childhood to our ideas of meaning, the fact or myth of a "Post 9/11" New York, and the latest adventures of Charlie Ravioli, the imaginary New York friend who is always too busy to play with you.

About Adam Gopnik

Adam Gopnik has been writing for The New Yorker since 1986. In 2000, he began writing the New York Journal, about the culture and daily life of New York City. He previously spent five years in Paris, writing his Paris Journal, a similar column about manners and mores in Paris. Gopnik's work has been awarded three National Magazine Awards and the George Polk Award for Magazine Reporting. Gopnik is the author of Paris to the Moon and The King in the Window. His new book, published by Knopf, is Through the Children's Gate: A Home in New York.

About Paul Holdengräber

Paul Holdengräber is the Director of Public Programs - now known as "LIVE from the NYPL" - for The Research Libraries of The New York Public Library.

THE MOTH, YADDO & LIVE from the NYPL Celebrate The Moth @ 10!

Friday, October 6, 2006, 6:30 p.m.

ART ATTACK:

Stories about Wrestling the Muse

No artist is pleased. There is no satisfaction whatever at any time. There is only a queer, divine dissatisfaction, a blessed unrest that keeps us marching and makes us more alive than the others."

Martha Graham

I put my heart and my soul into my work, and have lost my mind in the process. —Vincent Van Gogh

In honor of its tenth season premiere, The Moth, New York's Hip Urban Storytelling group, together with Yaddo, the legendary artists retreat, and LIVE from The New York Public Library—come together for a very special Friday Moth Night. This is the fourth time The Moth has been LIVE from the NYPL!

The NYPL is home to the Yaddo Archive, an amazing collection of material that will form the core of a forthcoming exhibition at the NYPL, and serve as the inspiration for some LIVE from the NYPL events.

To celebrate The Moth's tenth season premiere, five storytellers (all of whom have spent time inside Yaddo's walls) will explore artistic invention, from the germ of an idea to the full blown fever of the creative process. Join us and our host, Jonathan Ames, for this celebration of LIVE from the NYPL, The Moth, The Mansion, and "the blessed unrest."

6:30 pm Doors Open

7:30 pm Stories Start on Stage

Co-presented by the MOTH & Yaddo. 

Sponsored by TNT

Storytellers:

Jonathan Ames
Carl Bernstein
Jonathan Santlofer
Anna Schuleit
and others!

Host: Jonathan Ames

Violin: Megan Weeder

Curators: Paul Holdengräber and Yaddo

Artistic Director: Catherine Burns

Executive and Creative Director: Lea Thau

Senior Producer: Sarah Austin Jenness

Curator and Producer: Jenifer Hixson

Assistant Producer: Katie Miller

About the Storytellers:

JONATHAN AMES (Host) is the author of I Love You More Than You Know, I Pass Like Night, The Extra Man, What's Not To Love?, My Less Than Secret Life, and Wake Up, Sir! He is the editor of Sexual Metamorphosis: Anthology of Transsexual Memoirs and he is the winner of a Guggenheim Fellowship. He is recurring guest on The Late Show with David Letterman, and his comedic memoir What's Not to Love? was filmed as a TV pilot for the Showtime network. His novels The Extra Man and Wake Up, Sir! are in development as films with screenplays by Mr. Ames. www.jonathanames.com

CARL BERNSTEIN, along with Bob Woodward, broke the story of the Watergate break-in and consequently helped bring about the resignation of President Nixon. For his role in breaking the scandal, Bernstein received many awards; his work helped earn the Post a Pulitzer Prize for Public Service in 1973. Bernstein has worked as a senior correspondent for the ABC network, taught at New York University, and is currently a contributor to Vanity Fair magazine. He authored two books with Woodward: All the President's Men, which detailed the successes and failures of their journalistic efforts against the backdrop of the unfolding scandal, and The Final Days, a recounting of the concluding months of the Nixon presidency. He co-authored the book His Holiness: John Paul II & the History of Our Time with Marco Politi, and published a memoir, Loyalties. Following the May 2005 revelation of the identity of Deep Throat, Bernstein contributed to Woodward's book The Secret Man. He is currently working on a biography of Hillary Rodham Clinton, to be published by Knopf next year.

JONATHAN SANTLOFER is the author of The Death Artist, Color Blind and The Killing Art, and has had his novels translated into more than 16 languages. He is the recipient of two National Endowment for the Arts Painting Grants, has had over 200 exhibitions in the US and abroad, and has had his artwork written about and reviewed in The NY Times, Artforum, Art In America, Arts, and Interview. His most recent exhibition was with the Pavel Zoubok Gallery in New York City. His forthcoming novel, Anatomy of Fear, a combination thriller and graphic novel, will be published in April 2007 by HarperCollins.

ANNA SCHULEIT is a painter and installation artist whose large-scale installations revolve around the remembrance of public sites and modern ruins. She is a graduate of the Rhode Island School of Design and the recipient of fellowships from the Banff Centre, the Blue Mountain Center, and the MacDowell Colony. Her work has been supported by numerous agencies and organizations, including the Animating Democracy Initiative of Americans for the Arts, the Massachusetts Department of Mental Health, the Elizabeth Greenshields Foundation, and the Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities. She recently served as a public art consultant for "Arts for Transit" of the MTA in New York City. She is currently a fellow at the Radcliffe Institute and the recipient of a 2006 MacArthur Fellowship.

About the Violinist:

Megan Weeder has a Bachelor's degree in Violin Performance and Ethnomusicology from Indiana University and a Master's degree in Ethnomusicology through the School of Oriental and African Studies at the University of London. Since 1992, she has been performing and recording music from the Arab world, Central Asia, Iran and Turkey, in ensembles such as Saba and the Salaam Middle Eastern Music and Dance Ensemble. She has also performed American traditional music, Javanese Gamelan, and flamenco guitar. Megain is one of the founders for the ECHO World Music Institute in Bloomington, Indiana, and served as their administrative director for two years. She currently studies with Bassam Saba and performs and records with groups ranging from traditional Arabic to rock and roll. www.meganweeder.com.

About Yaddo:

Yaddo is an artists? community established in Saratoga Springs, New York, in 1900 by the financier Spencer Trask and his poet wife, Katrina, to offer creative artists the rare gift of a supportive environment with uninterrupted time to think, experiment, and create. Over the years, Yaddo has welcomed more than 5,500 artists working in one or more of the following media: choreography, film, literature, musical composition, painting, performance art, photography, printmaking, sculpture, and video. Yaddo now annually welcomes 200 artists for residencies lasting up to two months. www.yaddo.org.

About The MOTH

The Moth, a New York based non-profit arts organization dedicated to the art of storytelling, has been called ?New York?s hottest and hippest literary ticket? by The Wall Street Journal. Celebrating its 10th season, The Moth features simple, old-fashioned storytelling on thoroughly modern themes by wildly divergent raconteurs. Past storytellers at The Moth have included Malcolm Gladwell, Ethan Hawke, Erica Jong, Frank McCourt, Moby, and George Plimpton as well as a VooDoo Priestess, an astronaut and hundreds more. In addition to its main stage, The Moth conducts two other programs—The Moth StorySLAM, a competitive storytelling event, and The Moth Outreach Program, which conducts workshops for underserved teens and adults in rehabilitation programs. The Moth has sold out every show since it?s inception in 1997, and is launching its first U.S. tour on October 12 at UCLA Live in Los Angeles. www.themoth.org.

BILL MOYERS in conversation with Bill McKibben: Welcome to Doomsday

Tuesday, October 3, 2006, 7 p.m.

The influence of the evangelical Christian right on the Bush administration has had a mostly unnoticed impact on America's environmental policy. While some take God?s granting of dominion over the earth to man as a call to good stewardship of our planet, many evangelicals distrust science and disdain environmental protections. They live in anticipation of one event: the Rapture, when Christ will return to cleanse the earth while the true believers are transported to heaven. For those who believe that the Rapture and the destruction of the world are imminent, there is no need to be concerned about saving the planet from environmental catastrophe.

In his new book, Welcome to Doomsday, Bill Moyers makes a passionate call to save the planet from the forces not only of greed and exploitation but from those who associate its destruction with a spiritual apocalypse.

This event is co-sponsored by

About Bill Moyers

Bill Moyers is the former host of NOW with Bill Moyers on PBS. He was one of the organizers of the Peace Corps, spokesperson for President Lyndon Johnson, publisher of Newsday, senior correspondent for CBS News, and producer of many of public television?s groundbreaking series. He is the winner of more than thirty Emmy Awards, and the author of the bestselling books Listening to America, A World of Ideas, and Healing and the Mind.

About Bill McKibben

Bill McKibben is a scholar in environmental studies at Middlebury College. He is the author of many books about the environment, including The End of Nature and Age of Missing Information. He is a former staff writer for the New Yorker and his work frequently appears in the Atlantic, the New York Review of Books, the New York Times, Harpers, and Outside, among others.

ROBERT FRANK in conversation with Howard Norman: Beirut

Saturday, September 30, 2006, 7 p.m.

At 80 Robert Frank, the renowned photographer of The Americans, will make a rare personal appearance and reveal the ideas and work behind his new book, Come Again, a facsimile reprint of a sketch book he had originally made in Beirut during 1991. At that time, Frank was invited to Beirut on a commission to photograph the devastated downtown of the city following the end of the Lebanese civil war. Together with the work of five other photographers, his work was included in a book, Beirut City Centre in 1992. But alongside his work on this commission, he made numerous Polaroids of the destroyed city that he stored in his studio on his return home. Many years later he has reconsidered these images by publishing a previously unseen artist's book that offers insight into the early stages of the artist's experimentation with the Polaroid medium.

This event is co-presented by Steidl and the Culture Project Impact Festival.

About Robert Frank

Robert Frank was born in Zurich, Switzerland and went to the United States in 1947. He is best known for his seminal book The Americans, first published in 1958, which gave rise to a distinct new art form in the photo-book, and his experimental film Pull My Daisy. His other important projects include the book Black White and Things, the book The Lines of My Hand, and the film Cocksucker Blues.

About Howard Norman

Howard Norman has twice been shortlisted for The National Book Award in fiction and is the recipient of the Lannan Award in fiction. He has received a fellowship from the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation and three fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts. His novels include The Bird Artist, The Museum Guard, and The Hauting of L. His newest novel, Devotion, is published by Houghton Mifflin in Feburary 2007. His memoirs include In Fond Remembrance Of Me and My Famous Evening, which includes a chapter about Robert Frank. Next year Norman will retrace Matsuo Basho's Narrow Road to the Deep North? in Japan for National Geographic.

FRANK RICH in conversation with Paul Holdengräber

Saturday, September 30, 2006, 8 a.m.

Frank Rich has been a critic, editorialist and columnist for over 30 years. In an excerpt from his new book, The Greatest Story Ever Sold: The Decline and Fall of Truth from 9/11 to Katrina, he states 9/11 was a new morning in America a wake-up call, you'd think, for a country that had been habituated to peace and prosperity and had had the luxury of devoting several years to obsessing about a president's seamy sex life. But whatever else 9/11 was, we can see now that it was the beginning of a new national narrative a compelling and often persuasive story that was told by the president of the United States and his administration to mobilize a shell-shocked country desperate to be led.

Rich states that what the citizens did not know as they rallied behind this president as he went to war, was that the administration's highest priority would be not to vanquish Al Qaeda but to consolidate its own power at any cost. It was a mission that could be accomplished only by a propaganda presidency in which reality was steadily replaced by a scenario of its own invention. In this conversation, Rich illuminates the White House's disturbing love affair with truthiness and the ways in which a bungled war, a seemingly obscure Washington leak, and a devastating hurricane at long last revealed the man behind the curtain, as well as the story that had been so effectively sold to the nation as God-given patriotic fact.

This event is co-presented by Culture Project Impact Festival.

About Frank Rich

Frank Rich became a New York Times Op-Ed columnist in 1994 after serving for thirteen years as the newspaper's chief drama critic. He has written about culture and politics for many other publications and was on the staffs of Time, the New York Post, and New Times magazine after starting his career as a founding editor of The Richmond Mercury, a weekly newspaper, in the early 1970s. He is the author of Ghost Light, a childhood memoir; Hot Seat: Theater Criticism for ?The New York Times,? 1980?1993; and The Theatre Art of Boris Aronson, coauthored with Lisa Aronson.

About Paul Holdengräber

Paul Holdengräber is the Director of Public Programs - now known as "LIVE from the NYPL" - for The Research Libraries of The New York Public Library.

CHRIS ANDERSON in conversation with Lawrence Lessig

Thursday, September 28, 2006, 7 p.m.

The Rise and Fall of the Blockbuster

The twentieth century was the heyday of the hit, when the extraordinary power of broadcast technologies unified countries and even the globe. Mass markets ruled and bestsellers dominated the shelves, snapping societies into cultural lockstep. But then came the Web and the power of digital distribution, with infinite shelf space, near-zero costs and an appetite for a million niches. What will happen to our culture and economy as we shift from blockbusters to "nichebusters" and everything finds an audience, no matter how small?

Join Chris Anderson, author of the new book The Long Tail: Why the Future of Business Is Selling Less of More, and Lawrence Lessig, Stanford law professor and author of Free Culture: How Big Media Uses Technology and the Law to Lock Down Culture and Control Creativity, as they debate the cultural consequences of our shift into the "Long Tail" of demand and what still stands in the way of truly unlimited choice.

This event is co-presented by 

About Chris Anderson

Chris Anderson is editor-in-chief of Wired Magazine. Previously, he was at The Economist, where he served as U.S. Business Editor, Asia Business Editor; and Technology Editor. Anderson's media career began at two science journals, Nature and Science. Prior to that he worked as a researcher at Los Alamos National Laboratory's meson physics facility and served as research assistant to the Chief Scientist of the Department of Transportation. He is the author of book, The Long Tail: Why the Future of Business Is Selling Less of More, and runs a blog on the subject at www.thelongtail.com.

About Lawrence Lessig

Lawrence Lessig is a Professor of Law at Stanford Law School and founder of the school's Center for Internet and Society. Prior to joining the Stanford faculty, he was the Berkman Professor of Law at Harvard Law School, and a Professor at the University of Chicago. He is the author of Free Culture: How Big Media Uses Technology and the Law to Lock Down Culture and Control Creativity, The Future of Ideas and Code and Other Laws of Cyberspace. He is also a columnist for WIRED Magazine.

SAM HARRIS in conversation with Oliver McTernan

Monday, September 25, 2006, 7 p.m.

According to a recent Pew poll, three-quarters of all Americans believe the Bible is God's word. To Steve Paulson of Salon.com, Numbers like that make an outspoken atheist like Sam Harris seem either foolhardy or uncommonly brave. In his first book, The End of Faith, Harris argued that much of the violence in the world today comes directly from people willing to live and die by sacred religious texts. The response to this book was thousands of letters from Christians excoriating Harris for not believing in God. Letter to A Christian Nation is his reply. In this open letter, Harris challenges the beliefs that form the core of fundamentalist Christianity and the influence that faith has on public life in our nation.

Oliver McTernan, author and the director of Forward Thinking, an NGO involved in conflict resolution in the U.K. and Middle East, is also a broadcaster for the BBC, and a former priest. He will challenge the claims set forth in Harris's new book, Letter to A Christian Nation. Is Harris a secular fundamentalist reflecting the mindset he rejects? Does his American perspective have relevance elsewhere in the world? Like the religious right, is he an anti-pluralist?

This event is co-presented by Culture Project Impact Festival. 

About Sam Harris

Sam Harris is the author of The End of Faith: Religion, Terror, and the Future of Reason which won the 2005 PEN Award for Nonfiction. He is now completing his doctorate in neuroscience, studying the neural basis of belief, disbelief, and uncertainty with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Harris makes regular appearances on television and radio to discuss the danger that religion now poses to modern societies. His new book is Letter to a Christian Nation.

About Oliver McTernan

Oliver McTernan is director and co-founder of Forward Thinking, a British-based organization that works to prevent and resolve conflict at a national and global level. He broadcasts regularly on the BBC and writes freelance for the Guardian and the Times. For 30 years he worked as a Parish Priest in Islington and Notting Hill in Central London. In 2004 he organized and directed the NATO sponsored research workshop on the Roots of Terrorism that was held in Prague. His latest book is Violence in God's Name: Religion in an Age of Conflict. He is currently editing The Roots of Contemporary Terrorism to be published by NATO at the end of 2006.

CAMERON SINCLAIR, KATE STOHR & CYNTHIA BARTON with John Hockenberry, moderator

Wednesday, September 20, 2006, 7 p.m.

DESIGN LIKE YOU GIVE A DAMN

As we enter the 21st century the field of architecture is at a crossroads. From Hurricane Katrina to the war in Iraq, large-scale urbanization, disaster and conflict has destabilized not only our political structures but also the built environment prompting many to question the building practices of the past. Is the role of the architect to create the signature monuments that define and exalt our cultural and economic values? Or, is there an alternative path to building in the world today, one that engages people where they live and work and recognizes that sustainability is not a luxury but a necessity?

Join Cameron Sinclair, Kate Stohr and Cynthia Barton of Architecture for Humanity, editors of the book Design Like You Give a Damn, along with cultural commentator John Hockenberry as they discuss how a new breed of designers is responding to humanitarian crises and rethinking the social and economic future of the more than two billion people currently surviving in sub-standard living conditions.

This event is co-presented by

About Cameron Sinclair

Cameron Sinclair is the co-founder and executive director of Architecture for Humanity. Sinclair was trained as an architect at the University of Westminster and at the Bartlett School of Architecture, University College London and then worked for 6 years as a project architect in New York City. He recently served as the Cass Gilbert Visiting Professor at the University of Minnesota. He has spoken at numerous conferences on sustainable development and post disaster reconstruction and has made guest appearances on BBC World Service, CNN International and National Public Radio. In 2005 he was awarded the RISD/Target Emerging Designer of the Year and the Lewis Mumford Award for Peace. Most recently, Sinclair was named as one of three winners of the 2006 TED Prize, which honors visionaries from any field who have shown they can "positively impact life on this planet."

About Kate Stohr

Kate Stohr is the co-founder of Architecture for Humanity. She brings a background in daily news and a strong understanding of urban issues, planning and infrastructure to the organization. As managing director she has developed and led a number of design and building initiatives, including the deployment of transitional housing to Grenada and the organization's response to Hurricane Katrina on the Gulf Coast of America. She served as the executive editor of Design Like You Give A Damn, the first book to bring the best of humanitarian design to the printed page. Along with Cameron Sinclair, she is the recipient of the 2006 Wired Rave Award and the 2005 Index Design to Improve Life Award for Community.

About Cynthia Barton

Cynthia Barton is a Director of AFHny, the New York City chapter of Architecture for Humanity. She is an architect and writer who focuses on the intersection of architecture, the environment, and public health. Her international work includes research as a Fulbright fellow in Bangladesh and project management on Shigeru Ban's earthquake relief housing project in Gujarat, India, as well as an AIA/ Academy of Architecture for Health fellowship on space for mental health care as part of a disaster relief operation. She holds a Master in Architecture from Yale University and is a contributing editor of Design Like You Give a Damn.

About John Hockenberry

John Hockenberry is a veteran journalist in every facet of the profession, from broadcast radio to news magazine television to print as well as being a pioneer in online content. Hockenberry is also an advocate and spokesman for the rights of the disabled. He joined NBC as a correspondent for Dateline NBC in 1996 after a fifteen-year career in broadcast news at both National Public Radio and ABC News. Hockenberry's reporting for Dateline NBC earned him three Emmys, an Edward R Murrow award and a Casey Medal. Hockenberry is a contributing editor for WIRED Magazine and METROPOLIS. He is the author of the novel A River Out Of Eden, and Moving Violations: War Zones, Wheelchairs and Declarations of Independence, a memoir of life with a disability.

INVISIBLE SYMPOSIUM: European Dream Festival with CHARLES GRODIN, master of ceremonies

Tuesday, September 19, 2006, 7 p.m.

OPENING GALA

To kick off the first ever European Dream Festival, a six-week celebration of the most vibrant and innovative artistic productions from a new Europe, The Invisible Symposium will transform the Celeste Bartos Forum into the scene of a classic symposium in antiquity. Charles Grodin will be the master of ceremonies. The idea of the Invisible Symposium originated with the Hungarian art movement, The European School. In 1948, their members circulated a questionnaire to artists, writers and philosophers asking them to define the relationship of art and politics to artists, writers and philosophers.

To make the invisible visible in this new symposium, American actors will do a staged reading from the collected texts of over a dozen contemporary European intellectuals to render their intriguing and sometimes disturbing reflections on the present dilemmas facing the European Union. Here are some of the questions that were posed to these European intellectuals:

Do you have a European identity? What does it mean for you?

Is it important to build a European mass culture or to combat American mass culture?

Is the European Union a political necessity, or has it any political advantages for your country

What are the driving forces of European unity and what is its future?

This event is co-sponsored by Altria and the Hungarian Cultural Center.

Curated by Jakab Orsos, Director of the Hungarian Cultural Center in New York, and Paul Holdengraeber, Director of Public Programs at NYPL. Texts edited by Roger Conover, Executive Editor, The MIT Press.

Participants:
Metin Arditi (Switzerland)
H?l?ne Cixous (France)
Leonidas Donskis (Lithuania)
Agnes Heller (Hungary)
J?rg Lau (Germany)
Dusan Mitana (Slovakia)
Gerard Mortier (Belgium)
Peter Nadas (Hungary)
Dan Perjovschi (Romania)
Marieke Sanders-ten Holte (The Netherlands)
Marek Tamm (Estonia)
Mart Valjataga (Estonia)
Mitja Velikonja (Slovenia)
Vittorio Zucconi (Italy)

About Charles Grodin

Charles Grodin is a movie star, an author, a playwright, a director, a screenwriter, an Emmy Award winning writer, a commentator, a celebrated raconteur, and a successful advocate. He is credited with gaining clemency for four women imprisoned for several years under New York?s draconian Rockefeller drug laws. For this he recently received the William Kunstler award for racial justice. He has also received the Help Hero award in appreciation of his humanitarian efforts on behalf of the homeless. He is the author of the book, I Like It Better When You?re Funny and the screenplay Movers and Shakers. Grodin was a commentator for 60 Minutes II and had his own show on CNBC and MSNBC. Also a playwright, he wrote The Right Kind of People and Price of Fame. As a theater director and actor on Broadway, he directed Lovers and Other Strangers and starred in Same Time Next Year. Grodin is best known as a movie actor in such movies as The Heartbreak Kid, Midnight Run, and the Beethoven movies. Currently Grodin is a commentator for CBS News radio. He is working on a book Getting Smarter? (learning from our mistakes), a compilation of mistakes and what people have learned from them from such luminaries as Robert Redford, Paul Newman, and Judge Judy. His play, The Prosecution of Brandon Hein, will be presented at the Culture Project in New York this fall. In early 2007 Mr. Grodin returns to the screen starring in Fast Track.

E.O. WILSON in conversation with Ira Flatow

Thursday, September 14, 2006, 7 p.m.

Whether we believe that nature arose through evolution or by divine creation, one thing is certain: our earth, the Creation itself, is in desperate need of protection from the wanton destruction wrought by human hands. NPR's host of Talk Of The Nation: Science Friday, Ira Flatow, will talk with Professor E.O. Wilson about his new book, The Creation: An Appeal to Save Life on Earth,written in the form of a letter to a Southern Baptist minister. Wilson seeks to attract not only his customary audience of science and nature lovers but also Evangelicals, whom he believes will be important allies in the struggle to preserve our planet. The stories he tells from his scientific adventures are both enlightening and humbling: amphibians like salamanders, frogs, and toads are the proverbial canaries in the mine and most vulnerable because they breathe through their skins. These early harbingers of disaster are being wiped out at an alarming rate. If humans were to disappear from Earth, the planet would soon regenerate. However, if insects were to disappear, the world would inevitably collapse into a state of famine and chaos.

Join this conversation about how we can come together with our differing religious and scientific viewpoints to ensure our continued survival as a planet.

About Edward O. Wilson

Edward O. Wilson is a Professor and Curator of Entomology at the Museum of Comparative Zoology at Harvard University. He has conducted field research throughout the world and written more than twenty books, including The Ants, The Diversity of Life, and On Human Nature. His awards include two Pulitzer Prizes and the National Medal of Science. In his books, The Diversity of Life, Biophilia, and The Naturalist, he sounds a powerful alarm about the calamitous loss of species diversity.

About Ira Flatow

Ira Flatow is a veteran National Public Radio science correspondent and TV journalist who hosts NPR's Talk Of The Nation: Science Friday. Ira Flatow is also founder and president of TalkingScience, an organization dedicated to creating media projects that make science user friendly and host of the PBS series Big Ideas. He is author of They All Laughed ... From Light Bulbs to Lasers: The Fascinating Stories Behind the Great Inventions That Have Changed Our Lives, and Rainbows, Curve Balls and Other Wonders of the Natural World Explained.

TIMOTHY GREENFIELD-SANDERS with Andr? Leon Talley, Tim Gunn & Martha Nelson

Tuesday, September 12, 2006, 7 p.m.

From ever-thicker fashion magazines like Vogue to hit TV shows like Project Runway, the fashion industry is hotter than ever. During Olympus Fashion Week, join photographer Timothy Greenfield-Sanders, Vogue's André Leon Talley, PEOPLE Group Editor Martha Nelson, and Tim Gunn of Parsons and Project Runway for a provocative discussion about America's insatiable appetite for fashion and their personal adventures along the way.

For the past three seasons, Timothy Greenfield-Sanders has been backstage at Bryant Park photographing the famous faces who assemble for New York's biannual Olympus Fashion Week. In a studio built especially for him, Timothy has captured an intimate moment with the designers, models, journalists, celebrities, and other A-listers who help define contemporary fashion. With his new book, Look: Portraits Backstage at Olympus Fashion Week, no one has had a better vantage point to record the passion, politics, and creativity that meld together within the fashion world.

This event is co-sponsored by

About Timothy Greenfield-Sanders

Timothy Greenfield-Sanders has achieved critical acclaim photographing world leaders and major cultural figures, including presidents, writers, artists, actors, and musicians. He is a contributing photographer at Vanity Fair and his photographs appear regularly in publications worldwide. Greenfield-Sanders' feature documentary, Lou Reed: Rock and Roll Heart, aired on the PBS series American Masters and won a Grammy Award in 1999. His portraits are in numerous museum collections, including The Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Whitney Museum of American Art, and the National Portrait Gallery. In 2003, his series of 700 art-world portraits was accepted into the permanent collection of the Museum of Modern Art. His book, XXX: 30 Porn-Star Portraits, was the subject of an HBO documentary and a segment on 60 Minutes. Greenfield-Sanders' work will be on view in a one-person show at Museo di Capodimonte in Naples beginning in October 2006.

About André Leon Talley

André Leon Talley joined Vogue as Fashion News Director in 1983 and then served as Creative Director until 1995. Prior to returning to Vogue in 1998, as Editor at Large, Talley lived in Paris. Talley's first job with Andy Warhol began his career in the world of high style. At The Metropolitan Museum of Art's Costume Institute, Talley's work with fashion's most legendary authority and his mentor, Diana Vreeland, served to confirm his interest in fashion. He details their relationship in his autobiography, A.L.T.: A Memoir. His latest book, A.L.T. 365+, is his first art monograph which chronicles over 365 days of his life, offering an inside look at the people and places he encounters in his work and travels. He is the 2003 recipient of the CFDA's Eugenia Sheppard Award for Excellence in Fashion Journalism, on the board of The Savannah College of Art and Design, and an active member of The Abyssinian Baptist Church in Harlem.

About Tim Gunn

Tim Gunn is Chair of the Department of Fashion Design at Parsons The New School for Design. Gunn has lectured widely on fashion and his interviews have appeared in publications as diverse as Time and Newsweek, Crain's New York Business, Martha Stewart Living, Elle Magazine and Women's Wear Daily, and his television interviews have appeared on CBS, NBC, and the Metro Channel. For Bravo's Project Runway, he guides contestants who compete for the opportunity to show in the Bryant Park tents during New York's Olympus Fashion Week.

About Martha Nelson

Martha Nelson was named editor, PEOPLE Group in 2006, overseeing all media properties for the PEOPLE franchise. Earlier this year she was recognized as "Editor of the Year" by AdWeek for her work as PEOPLE's managing editor. Nelson was the founding editor of In Style. Prior to that she was an assistant managing editor at PEOPLE, worked on the launch team of PEOPLE's Australian sister publication, Who Weekly, and was editor-in-chief of Savvy and Women's Sports & Fitness. In 2005 Nelson was named one of the media industry's "21 Most Intriguing" by Media Industry News and for two consecutive years in 2004/2005, Forbes magazine featured her as one of the "World's Most Powerful Women." Nelson was invited to speak at the White House Conference on Missing and Exploited Children and was honored by the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children for her work to elevate awareness on the issues surrounding missing children.

JOEL MEYEROWITZ: Aftermath: World Trade Center Archive

Monday, September 11, 2006, 7 p.m.

September 11 Remembrance Features Ground Zero Photographs by Joel Meyerowitz

LIVE from the NYPL Event Commemorates Fifth Anniversary of Attacks.

To commemorate the 5th anniversary of 9/11, a selection of Joel Meyerowitz's photographs from Aftermath: World Trade Center Archive will be projected in the Reading Room with the photographer retelling excerpts from the 100 stories about his experiences at the site. The event will also feature a one-day exhibition of the work including an oversized 8?x22? panorama of the Ground Zero site. The event will close with a performance of Barber's Adagio for Strings by the Julliard Chamber Orchestra.

After September 11, 2001, Ground Zero was classified as a crime scene and only those directly involved in the recovery were allowed inside. With the help from the Museum of the City of New York and sympathetic public officials, award-winning photographer Joel Meyerowitz obtained unlimited access. For nine months Meyerowitz photographed the pile, as the WTC came to be known. Influenced by Walker Evans and Dorothea Lange's work for the Farm Security Administration during the Depression, Meyerowitz knew that if he didn't make a photographic record of the unprecedented recovery effort, there would be no history.

I was making photographs for everyone who didn't have access to the site, said Joel Meyerowitz. I wanted to communicate what it felt like to be in there as well as what it looked like: to show the pile's incredible intricacy and visceral power. I could provide a window for everyone else who wanted to be there, too to help, or to grieve, or simply to try to understand what had happened to our city.

Lead sponsor for the event

All photographs printed and generously donated by 

About Joel Meyerowitz

Joel Meyerowitz's photographic work has appeared in over 350 exhibitions in museums and galleries around the world. He is the author of 14 other books, including Bystander: The History of Street Photography and Tuscany: Inside the Light. In 1998 he produced and directed his first film, POP, an intimate diary of a three-week road trip he made with his son, Sasha, and his father, Hy. Within a few days of the 9/11 attacks, Meyerowitz began to create an archive of the destruction and recovery at Ground Zero that now numbers more than 8,000 images and will be available for research, exhibition, and publication at museums in New York and Washington, DC. The Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs (ECA) of the U.S. State Department, the Museum of the City of New York and Meyerowitz created a special exhibition of images from the archive that traveled to more than 200 cities in 60 countries. His book, Aftermath: World Trade Center Archive (Phaidon), contains 450 of Meyerowitz's World Trade Center Archive photographs.

Slate at 10: ONLINE MEDIA AND THE FUTURE OF JOURNALISM

Thursday, June 22, 2006, 6:30 p.m.

CELEBRATING THE 10TH ANNIVERSARY OF Slate

Malcolm Gladwell, Arianna Huffington, Norm Pearlstine, Jacob Weisberg & Michael Kinsley, moderator

When Slate launched in June 1996, online media was little more than a novelty. News now breaks first on the web; internet news sites are primary information sources for young (and not-so-young) readers. Online magazines like Slate and the blogs are driving and at times helping to shape political debate. Print newspapers and magazines are being reborn online. Podcasts, webcasts, texting, RSS feeds, and new technologies are continuing to change what journalism is and how we consume it.

In this forum, veterans of online journalism and observers will wrestle with the profound changes taking place in journalism.

Has online journalism weakened reporting and ethical standards?

Has the news cycle gotten too fast for its own good?

Will traditional media manage to survive in the age of new media?

This event is co-sponsored by 

About Malcolm Gladwell:

Malcolm Gladwell has been a staff writer with The New Yorker since 1996. From 1987 to 1996, he was a reporter with the Washington Post, where he covered business, science, and then served as the newspaper's New York City bureau chief. He is the author of two books, The Tipping Point: How Little Things Make a Big Difference and Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking.

About Arianna Huffington:

Arianna Huffington is a nationally syndicated columnist, author of eleven books and co-founder and editor of the HuffingtonPost.com. She is also co-host of Left, Right & Center, public radio's popular political roundtable program. Her weekly commentary is syndicated in newspapers across the country by Tribune Media Services. Her many books include On Becoming Fearless...in Love, Work, and Life, Maria Callas: The Woman Behind the Legend, Picasso: Creator and Destroyer, Pigs at the Trough: How Corporate Greed and Political Corruption are Undermining America, and Fanatics and Fools: The Game Plan for Winning Back America.

About Michael Kinsley:

Michael Kinsley is the founding editor of Slate. He currently writes a column for both Slate and the Washington Post. He founded Slate in 1995 and was its editor for six years. For two decades he was associated with The New Republic, as its editor and as author of its "TRB From Washington" column. He was editor-in-chief of Harper's, editorial and opinion editor of the Los Angeles Times, editor of the American Survey department at The Economist, and managing editor of The Washington Monthly. He co-hosted CNN's Crossfire for six years, and also moderated William F. Buckley's Firing Line debates. Kinsley has written regular columns for The New Republic, Time, The Wall Street Journal and the Times of London.

About Norman Pearlstine:

Norman Pearlstine was editor-in-chief of Time, Inc., the world's largest magazine publisher, from 1995 until the end of 2005. Mr. Pearlstine oversaw the editorial content of TIME, Life, Fortune, Sports Illustrated, People, In Style, Money, and Entertainment Weekly to name a few. In 2004, the American Society of Magazine Editors gave him its Lifetime Achievement Award and inducted him into the Magazine Editors? Hall of Fame. Prior to joining Time Inc., Mr. Pearlstine worked with Dow Jones & Company, except for a two-year period when he was an executive editor at Forbes magazine. He was also managing and then executive editor of The Wall Street Journal. He is currently a senior advisor to Time, Inc., and is working on a book, Off the Record: The Use and Misuse of Anonymous Sources, to be published in 2007.

About Jacob Weisberg:

Jacob Weisberg is editor of Slate. He was previously Slate's chief political correspondent and the originator of its "Strange Bedfellow" and "Ballot Box" columns. Before joining Slate in 1996, he wrote about politics for magazines including the New Republic, Newsweek, and New York Magazine, and has written as well for Vanity Fair and the New York Times Magazine. He is the co-author, with Robert E. Rubin, of In an Uncertain World. He is also the author of In Defense of Government, the 2000 eBook The Road to Chadville, and the Bushisms series.

KITCHEN SECRETS: BILL BUFORD with Mario Batali and Anthony Bourdain

Wednesday, June 21, 2006, 7 p.m.

For three frenetic years of trials and errors, disappointments and triumphs, author and New Yorker writer, Bill Buford was kitchen slave to chef Mario Batali at his three-star NYC restaurant, Babbo. As Buford worked his way up the Babbo ladder from kitchen bitch  to line cook, his relationship with the larger-than-life Batali grew while he learned his life story through kitchen encounters and after-work all-nighters. Buford's immersion into the art of butchery in Northern Italy, preparing game in London, and making handmade pasta at an Italian hillside trattoria, become an illuminating exploration of why food matters.

Join Bill Buford, author of the kitchen memoir Heat, as he plunges into the life of Mario Batali and his rise to extraculinary fame, along with Anthony Bourdain, executive chef at Brasserie Les Halles, as they discuss the dao, the worldview and work ethic of the professional. Fear not: you will learn once and for all how to sauce pasta properly, what's good about shanks and hooves as Buford & Batali & Bourdain regale us with many kitchen secrets.

About Bill Buford

Bill Buford is a staff writer for The New Yorker after having been fiction editor for eight years. He was the founding editor of Granta magazine and was also the publisher of Granta books. He is the author of Among the Thugs, a highly personal nonfiction account of crowd violence and British soccer hooliganism that has been translated into ten languages. In 2003, he won the James Beard Journalism Award for Magazine Feature Writing Without Recipes for ?The Secret of Excess. His new book is Heat: An Amateur's Adventures as a Kitchen Slave, Line Cook, Pasta Maker, and Apprentice to a Dante-Quoting Butcher in Tuscany.

About Mario Batali:

Mario Batali creates magic in his many NYC hotspots, the flagship being Babbo Ristorante e Enoteca in Greenwich Village. Babbo was honored as ?The Best New Restaurant of 1998? by The James Beard Foundation, and Ruth Reichl at the New York Times hailed it with three stars. Mario?s other restaurants are Lupa, Esca, Otto Enoteca Pizzeria, Casa Mono, Bar Jam?n, and Del Posto along with Italian Wine Merchants. Mario apprenticed with London?s legendary chef Marco Pierre White and spent three years of intense culinary training in the Northern Italian village of Borgo Capanne. Mario hosts two Food Network programs, "Molto Mario" and "Ciao America" and has authored Simple Italian Food, Mario Batali Holiday Food, The Babbo Cookbook, and Molto Italiano: 327 Simple Italian Recipes. Most recently, Mario created the first ever cookbook for NASCAR fans, Mario Tailgates NASCAR Style.

About Anthony Bourdain
Anthony Bourdain graduated from the Culinary Institute of America before running kitchens at NYC's Supper Club, One Fifth Avenue and Sullivan?s. Bourdain has written three crime novels, Bone in the Throat, Gone Bamboo, and The Bobby Gold Stories. His expos of New York restaurants, Don't Eat Before Reading This, in The New Yorker led to his memoir Kitchen Confidential: Adventures in the Culinary Underbelly. For the Food Network Bourdain travelled the world in search of ?extreme cuisine? resulting in the book A Cook's Tour: In Search of the Perfect Meal. Les Halles Cookbook is Bourdain's guide to the strategies and techniques of classic bistro cooking. Bourdain's travel and food series, "Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations," airs on the Travel Channel. Kitchen Confidential, a comedy series based on Bourdain's memoir, premiered on FOX in 2005. He is currently the executive chef at Brasserie Les Halles and his new book is The Nasty Bits.

JOHN UPDIKE in conversation with Jeffrey Goldberg

Thursday, June 15, 2006, 7 p.m.

John Updike lives in rural Massachusetts but he happened to be in New York on September 11, 2001 to witness the collapse of the Twin Towers from a top-floor apartment across the East River. "It was about the worst thing I'd ever seen," Updike said. Terrible though it was, "it's never struck me as something that couldn't be written about." His latest novel is a thriller about a "sympathetic terrorist," in the author's own words. Updike grew interested in how religious zealotry works on the mind of an otherwise decent young man. The main character in Terrorist is an 18-year-old Muslim convert who falls under the sway of a radical cleric in his gritty New Jersey hometown and gets caught up in a 9/11-type plot. Updike, a church goer, says religion can be both a threat to society and a solace to individuals. "I'm saying, it can be a very dangerous thing. On the other hand to have no faith is to live in an almost intolerably bleak universe. In any event I don't tend to push mottoes in my books. I try to illuminate, as best I can, sides of a puzzle."

Join John Updike for an evening of conversation with Jeffrey Goldberg, of the The New Yorker. Goldberg is the author of the forthcoming Prisoners: A Muslim and a Jew Across the Middle East Divide, to be published this October. He has spent a great deal of time over the past ten years with the leaders of Hamas, Hezbollah, the Taliban, al-Quaeda and Islamic Jihad.

Updike and Goldberg will talk about terrorism, the rise of apocalyptic and fundamental theology, and the role of fiction in the shadow of 9/11.

About John Updike

John Updike is a much-admired short-story writer as well as a novelist. Updike's most famous works are his Rabbit series? Rabbit, Run, Rabbit Redux, Rabbit Is Rich, Rabbit At Rest, and Rabbit, Remembered. Rabbit is Rich and Rabbit at Rest both won Pulitzer Prizes for Updike. Describing his subject as "the American small town, Protestant middle class", Updike is well known for his careful craftsmanship and prolific writing, having published 21 novels and more than a dozen short story collections as well as poetry, literary criticism and children's books. Hundreds of his stories, reviews and poems have appeared in The New Yorker since the 1950s. His works often explore sex, faith, death, and their interrelationship. Besides the Pulitzer, his novels have won the National Book Award, the American Book Award, the National Book Critics Circle Award, the Rosenthal Award, and the Howells Medal. Still Looking: Essays on American Art, his second collection of art reviews, came out last year.

His new book is Terrorist: A Novel.

About Jeffrey Goldberg

Jeffrey Goldberg is the Washington correspondent of The New Yorker. He is the recipient of the 2003 National Magazine Award for Reporting for his coverage of Islamic terrorism and of the Anti-Defamation League Daniel Pearl Prize in 2005. Previously, he was a writer for The New York Times Magazine, New York Magazine, Forward, Jerusalem Post and The Washington Post. In 2001, Goldberg was appointed the Syrkin Fellow in Letters of the Jerusalem Foundation and was appointed in 2002 to be a public policy scholar at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars.

A Tribute to OCTAVIA E. BUTLER

Monday, June 5, 2006, 7 p.m.

Writers and friends of Octavia E. Butler, who died in February, 2006, will gather to pay tribute to this internationally known science fiction writer whose evocative, often troubling, novels explore far-reaching issues of race, sex, power and, ultimately, what it means to be human. Publisher Dan Simon, actor Avery Brooks, publisher and editor Max Rodriguez, writer Harlan Ellison, Professor Sandra Govan, literary agent Merrilee Heifetz, poet Sonia Sanchez, writer Samuel R. Delany and special musical guests will honor Ms. Butler with reminiscence, music and readings from her work.

This event is co-sponsored by Seven Stories Press

About Octavia E. Butler

Octavia E. Butler is the author of eleven novels, including Kindred, Dawn, Parable of the Sower, and, most recently, Fledgling (2005), and one collection of short fiction, Bloodchild. Butler received a MacArthur Foundation "genius" grant, science fiction's highest honors--the Nebula Award and the Hugo Award--and numerous other literary awards.

According to her New York Times obituary, throughout Ms. Butler's career, the news media made much of the fact that she was an African-American woman writing science fiction, traditionally a white male bastion. But in interviews and in her work itself she left no doubt that her background equipped her spectacularly well to portray life in hostile dystopias where the odds of survival can be almost insurmountable. "I'm black, I'm solitary, I've always been an outsider," The Los Angeles Times quoted Ms. Butler as saying in 1998. Set in time periods ranging from the historical past to the distant future, Ms. Butler's books were known for their controlled economy of language and for their strong, believable protagonists, many of them black women. One of Ms. Butler's best-known novels, Kindred, told the story of a modern-day black woman who must travel back to the antebellum South to save the life of a white, slaveholding ancestor and, in so doing, save her own. Frequently assigned in black-studies courses, the book was rooted in the experience of the author's mother, who worked as a maid. "I didn't like seeing her go through back doors," Ms. Butler once told Publishers Weekly. "If my mother hadn't put up with all those humiliations, I wouldn't have eaten very well or lived very comfortably. So I wanted to write a novel that would make others feel the history: the pain and fear that black people have had to live through in order to endure." In an interview with The New York Times, Ms. Butler explained the deep appropriateness of her chosen genre as a vehicle for social commentary. "We are a naturally hierarchical species," she said. "When I say these things in my novels, sure I make up the aliens and all of that, but I don't make up the essential human character."

About Dan Simon

Simon is publisher of Seven Stories Press, Octavia's publisher for over 10 years.

About Avery Brooks

Brooks is the actor perhaps best known as Cmdr. Benjamin Lafayette Sisko on Star Trek: Deep Space Nine.

About Max Rodriquez

Rodriguez is editor of QBR: The Black Book Review, and one of the last people to interview Octavia.

About Harlan Ellison

Harlan Ellison, a science fiction writer, was Octavia's first teacher at Clarion writing workshop and was a great champion of her work. He will be reading by remote.

About Sandra Govan

Govan is a professor of English at the University of North Carolina, Charlotte, with a specialty in American and African American literatures.

About Merrilee Heiftz

Heifetz is Octavia's longtime literary agent and executor of her literary estate.

About Sonia Sanchez

Sanchez is author of more than a dozen books of poetry, plays, and winner of several awards including those from the NEA, and a Pew Fellowship.

About Samuel R. Delany

Samuel R. Delany is an award-winning science fiction writer whose books include the novels Nova and Dhalgren, and the Hugo-award-winning autobiography, The Motion of Light in Water and, most recently, About Writing.

REPORTING (From the Loser's Locker Room and Elsewhere): DAVID REMNICK in conversation with Paul Holdengräber

Wednesday, May 31, 2006, 7 p.m.

In his new collection, Reporting: Writings from The New Yorker, David Remnick, author, reporter, and editor of The New Yorker, profiles some of the most important, complex and, in many cases, reclusive people of our time.

The book includes character studies of figures as varied as Al Gore, Katharine Graham, Philip Roth, Mike Tyson, V clav Havel, Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn and Benjamin Netanyahu. "They are figures in the public arena," writes Remnick, "people who are in the midst of a crisis, passing out of one, or anticipating one on the horizon. They are, with some exceptions, people obsessed with altering the history of their era or recording it."

This conversation will present an opportunity for one of the country's most passionate journalists and editors to reveal why he finds himself particularly attracted to the "loser's lockers room," as well as address what reporting means to our culture at this moment in time, when the medium of print journalism is facing intense criticism and an uncertain future.

About David Remnick

David Remnick was named editor of The New Yorker in 1998. He joined The New Yorker after ten years at the Washington Post. He began his reporting career as a staff writer at the Post and became their Moscow correspondent. This experience formed the basis of his book on the former Soviet Union, Lenin's Tomb: The Last Days of the Soviet Empire, which received the Pulitzer Prize for nonfiction, the George Polk Award for excellence in journalism, and the NYPL Bernstein Book Award for Journalism. Other books include Resurrection about the struggle to build a Russian state from the ruins of the Soviet empire, Life Stories: Profiles from The New Yorker, and King of the World: Muhammad Ali and the Rise of an American Hero. Mr. Remnick is a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books, and his work has appeared in Vanity Fair, Esquire, and The New Republic, among other publications. Mr. Remnick has been a Visiting Fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations and has taught at Columbia and Princeton Universities. His new book is Reporting: Writings from The New Yorker.

About Paul Holdengräber

Paul Holdengräber is the Director of Public Programs - now known as "LIVE from the NYPL" - for The Research Libraries of The New York Public Library. At the NYPL his stated goal is to make the lions roar.

LISTENING IN: EAVESDROPPING AND THE NATIONAL SECURITY AGENCY Patrick Radden Keefe, James Risen, Adm. Bob Inman and Jeffrey Rosen, moderator

Monday, May 8, 2006, 7 p.m.

Recent revelations about a warrantless surveillance program administered by the National Security Agency raise troubling questions about the legality and efficacy of eavesdropping inside the United States, and the politics of secrecy and disclosure in an age of terrorism. Join James Risen, who just received a Pulitzer Prize for his New York Times scoop on secret domestic eavesdropping, and wrote State of War: The Secret History of the C.I.A. and the Bush Administration; Admiral Bob Inman, former Director of the NSA; and Patrick Radden Keefe, author of Chatter: Dispatches from the Secret World of Global Eavesdropping, for a candid, in-depth discussion of the high-tech side of American espionage, and the challenge of balancing an aggressive pursuit of terrorist cells inside America's borders with statutory and constitutional protections of privacy and civil liberties. The conversation will be moderated by Jeffrey Rosen, the legal affairs editor of The New Republic, a frequent contributor to NPR, and author of The Unwanted Gaze: The Destruction of Privacy in America and his just published The Most Democratic Branch: How the Courts Serve America

About Patrick Radden Keefe

Patrick Radden Keefe is a fellow at The Century Foundation and the author of CHATTER: Dispatches from the Secret World of Global Eavesdropping, which will be out in paperback this July. He is a former Fellow of the Cullman Center (2003-2004), the recipient of a 2006 Guggenheim Fellowship, and he writes about intelligence and national security issues for The New Yorker, The New York Times Magazine, The New York Review of Books, Slate, and other publications.

About James Risen

James Risen covers national security for The New York Times. He was a member of the team that won the Pulitzer Prize for explanatory reporting in 2002 for coverage of September 11 and terrorism, and he is the coauthor of Wrath of Angels and The Main Enemy: The Inside Story of the CIA's Final Showdown with the KGB. Mr. Risen is the author of the book State of War: The Secret History of the C.I.A. and the Bush Administration, which claims among other things that the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) ignored intelligence reports that Iraq had abandoned its nuclear arsenal plans 10 years ago. The publication of the book was expedited following the December 16, 2005 NSA leak story. Mr. Risen says this book is based on information from a variety of anonymous sources. The Department of Justice (DOJ) has begun an investigation of the sources of the national security leak involving NSA.

About Bob Inman

Admiral Bob Inman served as Director of Naval Intelligence, Vice Director of the Defense Intelligence Agency and Director of the National Security Agency. His last major position was as the Deputy Director of the Central Intelligence Agency, a post he held from 1981 to 1982. He has served on the Board of Directors of the prestigious Council on Foreign Relations. He was President Bill Clinton's first choice to succeed Les Aspin as Secretary of Defense in 1993; he withdrew from consideration. In 1987 Inman became an adjunct professor at the University of Texas at Austin and was appointed as a tenured professor holding the Lyndon B. Johnson Centennial Chair in National Policy in August 2001.

About Jeffrey Rosen

Jeffrey Rosen teaches constitutional law, criminal procedure, and the law of privacy at George Washington University Law School. He is also the legal affairs editor of The New Republic. His book, The Unwanted Gaze: The Destruction of Privacy in America was called by the New York Times ?the definitive text on privacy perils in the digital age.? Harvard Law Review called The Naked Crowd: Reclaiming Security and Freedom in an Anxious Age a ?thoughtful and engaging read ... [that] provides much-needed depth to the debate over balancing privacy and security in an age of terrorism.? His essays and book reviews have appeared in many publications, including the New York Times Magazine, the Atlantic Monthly, and the New Yorker, where he has been a staff writer. He is a frequent contributor to National Public Radio. His new book is The Most Democratic Branch: How the Courts Serve America.

AMARTYA SEN in conversation with Salman Rushdie PEN WORLD VOICES: The New York Festival of International Literature

Sunday, April 30, 2006, 6 p.m.

World Voices caps a rich day of programming at LIVE from the New York Public Library with a conversation between Festival Chair Salman Rushdie and his compatriot Amartya Sen, who will turn around the cultural telescope and question some cherished orthodoxies regarding multiculturalism, identity politics and liberal values.

This event is co-sponsored by PEN American Center in association with PEN World Voices, The New York Festival of International Literature.

About Amartya Sen

Amartya Sen was born in West Bengal in 1933. He received the Nobel Prize in Economics for his work in welfare economics in 1998 and the Bharat Ratna in 1999. Sen currently teaches at Harvard University. His most recent book is The Argumentative Indian.

About Salman Rushdie

Salman Rushdie was born in Bombay, India in 1947. He has served as Vice-President, Member Trustee-at-Large, and President of PEN American Center. He is the recipient of many awards, including the Booker Prize, the "Booker of Bookers," and the Whitbread Prize. His books include Midnight's Children, The Satanic Verses, Haroun and the Sea of Stories, Fury, and Shalimar the Clown.

ZADIE SMITH in conversation with Kurt Andersen PEN WORLD VOICES: The New York Festival of International Literature

Sunday, April 30, 2006, 3:30 p.m.

Zadie Smith's novels explore the territory shared by what are normally considered separate worlds: the personal and political, the academy and the "street," and the intersection of the increasingly multicultural societies of both England and America. She will discuss her work with novelist and commentator Kurt Andersen.

This event is co-sponsored by PEN American Center in association with PEN World Voices, The New York Festival of International Literature.

About Zadie Smith

Zadie Smith was born in North London in 1975. Her first novel, White Teeth, won the Guardian First Book Award, the Whitbread First Novel Award, the Commonwealth Writers Prize, and the Orange Prize for Fiction. Smith's other works include The Autograph Man and On Beauty.

About Kurt Andersen

Kurt Andersen is the author of several books, including the novel Turn of the Century. His second novel, Wonderstruck, will be published early next year. He is the host of Studio 360, the Peabody Award-winning public radio program about culture, and writes a column for New York magazine. He co-founded Spy magazine and Inside.com, and served as editor-in-chief of New York. He was previously a columnist for The New Yorker and the architecture and design critic for Time.

AYAAN HIRSI ALI in conversation with Philip Gourevitch PEN WORLD VOICES: The New York Festival of International Literature

Sunday, April 30, 2006, 1:45 p.m.

Despite death threats and intimidation, Ayaan Hirsi Ali has remained a vocal critic of the treatment of Muslim women. With Paris Review editor Philip Gourevitch, Ms. Hirsi Ali will discuss her new book, The Caged Virgin, and her experiences throughout Africa and as a Dutch MP.

This event is co-sponsored by PEN American Center in association with PEN World Voices, The New York Festival of International Literature.

Co-sponsored by The Paris Review.

About Ayaan Hirsi Ali

Ayaan Hirsi Ali was born in Somalia in 1969. After she was forced to flee Somalia with her family, Ayaan Hirsi Ali grew up in Saudi Arabia, Ethiopia, and Kenya. She now lives in The Netherlands. She is the author of De zoontjesfabriek (The Son Factory) and co-creator, with Theo van Gogh, of the film Submission.

About Philip Gourevitch

Philip Gourevitch was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1961. Editor of The Paris Review and staff writer at The New Yorker, Gourevitch is also the author of We Wish to Inform You That Tomorrow We Will Be Killed With Our Families: Stories From Rwanda and A Cold Case.

DUONG THU HUONG in conversation with Robert Stone PEN WORLD VOICES: The New York Festival of International Literature

Sunday, April 30, 2006, 12 noon

The first-ever U.S. appearance by Vietnam's foremost writer, who has been jailed and censored at home. Duong will be joined by distinguished novelist Robert Stone to discuss the writer's role in her society: the realities of war, censorship, and literature.

This event is co-sponsored by PEN American Center in association with PEN World Voices, The New York Festival of International Literature.

About Duong Thu Huong

Duong Thu Huong was born in the Thai Binh province of Vietnam in 1947. After she published her third novel, Nhung Thien Duong Mu (Paradise of the Blind), Duong Thu Huong's work was banned in Vietnam. She was then awarded the Prix Femina and the UNESCO Literature Prize in 1991. Her most recent book is No Man?s Land.

About Robert Stone

Robert Stone was born in Brooklyn, New York in 1937. He is the author of several critically acclaimed novels and collections, including National Book Award Winner Dog Soldiers and Pulitzer Prize Finalist Bear and His Daughter. His most recent book is Bay of Souls.

REVOLUTION: A User's Manual PEN WORLD VOICES: The New York Festival of International Literature

Saturday, April 29, 2006, 8 a.m.

Adam Michnik, Baltasar Garzón, Gioconda Belli, G. M. Tamás, and Christopher Hitchens, moderator

In a year of anniversaries recalling key moments in the last century's complicated romance with revolution (outbreak of the Spanish Civil War, suppression of the Hungarian uprising, Spain's dramatic moment of transition to democracy, and the birth of Solidarity), activist intellectuals reflect on the current status of our centuries-old faith in revolution and what its future may be.

This event is co-sponsored by PEN American Center in association with PEN World Voices, The New York Festival of International Literature.

Additional co-sponsors are the Instituto Cervantes, the Hungarian Cultural Center and the Consulate General of Spain.

About Adam Michnik

THE LIMITS OF TOLERANCE? Multiculturalism Now PEN WORLD VOICES: The New York Festival of International Literature

Friday, April 28, 2006, 6 p.m.

Necla Kelek, Dubravka Ugresic, Richard Rodriguez, Pascal Bruckner, and Kwame Anthony Appiah, moderator

In distinctive American and European variants, Multiculturalism is embattled from left and right as never before, even as both continents absorb unprecedented numbers of immigrants. Can the Enlightenment ideal of tolerance survive a resurgence of religious extremism A diverse group of American and European observers look at Multiculturalism today.

This event is co-sponsored by PEN American Center in association with PEN World Voices, The New York Festival of International Literature.

Additional co-sponsors are signandsight.com and the German Federal Cultural Foundation 

About Necla Kelek

Necla Kelek was born in Istanbul in 1957 and moved to Germany at the age of 10. Her books include Fremde Braut (The Foreign Bride) about arranged and forced marriages of Turkish migrants, and Die verlorenen S?hne (Lost Sons) about the socialization, violence, and the faith of Turkish-Muslim men.

About Dubravka Ugresic

Dubravka Ugresic was born in 1949 and is the author of several novels, short story collections, and essays. Her books The Ministry of Pain, Lend Me Your Character, Thank You For Not Reading, The Museum of Unconditional Surrender, The Culture of Lies, Have a Nice Day, In the Jaws of Life and Other Stories, and Fording the Stream of Consciousness have been translated in many European languages and received several international literary awards. Ugresic is currently based in Amsterdam.

About Richard Rodriguez

Richard Rodriguez was born in San Francisco in 1944. He is the author of Hunger of Memory and Days of Obligation: An Argument With My Mexican Father. He is also a contributing editor for Harper's and a commentator on NewsHour With Jim Lehrer.

About Pascal Bruckner

Pascal Bruckner was born on December 15, 1948 in Paris, France. In 1994, his novel Bitter Moon was made into a film by Roman Polanski. His other works include The Temptation of Innocence: Living in the Age of Entitlement, Parias, and The Tears of the White Man: Compassion as Contempt .

About Kwame Anthony Appiah

Kwame Anthony Appiah was born in London in 1954 and moved to Ghana as an infant. His books include In My Father's House, Color Conscious: The Political Morality of Race, and The Dictionary of Global Culture (co-edited with Henry Louis Gates Jr.). He has taught at Cambridge, Yale, Harvard, and Princeton.

WHO'S AFRAID OF IRAN? Azar Nafisi, Shirin Neshat, Roya Hakakian, Azadeh Moaveni, Soraya Broukhim, Sussan Deyhim and Lila Azam Zanganeh

Wednesday, April 19, 2006, 7 p.m.

As the media tracks Iran's growing nuclear arsenal and its potential as an ideological powder keg, the Islamic Republic looms larger than ever in the American imagination. Yet the country remains grossly misunderstood seen either as the third pillar of Bush's "axis of evil" or as a nation teeming with teens who clamor for democracy, Western-style. Beneath it all, Iranians?and their lives in the Islamic Republic remain shrouded in myth and stereotypes. So who in the world are Iranians in these shifting times?

A CONVERSATION Lila Azam Zanganeh, who aims "to corrode fixed ideas and turn cultural and political clich's on their heads" and is editor of My Sister, Guard Your Veil; My Brother, Guard Your Eyes: Uncensored Iranian Voices, will have a conversation with Azar Nafisi, author of Reading Lolita in Tehran: A Memoir in Books, on the chrysalid of identity politics versus the durable pigments of individual imagination; when politics collide with poetry.

A DISCUSSION
Four Iranian women, Shirin Neshat, Roya Hakakian, Azadeh Moaveni, and Lila Azam Zanganeh, moderator, will discuss the problematic notion of Iranian identity: Who are we in these shifting times and how do we devise ways to formulate it? The panel will give their perspectives on race, religion, and sexuality in?and in exile from the Islamic Republic.

A READING
Actress Soraya Broukhim will read from the book.

MUSIC
Sussan Deyhim, a Persian vocalist, will perform.

This event is co-sponsored by PEN American Center.

About Azar Nafisi

Azar Nafisi is a professor of aesthetics, culture, and literature at the School of Advanced International Studies at Johns Hopkins University and the author of Reading Lolita in Tehran: A Memoir in Books, a compassionate and often harrowing portrait of the Islamic revolution in Iran. She has lectured and written extensively on the political implications of literature and culture, as well as the human rights of the Iranian women and girls and the important role they play in the process of change for pluralism and an open society in Iran. Azar Nafisi has written for The New York Times, Washington Post, and The Wall Street Journal. Her cover story, "The Veiled Threat: The Iranian Revolution's Woman Problem" published in The New Republic has been reprinted into several languages. She is the author of Anti-Terra: A Critical Study of Vladimir Nabokov?s Novels. She is currently working on two books, one tentatively titled The Republic of the Imagination, which is about the power of literature to liberate minds and peoples, and the other, Things I Have Been Silent About, about culture, history, and loss.

About Shirin Neshat

Shirin Neshat is a visual artist known for her photography and video installations. Her work has been showcased around the world, most notably at the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York. Shirin Neshat began stirring controversy with her photo series Women of Allah. The series drew international attention as well as widespread criticism that Neshat was romanticizing Islamic fundamentalism. Neshat moved on to video installations showcasing allegorical narratives about gender issues in Islam. Her work has been exhibited around the world, and she is the recipient of many awards, including the First International Prize at the Venice Biennale in 1999 and, most recently, at Hiroshima City Museum of Art, Hiroshima, Japan.

About Roya Hakakian

Roya Hakakian is a journalist and writer. She has collaborated with the journalism units on 60 Minutes, A&E's "Travels With Harry" hour, and ABC Documentary Specials with the late Peter Jennings, Discovery and The Learning Channel. She writes for numerous publications, including the Wall Street Journal, the Washington Post, and is a contributor to the Weekend Edition of NPR's All Things Considered. She is a founding member of the Iran Human Rights Documentation Center, and a term member at the Council on Foreign Relations. She provides commentary on the subject of the Middle East and human rights to the media and has appeared on CSPAN-Book TV, CNN International, CBS Early Show, and Now with Bill Moyers. Hakakian is the author of two collections of poetry in Persian and Journey from the Land of No: A Girlhood Caught in Revolutionary Iran.

About Azadeh Moaveni

Moaveni grew up in California, her parents having left Iran in 1976, three years before the Islamic revolution. The unresolved tension she felt between her cultural identity as an Iranian and an American led her to go to Iran as a journalist. For two years she wrote about Iran for Time, finding a complex and varied reality. Her stay was bracketed by the pro-democracy student demonstrations of 1999 and President Bush's "axis of evil" speech in 2001, after which the government clamped down hard on dissent and on journalists. She was compelled to leave in fear for her safety. Her book Lipstick Jihad: A Memoir of Growing up Iranian in America and American in Iran is the account of Moaveni's time in Iran, and of her quest to better understand her cultural identity.

About Soraya Broukhim

An actress born in New York City with both an Iranian and European background, Soraya Broukhim is a graduate of Fordham University, British American Academy of Dramatic Arts, National Theatre Institute, and St. Petersburg State Arts Theatre Academy. Among her recent New York City theatre credits are Gut Girls, Woyzeck, Innocent Erendira, Logic of the Birds, The American Revolution, and Afghan Women by William Mastrosimone. She performed Antigone as part of an UNESCO/ITI International Theatre Conference. Broukhim has also starred in two independent films Love in Three Minutes and The Push. She is currently working with Ripe Time Co., on Betrothed, an adaptation of two short stories, Dybbuk by Anton Chekhov and The Treatment of Bibi Haldar by Pulitzer Prize writer Jhumpa Lahiri. Broukhim is slated to play Simone Weil in a documentary about her life.

Lila Azam Zanganeh

Lila Azam Zanganeh was born in Paris to Iranian parents. She is a graduate of the Ecole Normale Superieure, where she studied literature and philosophy, and holds a masters degree in international affairs from Columbia University. She initially moved to the United States to teach literature, cinema and Romance languages at Harvard University. She is a contributor to Le Monde and has been published in The New York Times, The Herald Tribune, The Nation, and La Repubblica. Her first book, My Sister, Guard Your Veil; My Brother, Guard Your Eyes, is a literary antidote to disinformation on Iran and Iranians with essays, interviews, photos and illustrations from an array of Iranian literary and artistic talents. Their interpretations veer between hilarity and despair, and offer color-studded and incisive perspectives on life, identity, and sexuality in?and in exile from?the Islamic Republic. She is currently at work on a book about Vladimir Nabokov.

About Sussan Deyhim

Sussan Deyhim is a composer, vocalist and performance artist who has been at the forefront of experimental music internationally for over two decades. Deyhim's music combines extended vocal techniques, digital processing, and the ancient mysticism of Middle Eastern music to create a deeply moving fusion of East and West. Among her many performances are a one-woman show Vocodeliks, commissioned by the Whitney Museum of Art; and her collaborations with visual artist/filmmaker Shirin Neshat, including the video Turbulent, which won the Golden Lion at the Venice Biennial and their multimedia performance Logic of the Birds. Deyhim's most recent projects include a multimedia opera Zarathustra's Mother, a collaboration with Polish composer Jan Kazcmarek, and a collaboration with composer Paul Haslinger and the legendary vocalist Nona Hendrix.

MY LIVES: AN AUTOBIOGRAPHY Edmund White in conversation with Paul Holdengräber

Tuesday, April 11, 2006, 7 p.m.

Having written four autobiographical novels, starting with A Boy's Own Story, Edmund White has now moved into a new genre, pure autobiography. My Lives reveals everything he has foreshortened or disguised in his previous work. Here is the unvarnished truth about his mother and father, his psychiatrists, his legions of hustlers and lovers, his famous friends. If in his fiction he attempted to fashion a representative gay man of his generation moving from the repression of the fifties towards the liberation of the sixties into the fulfillment of the seventies and the tragedy of the age of Aids in the eighties and nineties, in this new autobiography White has put aside this generalizing and historical perspective. Now he wants to show one man, himself, untypical, even eccentric.

The book does not move chronologically but rather by topics--"My Blonds," "My Friends," "My Europe," "My Women" are just a few of the chapter titles. These chapters become meditations on the adventure of living today as a cultured mind in a great city. In "My Master," White, a 66-year-old Princeton professor, reveals how he became a part-time slave for two and a half years to a handsome young sadist.

But White is too much of a humorist, too excrutiatingly self-conscious, ever to describe his splendors and miseries as tragic or even mystical or wholly perverted. He is a supremely ironic novelist who knows how to make even the most extreme degradation sound flawed, touching, believable. Now at his peak, White has learned how to translate an entire breathing, pulsing life onto the page.

This event is co-sponsored by the Dorothy and Lewis B. Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers. 

About Edmund White

Edmund White's novels include Forgetting Elena, Nocturnes for the King of Naples, A Boy's Own Story, The Beautiful Room Is Empty, The Farewell Symphony, and The Married Man. Edmund White teaches creative writing at Princeton University, and this year serves as a Cullman Center Fellow at the New York Public Library. His new book is My Lives: An Autobiography.

About Paul Holdengräber

Paul Holdengräber is the Director of Public Programs - now known as "LIVE from the NYPL" - for The Research Libraries of The New York Public Library. At the NYPL his stated goal is to make the lions roar.

ALFRED BRENDEL in conversation with Paul Holdengraber

Monday, February 13, 2006, 6 p.m.

It has often been said that Vladimir Horowitz had two topics of conversation, the piano and Horowitz.

Not so of Alfred Brendel. His capacious erudition, his delight in architecture, his love for literature and cartoons, especially Shakespeare, Edward Gorey and Gary Larson, are well known. "The philosopher king of the modern keyboard," and one of the world's greatest living pianists will reveal his love of inspired nonsense, his dadaist propensities and his passion for kitsch in a conversation with Paul Holdengräber, Director of Public Programs at the New York Public Library ("LIVE from the NYPL"). For the past decade, Brendel has been writing poetry:

Once upon a time
I was no wunderkind
Due to my obstinacy
Though
I became one later.

Brendel's taste for absurdity, "If I had to write my autobiography, I'd make the whole thing up;" his bewilderment at his own success, "the fact that I managed to acquire some esteem fills me with amused and slightly incredulous pleasure;" and, of course, his love for music will be explored during an evening of music and miscellany.

About Alfred Brendel

Alfred Brendel, who celebrates his 75th birthday during January 2006, is among the greatest musicians of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Renowned for his masterly interpretations of the works of Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, Schubert, Brahms and Liszt, he is one of the indisputable authorities in musical life today and one of the very few living pianists whose name alone guarantees a sell-out anywhere in the world he chooses to play.

Yet Brendel had a most untypical start compared to most of his peers. He was not a child prodigy, his parents were not musicians, there was no music in the house and, as he admits himself, he is neither a good sight—reader nor blessed with a phenomenal memory. "A teacher can be too influential," he feels. "Being self-taught, I learned to distrust anything I hadn't figured out myself." More valuable than teachers was listening to other pianists, conductors and singers?and himself. Brendel learned by recording the piece he was studying, listening to himself and reacting to it. "I still think that for young people today this is a very good way to get on," he says, "and it makes some of the functions of a teacher obsolete."

During the 1960s Brendel created history when he was the first pianist to record all of Beethoven's piano works and his reputation as one of the finest Beethoven interpreters was established. Alfred Brendel's most recent recording activities have focussed on Mozart and he has revisited a number of the Piano Concertos and made new recordings with the Scottish Chamber Orchestra and one of the greatest Mozart conductors of today, Sir Charles Mackerras.

About Paul Holdengräber

Paul Holdengräber is the Director of Public Programs - newly minted and now known as "LIVE from the NYPL" - for The Research Libraries of The New York Public Library. At the NYPL his stated goal is to make the lions roar.

AMERICAN VERTIGO: Bernard-Henri Lévy and Tina Brown

Thursday, January 26, 2006, 6 p.m.

WHO ARE WE IN FOREIGN EYES?

What can a Frenchman tell us about America? Alexis de Tocqueville told us a lot, some 150 years ago. Today, another Frenchman, writer-philosopher Bernard-Henri Lévy, has retraced the footsteps of de Tocqueville and gives us his account of contemporary America. Tina Brown, former editor of The New Yorker and host of "Topic A" on CNBC will grill BHL and ask France's most provocative thinker:

Will Paris burn again?
Will American Muslims soon be aflame like the French?
What's left of the American Dream?
Is America the laboratory or the grave of tomorrow's democracy?
Are Europe and the United States headed for divorce or condemned to love one another?
And, in the end, which is greater: the vertigo of the French writer who travels through every one of this mad magnificent country's fifty states; or the vertigo of Americans themselves as they stare into the abyss of their new destiny?

About Bernard-Henry Lévy

Bernard-Henri Lévy is one of France's leading philosophers and one of the most esteemed writers in Europe. After starting his career as a war reporter for Combat the legendary newspaper founded by Albert Camus during the Nazi occupation of France, Lévy became famous as the founder of the New Philosophers group.

Lévy is the author of 30 books, including works of philosophy, fiction, and biography and is an activist and filmmaker. His books include Barbarism with a Human Face, Reflections on War, Century of Sartre, Evil and the End of History, Who Killed Daniel Pearl? and American Vertigo (Random House, Jan 06). His films include the documentaries Bosna! and A Day in the Death of Sarajevo. Lévy is co-founder of the antiracist group SOS Racism and has served on diplomatic missions for the French government, most recently heading a fact finding mission to Afghanistan in the wake of the war against the Taliban.

During 2005 Bernard-Henri Lévy traveled throughout the United States in the footsteps of another great Frenchman, Alexis de Tocqueville, whose Democracy in America remains the most influential book ever written about our country. The result is his new book, American Vertigo, a fascinating, fresh look at a country we sometimes only think we know. Through interview-based portraits across the spectrum of the American people, from prison guards to clergymen, from a strip bar in Vegas to the Mayo Clinic, from Norman Mailer to Barack Obama, from Sharon Stone to Richard Holbrooke, both the grandeur and the hellish dimensions of American life are unflinchingly explored.

About Tina Brown

Tina Brown began her career in journalism writing for the London Sunday Times, The New Statesman and The Sunday Telegraph. Ms. Brown's editorial reputation for revitalizing publications was established at the Tatler magazine in London where she was named editor-in-chief when she was 25 years old. She then moved to the United States and was editor-in-chief of Vanity Fair which under her direction won four National Magazine Awards. Ms. Brown herself was named Advertising Age's first Magazine Editor of the Year.

In 1992 Ms. Brown became editor of The New Yorker magazine where she raised the circulation and the magazine was honored with over 20 awards. Ms. Brown received the National Press Foundation's 1992 Editor of the Year Award. In 1998, she founded Talk Media with partners Harvey and Bob Weinstein of Miramax Films launching Talk magazine and the Talk Miramax Books Company.

Presently, she writes a weekly column in The Washington Post and until recently hosted CNBC?s Topic A with Tina Brown, a weekly series which featured opinionated guests discussing and debating provocative topics in the arenas of business, politics and culture. Tina is writing a book about the legacy of Diana, Princess of Wales, which will examine the effect she had on the monarchy, the public and the press to be published in 2007.

THE DILEMMA OF THE NEW: Michael Kimmelman

Friday, December 9, 2005, 6 p.m.

The Robert B. Silvers Lecture.

What comes after the shock of the new?

An informal defense of the personal pleasures of looking at art now, taking in changes over the last few decades and the current scene, from Matthew Barney, Christo, Richard Serra and earth art to modern memorials.

A decidedly personal approach to how we might respond to what's new. Kimmelman will argue against ideology and for the benefits of open eyes and an open mind.

About Michael Kimmelman:

Michael Kimmelman is the longtime chief art critic of The New York Times and a contributor to the New York Review of Books. Time Magazine describes his latest book, The Accidental Masterpiece: On the Art of Life and Vice Versa, as a "transcendent experience." It has just been named a notable book of the year for 2005 by The Times. A finalist for the Pulitzer Prize, Kimmelman is also the author of Portraits: Talking with Artists at the Met, the Modern, the Louvre and Elsewhere .

About The Robert B. Silvers Lecture:

The Robert B. Silvers Lecture is an annual series created by Max Palevsky in recognition of the work of Robert B. Silvers, co-editor of The New York Review of Books, of which he was a founder in 1963. The series features contemporary people whose fields correspond to the broad range of Mr. Silver?s interests in literature, the arts, politics, economics, history, and the sciences.

ALICE WALKER and MARGO JEFFERSON: A Conversation

Wednesday, November 30, 2005, 6:30 p.m.

Please note: This event starts at 7:30 pm.

"Alice Walker has lived many lives: as poet, novelist and essayist; as civil rights fighter and "womanist," a term she coined; as Southerner, Northerner and traveler. She has been much praised and sometimes much attacked. Even as The Color Purple has made its ways from book to film to Broadway, other books and stories of hers are being censored by school boards. I want our conversation to explore these lives—how they have taken shape and direction through the years, and how they go on changing."
--Margo Jefferson

About Alice Walker:

Alice Walker won the Pulitzer Prize and the American Book Award for her third novel, The Color Purple, which was made into an internationally popular film by Steven Spielberg. Her other novels, which have been translated into more than two dozen languages, include By the Light of My Father's Smile, Possessing the Secret of Joy, and The Temple of My Familiar. Her most recent novel, Now Is the Time to Open Your Heart, was published in 2004. Ms. Walker is also the author of several collections of short stories, essays and poems as well as children's books. Her work has appeared in numerous national and international journals and magazines. An activist and social visionary, Ms. Walker has been a participant in most of the major movements of planetary change, among them the human and civil rights movement in the South, the hands off Cuba movement, the women's movement, the Native American and indigenous rights movement, the free South Africa movement, the environmental and animal rights movement and the peace movement. Her advocacy on behalf of the dispossessed has, in the words of her biographer, Evelyn C. White, "spanned the globe."

About Margo Jefferson:

Margo L. Jefferson was appointed critic-at-large, covering theater, at the New York Times in 1996, after having served as Sunday theater critic. Prior to joining The Times in 1993, Ms. Jefferson taught American literature, performing arts criticism, writing and English at Columbia University and before that was an assistant professor in the Department of Journalism and Mass Communication at New York University. In addition she has been an arts criticism contributing editor at Vogue magazine, a contributing editor to 7 Days magazine, and an associate editor at Newsweek magazine. Ms. Jefferson has been a contributing critic to Grand Street, The Nation, The New York Times Book Review, The Village Voice, and Ms. magazine among many others. In 1995, Ms. Jefferson was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for criticism. Ms. Jefferson received a B.A. degree, cum laude, in English and American Literature from Brandeis University and an M.S. degree from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism.

LINCOLN'S MELANCHOLY: POWER & DEPRESSION Former First Lady Rosalynn Carter and Joshua Wolf Shenk

Tuesday, November 29, 2005, 6 p.m.

First Lady Rosalynn Carter and Joshua Wolf Shenk, author of the new book, Lincoln's Melancholy: How Depression Challenged a President and Fueled His Greatness, discuss Lincoln's struggles and triumphs - and the surprising confluence of private pain and public leadership. Seen by his contemporaries as a crucial aspect of his life and character, Lincoln's lifelong depression has lurked in the shadows of history for generations. Now this dark subject is coming into the light and, with it, vital lessons about the poignant realities and potential of people living with mental illness. First Lady Rosalynn Carter and Joshua Wolf Shenk will address the stigma still associated with depression and how we might overcome that stigma.

About Rosalynn Carter:

Former First Lady Rosalynn Carter has worked for more than three decades to improve the quality of life for people around the world. Today, she is an advocate for mental health, early childhood immunization, human rights, and conflict resolution through her work at The Carter Center in Atlanta. The center is a private, not-for-profit institution founded by former President and Mrs. Jimmy Carter in 1982.

A full partner with the president in all the center's activities, the former first lady is a member of The Carter Center Board of Trustees. She created and chairs the Carter Center's Mental Health Task Force, an advisory body of experts, consumers, and advocates promoting positive change in the mental health field. Each year, she hosts the Rosalynn Carter Symposium on Mental Health Policy, bringing together leaders of the nation's mental health organizations to address critical issues. Mrs. Carter emerged as a driving force for mental health when, during the Carter administration, she became active honorary chair of the President's Commission on Mental Health, which resulted in passage of the Mental Health Systems Act of 1980.

About Joshua Wolf Shenk:

Joshua Wolf Shenk is the author of Lincoln's Melancholy: How Depression Challenged a President and Fueled His Greatness. The book was previewed by Shenk's July 2005 cover story in Time Magazine and adapted as a cover story in the October 2005 Atlantic Monthly. Newsman Mike Wallace describes Shenk's analysis as "an extraordinary story, both for the depth of its scholarship and the lure of its style."

Shenk's work has also appeared in Harper's Magazine, The New Yorker, The New York Times, and other publications. He is a contributing editor to The Washington Monthly and a member of the writing faculty at the the New School University.

Shenk began his work on Lincoln's depression as a Rosalynn Carter Fellow in Mental Health Journalism at the Carter Center. His other honors include a fellowship at the New York Foundation for the Arts in non-fiction literature and residencies at the MacDowell Colony, Yaddo, and the Blue Mountain Center.

GOPNIK x 2: Fact, Myth & Theory of Childhood

Monday, November 28, 2005, 6 p.m.

Brother and sister, Adam and Alison Gopnik, will talk about childhood and debate the logic and imagination of literature (Adam) and of science (Alison) based on their respective books The King in the Window and The Scientist in the Crib: What Early Learning Tells Us About the Mind.

Adam says: Alison and I have been debating the meanings of childhood since we were children, and continue that debate today. We both have a strong sense that the numinous illuminations of childhood are in some way genuinely enchanted that children really do walk with trails of glory but have pursued that insight, or belief, in different ways. Alison, professor of psychology at Berkeley, in her books and articles, has become expert on the way children think, reason, and learn; I, a New Yorker veteran, in my essays and stories, have recorded the way that children imagine, pretend, and act. Recently, my book for children The King In the Window, was crafted with the constant help, assistance and kibitzing of Alison, and her insights into the logical and theory-pursuing mind of the child is present on its pages. On this occasion, we will swap stories, argue fine points, and debate whether the science of childhood is better than the art of children's literature, or whether indeed a true science of childhood is even possible at all—or at least, what points of contact the study and the entertainment of children have with each other. Though likely to become heated, as our debates have been since the age of six and seven, the great probability is that we will agree on the essential point: that feeling and intellect, emotion and logic, the mind and the soul of the child, evolve together."

Alison says: "The conventional wisdom is that logic and imagination, science and fantasy are deeply opposed aspects of human nature. And the wisdom since the age of the Romantics has been that children's thinking belongs to the realm of imagination and fantasy rather than logic and science children are deeply irrational, solipsistic, intuitive, phantasizers rather than thoughtful pursuers of the truth. Twenty years of research on children's thinking has turned this conventional reasoning on its head in fact, children are the best learners we know of and they use many of the same techniques as scientists to learn so much. Still, the fact remains that children are also the wildest imaginers we know of. How are these two aspects of children's minds connected?

My work in cognitive science suggests an answer to this question. It turns out that the kind of reasoning that children do best, reasoning about causes and possibilities, is deeply linked to both logic and imagination. This is a logic that allows children (and grown-ups) to envision possible future worlds, very different from the worlds we inhabit now, and to bring those worlds into being. This ability to imagine alternative possibilities—to literally change the world—is a deeply important part of our evolutionary inheritance. But it is also the capacity that children exercise most dramatically in their wild imaginative play.

About Adam Gopnik:

Adam Gopnik, contributor to The New Yorker, served as the publication's Paris correspondent for five years where he focused on the details of everyday life and illuminated larger issues such as differences among societies, and our own particularities as Americans. Gopnik's essays on his experiences in France were later collected into a volume titled Paris to the Moon. New York Times writer Alain de Botton identified Gopnik's attention to seemingly trivial subjects as his particular genius: "The distinctive brilliance of Gopnik's essays lies in his ability to pick up a subject one would never have imagined it possible to think deeply about and then cover it in thoughts, making connections with literature, sociology and philosophy--all treated in a highly readable way. . . . He is truly able to see the whole world in a grain of sand."

About Alison Gopnik:

Alison Gopnik, a professor of psychology at University of California at Berkeley, began her studies of child psychology at Oxford. She intended to become a philosopher, but as she studied, she realized that instead of asking questions, she wanted to answer them: Studying development was a good way to answer them." Gopnik's interest in child development and folk psychology led her, with psychologist Andrew Meltzoff, to develop the "theory theory," which is the primary focus of their book, Words, Thoughts, and Theories. Gopnik's second book, The Scientist in the Crib: What Early Learning Tells Us About the Mind, written with Meltzoff and his wife, Patricia Kuhl, also a research psychologist, continues work on the "theory theory," further developing the informal, entertaining, and authoritative look at the science of the minds of babies.

GOING SANE: Adam Phillips and George Prochnik A Conversation

Tuesday, November 22, 2005, 6 p.m.

Writings on madness fill entire libraries, but until now nobody has thought to engage exclusively with the idea of sanity. What is sanity? A seemingly bland and nebulous state? The opposite of insanity? Madness is always present in our lives--in the chaos of our infancy, the rebellion of our adolescence, the insanity and irrational nature of our sexual appetites, the money madness that takes hold of us as the desire for wealth replaces our sexual desires. Sanity confounds us: according to Adam Phillips, it lacks the false allure of madness. Hamlet is glamorous, while the eminently sane Polonius comes off as a fool. Can the historical imbalance between sanity and insanity be redressed?

About Adam Phillips:

Adam Phillips is a psychoanalyst and the author of On Kissing, Tickling, and Being Bored: Psychoanalytic Essays on the Unexamined Life; On Flirtation: Psychoanalytic Essays on the Uncommitted Life; Darwin's Worms; and Houdini's Box. He is the General Editor of the new Penguin Modern Classics translations of Freud. According to Daphne Merkin, "He is, as ever, an original and lucid spirit, a buzzing intellectual gadfly in the ointment of our easy answers."

About George Prochnik:

George Prochnik's forthcoming book, Music of the Quills examines the friendship between Sigmund Freud and pioneering Boston psychologist James Jackson Putnam (the author's great-grandfather)and how that relationship and dialogue shaped the acceptance and practice of psychoanalysis in America. In the 1990s Prochnik taught English and American literature at Hebrew University in Jerusalem, where he wrote on the history of psychoanalytic criticism.

SLAVERY, LITERACY and FREEDOM

Sunday, November 20, 2005, 1 p.m.

Please join us for a very special afternoon with Howard Dodson, Chief of the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture; David Blight, Professor of History and Director, Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance, and Abolition, Yale University; Heather Williams, Assistant Professor of History, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Charles Turner, award winning Broadway actor; Novella Nelson, singer and actress; and David Burnett, violinist and head of Harlem School of the Arts, for readings, poetry, music and conversation exploring the close relationship between literacy and freedom. Opening with a reading of excerpts from Frederick Douglass's classic American slave narrative from the mid-1800s, then turning back the clock to visit New York City during the early colonial and national era, we will consider the influences of literacy and literature on enslaved and free blacks.

Presented in collaboration with the New-York Historical Society and JPMorganChase.

Howard Dodson has served as the Chief of the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture of the New York Public Library since 1984. A specialist in African American history as well as a noted lecturer and consultant, Mr. Dodson has curated exhibitions, produced humanities and performing arts programs and developed the Schomburg Center into the premier public research library in the world devoted to documenting the global black experience.

David Blight is Professor of History and Director of Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance, and Abolition at Yale University. He has participated closely in the discovery and bringing to light of two new slave narratives in 2004 and is now editing the forthcoming book, Rowing to Freedom: The Emancipation of John Washington and Wallace Turnage.

Heather A. Williams is a former attorney with the U.S. Department of Justice and the New York State Attorney General's Office. She is assistant professor of history at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Her book, Self-Taught: African American Education in Slavery and Freedom was published in March 2005.

Charles Turner has performed major roles on and off Broadway. Most recently he stood in for James Earle Jones in the Broadway production of On Golden Pond co-starring with Leslie Uggams. As a director, he staged Ceremonies in Dark Old Men with Denzel Washington. His television appearances include "Law & Order" and "Dave Chappelle Show."

Novella Nelson, singer and actress, has sung at clubs such as Reno Sweeney and The Hungry I, as well as at Lincoln Center, and Carnegie Hall. Among her Broadway credits, she created the role of Aunt Missy in the original production of Purlie, and appeared in Having our Say. Her films include Antwone Fisher, Birth, and the forthcoming Stephanie Daley and Griffin and Phoenix.

David Burnett is the head of the string department at Harlem School of the Arts. He is a violinist/teacher and also has a residency with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra.

Co-presented with WIRED Magazine THE BATTLE OVER BOOKS: Authors & Publishers Take on the Google Print Library Project

Thursday, November 17, 2005, 6 p.m.

Allan Adler, Association of American Publishers
Chris Anderson, Wired Magazine
David Drummond, Google
Paul LeClerc & David Ferriero, The New York Public Library
Lawrence Lessig, Stanford Law School
Nick Taylor, The Authors Guild

Last December, Google launched its Print Library Project to scan books from the collections of several major libraries: Harvard, Michigan, Stanford, Oxford, and the New York Public Library.

Google explained: "Our ultimate goal is to work with publishers and libraries to create a comprehensive, searchable, virtual card catalog of all books in all languages that helps users discover new books and publishers find new readers."

Sounds like a win-win-win-win for readers, authors, publishers, and libraries alike, right? But as we have seen with other media migrating to the Internet, such a project raises a number of questions about intellectual property rights, fair use, piracy, access, ownership, distribution, compensation, and control. This fall, the Authors Guild and the Association of American Publishers filed lawsuits against Google, citing massive copyright infringement.

LIVE from the NYPL and WIRED Magazine present a provocative discussion about the competing interests and issues raised by the Google Print Library Project, and whether a universal digital repository of our collective knowledge is in our future.

Allan Adler is Vice President for Legal Governmental Affairs at the Association of American Publishers (AAP), the national trade organization which represents the US book and journal publishing industries.

Chris Anderson is the WIRED Magazine's Editor-in-Chief and is the author of the forthcoming book on his Long Tail theory. WIRED is the recipient of the 2005 National Magazine Award for General Excellence and Anderson was recently named Advertising Age's Editor of the Year.

David Drummond is Google's Vice President, Corporate Development and works with Google's management team to evaluate and drive new strategic business opportunities, including strategic alliances and mergers and acquisitions. He also serves as Google's general counsel.

David Ferriero is the Andrew W. Mellon Director and Chief Executive of the Research Libraries at the New York Public Library and is charged with moving the four world-renowned Research Libraries into the 21st Century.

Paul LeClerc has been President and Chief Executive Officer of The New York Public Library for the past twelve years. He also serves as a trustee of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the National Book Foundation, and the American Academy of Rome. President Clinton named him to the President's Committee on the Arts and Humanities.

Lawrence Lessig is a professor at Stanford Law School, the Founder and Chairman of Creative Commons, and the author of Code, The Future of Ideas, and Free Culture: The Nature and Future of Creativity.

Nick Taylor is a best-selling author, the President of the Authors Guild, and an advocate of copyright and fair contracts. In addition, he is a director of the Authors Guild Foundation and a member of the literary organization PEN.
 

GRAPHIC ART: Nicholson Baker and Art Spiegelman

Monday, November 7, 2005, 6 p.m.

Nicholson Baker and Art Spiegelman discuss the graphic art of Joseph Pulitzer's colorful, chaotic turn-of-the-century newspaper, the New York World.

About Nicholson Baker

Nicholson Baker was born in 1957 and attended The Eastman School of Music and Haverford College. Baker and his wife, Margaret Brentano, co-author of The World on Sunday (2005), founded the American Newspaper Repository in 1999 in order to save a large collection of U.S. newspapers. The collection includes bound runs of the New York Tribune, the New York Times, the Chicago Tribune, and Joseph Pulitzer's influencial daily, the New York World. In 2004 the Repository's holdings became a gift to Duke University.

Baker has published seven novels--The Mezzanine, Room Temperature, Vox, The Fermata, The Everlasting Story of Nory, A Box of Matches, and Checkpoint--and three works of nonfiction, U and I, The Size of Thoughts, and Double Fold, which won a National Book Critics Circle Award. His work has been published by The New Yorker, The Atlantic, Harper's, the New York Review of Books, the London Review of Books, American Libraries, Best American Short Stories, and Best American Essays. Baker and Brentano live in Maine.

About Art Spiegelman

Art Spiegelman was born in Stockholm, Sweden in 1948. He began drawing professionally at age 16 and went on to study at Harpur College before becoming part of the underground comics movement. Spiegelman worked as a creative consultant for Topps Candy and taught at SVA in New York. He founded RAW, the acclaimed avant-garde comics magazine, with his wife, Francoise Mouly and was a staff artist and writer for The New Yorker where much of his work was published.

Spiegelman won the Pulitzer Prize in 1992 for his Holocaust narrative, Maus. He has been honored with a Guggenheim fellowship and was nominated for the National Book Critics Circle Award. In the Shadow of No Towers was selected by The New York Times Book Review as one of the 100 Notable Books of 2004. He published Open Me... I'm A Dog and the illustration accompaniment to the 1928 book The Wild Party, by Joseph Moncure March. This year, Art Spiegelman was made a Chevalier de l Ordre des Arts et des Lettres in France. He is working on "Drawn to Death: A Three Panel Opera" with composer Phillip Johnston. Speigelman currently edits Little Lit, and has completed an anthology of his New Yorker work, Kisses from New York. He lives in New York City with his wife and two children.

ATTENTION SPAN: Rebecca Solnit and Jonathan Miller

Friday, November 4, 2005, 6 p.m.

Rebecca Solnit, cultural critic and activist, joins Jonathan Miller, theater and opera director, physician, curator, and author: a conversation between two extraordinary minds. Expect to hear a conversation about.

Attention Span: What does it mean to pay attention from a physiological point of view (Miller) and a metaphysical point of view (Solnit)?
How long do people pay attention to something?
How long does it take to know, see, comprehend something?

Solnit and Miller will address the increasing restless rapidity of modern life. These questions, as Solnit states are good questions for libraries concerned as they are with collective memory and preserving the art of reading.

About Rebecca Solnit:

Rebecca Solnit's new book, A Field Guide to Getting Lost, explores losing one's self in the pleasures of experience uncertaintly, trust, loss, memory, desire, and place. Her books include Wanderlust: A History of Walking; River of Shadows: Eadweard Muybridge and the Technological Wild West. In her book Hope in the Dark: Untold Histories, Wild Possibilities she writes ? . . . I want to propose a new vision of how change happens . . . . I want to start over with an imagination adequate to the possibilities and the strangeness and the dangers on this earth in this moment.

About Jonathan Miller:

Jonathan Miller was a physician specializing in neurology when he left the medical profession for a career in the performing arts. Beyond the Fringe, a satirical comedy revue that opened on Broadway in 1962 and was a collaboration with Peter Cook, Alan Bennett, and Dudley Moore, marked the beginning of a new career in which he went from performing to producing and directing numerous productions for stage, opera, and television. Miller has become well known for his unique interpretations of Shakespeare and opera classics. In addition to his theatrical pursuits, Miller has written several books reflecting his fascination with medicine and science. One of these, The Body in Question, evolved from a thirteen-part television documentary that Miller created for the BBC. His other books include Nowhere in Particular and Darwin for Beginners.

ORDINARY HEROES: Scott Turow and Jeffrey Toobin

Tuesday, November 1, 2005, 6 p.m.

Jeffrey Toobin and Scott Turow will discuss some of the themes of Turow's new novel, Ordinary Heroes: a son discovers that his father, an Army lawyer in Europe during World War II, had been court-martialed for releasing a suspected spy.

Toobin and Turow will talk about the inevitable secrets and deceptions between the generations, an effect that may have become more pronounced in the case of those who fought in World War II because of their characteristic reluctance to discuss their wartime experiences with their children.

Toobin and Turow also expect to discuss the enigmatic role of law in a time of war, and the problems of re-constructing history, from the perspective of a novelist and a journalist.

About Scott Turow:

Scott Turow is a writer and an attorney. He uses his insider's knowledge of the American legal system to form the basis for best-selling suspense novels. Turow explores the murky terrain of urban justice through highly plotted fiction. He is the author of six bestselling novels: Presumed Innocent, The Burden of Proof, Pleading Guilty, The Laws of Our Fathers, Personal Injuries, and Reversible Errors, which received the Heartland Prize. His latest, Ordinary Heroes, is about an army lawyer on the European battlefields during World War II. Scott Turow has also written two non-fiction books, One L, about his experience as a law student, and Ultimate Punishment, a reflection on the death penalty, which received the Robert F. Kennedy Book Award. He has been a partner in the Chicago office of Sonnenschein Nath and Rosenthal, a national law firm, since 1986, concentrating on white-collar criminal defense while also devoting a substantial part of his time to pro bono work. He frequently contributes essays and op-ed pieces to publications such as The New York Times, The Washington Post, and The New Yorker.

About Jeffrey Toobin:

Jeffrey Toobin has been a staff writer at The New Yorker since 1993. He is also the senior legal analyst for CNN, which he joined in 2002 after six years with ABC News. In 2000, he received an Emmy Award for his coverage of the Elian Gonzalez case. His most recent book is Too Close to Call: The 36-Day Battle to Decide the 2000 Election. He is also the author of A Vast Conspiracy: The Real Story of the Sex Scandal that Nearly Brought Down a President, and The Run of His Life: The People v. O.J. Simpson. Since joining The New Yorker, Mr. Toobin has covered legal affairs and written articles on such subjects as Attorney General John Ashcroft, the Florida recount, Kenneth Starr's investigation of President Clinton, the Paula Jones sexual harassment case, Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas, and the trials of Timothy McVeigh and O.J. Simpson. Prior to joining The New Yorker , Mr. Toobin served as an Assistant United States Attorney in Brooklyn, New York. He also served as an associate counsel in the Office of Independent Counsel Lawrence E. Walsh, an experience that provided the basis for his first book, Opening Arguments: A Young Lawyer's First Case--United States v. Oliver North. Toobin is currently at work on a book about the U.S. Supreme Court.

DESTROYING THE COLOR LINE: John Hope Franklin and President Bill Clinton

Thursday, October 27, 2005, 7 p.m.

John Hope Franklin's upcoming autobiography, Mirror to America, recounts not only the story of his life but also the epic story of the twentieth-century fight for civil rights. In 1997 he was appointed by President Clinton to chair the President's Initiative on Race. On October 27, 2005, they will discuss race in America and how to "destroy the color line that continues to divide our country."

John Hope Franklin lived through America's defining twentieth-century transformation the dismantling of legally protected racial segregation. A renowned scholar, he has explored that transformation in its myriad aspects, most notably in his book, From Slavery to Freedom. He experienced segregation firsthand. Born in 1915, he was evicted from whites-only train cars, confined to segregated schools, threatened once with lynching and consistently faced racism's denigration of his humanity. He earned a Ph.D. from Harvard; became the first black historian to assume a full professorship at a white institution; reshaped the way African American history is understood and taught; and personally challenged the racism he chronicled. From his effort in 1934 to force President Franklin Roosevelt to respond to the Cordie Cheek lynching, to his 1997 appointment to head President Clinton's initiative on race, Franklin, with determination and dignity, has influenced the nation's racial conscience. His books include George Washington Williams: A Biography, Reconstruction After the Civil War, The Emancipation Proclamation, and Racial Equality in America, an examination of the egalitarian principles of America's founding fathers. In 1995, Franklin's lifelong fight for civil rights earned him the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation's highest civilian honor. John Hope Franklin taught at Howard University, Brooklyn College, University of Chicago, and Duke University. He maintains a greenhouse containing more than 200 orchids, one, the "phalaeonopsis John Hope Franklin," named for him.

"With his remarkable sense of humanity, renowned historian John Hope Franklin shares his life journey--an odyssey marked by scholarship, public service, and his passionate commitment to improve the condition of African Americans and their relations with their fellow citizens. Through candid stories of Franklin's relentless pursuit of equality, Mirror to America calls upon all Americans to look at our nation's past so that we may destroy the color line that continues to divide our country, and progress together into the future." -- President Bill Clinton

David Ostwald will open the evening with his Gully Low Jazz Band aka The Louis Armstrong Centennial Band.

David Ostwald, tuba, leader
Jon-Erik Kellso, trumpet
Anat Cohen, clarinet
Vincent Gardner, trombone, vocals
James Chirillo, banjo
Marion Felder, drums

Inspired by such jazz pioneers as Louis Armstrong, Bix Beiderbecke, Duke Ellington, and Jelly Roll Morton, David Ostwald's band has appeared at Lincoln Center's Midsummer's Night Swing, at The New York Public Library's Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, at Lionel Hampton's New Orleans-style funeral procession, and every week for the past six years at Birdland. The band will perform Fats Waller's Black and Blue, Nobody Knows the Trouble I've Seen, and Duke Ellington's Black and Tan Fantasy.

The Book that Changed My Life Marathon at Symphony Space

Saturday, October 22, 2005, 11 a.m.

This twelve-hour event will feature luminaries from many fields, speaking about books that greatly influenced them, followed by readings of excerpts from those works by Broadway and Hollywood actors. A special feature will be readings from books that changed the culture, in celebration of the 70th anniversary of the New York Times bestseller list. Co-hosted by Paul Holdengräber, Director of Public Programs, NYPL, and Isaiah Sheffer, Artistic Director, Symphony Space

Co-presented with Symphony Space

SEGMENT ONE: 11:00 AM - 2:00 PM
Jon Scieszka, children's book author
John Lithgow, actor & children's book author
Sandra Boynton, children's book author & illustrator
Cynthia Nixon, actress
Jacques d'Amboise, Founder, National Dance Institute
Carmen Farina, Deputy Chancellor for Teaching & Learning, NYC Department of Education
Richard Thomas, actor
Charlotte d'Amboise, actor & dancer
Anne Jackson, actor

Readings from bestseller: A Tree Grows in Brooklyn by Betty Smith

SEGMENT TWO: 2:00 - 5:00 PM
Mark Bittman, food writer
Yusef Komunyakaa, poet
André Aciman, essayist
Clive Gillinson, Executive & Artistic Director, Carnegie Hall
Elissa Schappell, writer
Kate Burton, actress
Dana Gioia, Chairman, National Endowment for the Arts
Blair Brown, actor
Joe Morton, actor

Readings from bestseller: The Color Purple by Alice Walker

SEGMENT THREE: 5:00 - 8:00 PM
Oskar Eustis, Artistic Director, The Public Theater
Maira Kalman, writer & illustrator
Ned Rorem, composer
Tom Otterness, sculptor
Nicholas Scoppetta, Fire Commissioner of New York City
Fritz Weaver, Actor
Thelma Golden, Deputy Director, The Studio Museum in Harlem
Linda Fairstein, author & former prosecutor

SEGMENT FOUR: 8:00 - 11:00 PM
Margo Jefferson, cultural critic, New York Times
Wren Brown, actor
Kathleen Chalfant, actress
Philip Gourevitch, journalist/editor, The Paris Review
Amy Sedaris, actor & writer
Doug Wright, playwright
Jerrold Nadler, congressman
Marian Seldes, actor
Howard Dodson, Chief, Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture
Kurt Andersen, journalist
Jerrold Nadler, congressman

Readings from bestseller: In Cold Blood by Truman Capote

Sponsors for the event are Random House, Barnes and Noble, The National Book Foundation, XM Satellite Radio and The New York Times.

THE ELEMENTS OF STYLE: A Short Happy Evening of Song with Maira Kalman and Nico Muhly

Thursday, October 20, 2005, 8 a.m.

Come celebrate the publication of The Elements of Style: Illustrated by William Strunk Jr. and E.B. White with its illustrator Maira Kalman and composer Nico Muhly during the world premiere of a musical adaptation of this classic writing guide in the Rose Main Reading Room. What better place to bring to life the style guide that has aided countless writers, and whose capacious, book-lined span has been a sanctuary for writers and readers for almost one hundred years. With titles such as "Be Obscure Clearly!", "Overly Over," and "Hyphens," the songs are drawn from the humorous examples of poor writing and the pithy rules for proper grammar found in The Elements of Style. With audience members seated at the tables in the Reading Room's north hall, the performers will stand on the balcony, framed by the Reading Room's awe-inspiring painted ceiling. Featuring soprano vocalist Abby Fischer, tenor Matt Hensrud, and an ensemble that includes viola, banjo, and percussion, the music has been composed especially for this event by Juilliard School graduate and ASCAP award-winning composer Nico Muhly. Since it was first published in 1959, The Elements of Style has become an American institution; today, devotees of all ages--17 through 70--can recite the perfectly coined mantra, "make every word tell," of this inimitable writing manual.

Reception following performance in Astor Hall

About Maira Kalman:

In her own words: "born. bucolic childhood. culture stuffed adolescence. played piano. stopped. danced. stopped. wrote. discarded writing. drew. reinstated writing. married tibor kalman and collaborated at iconoclastic yet successful design studio. wrote and painted children's books. worried. took up ping pong. relaxed. wrote and painted for many magazines. co-founded the Rubber Band Society. amused. children: two. dog: one." The co-owner of the renowned design firm M&Co and creator (with Rick Meyerowitz) of the NEWYORKISTAN cover for The New Yorker, Maira Kalman is the author of a dozen children?s books, including Max Makes A Million, What Pete Ate from A-Z, and Next Stop Grand Central. She has designed for Isaac Mizrahi, Kate Spade, Mark Morris Dance Group, Ralph Pucci, and MoMA. Although she gets seasick quite easily, she plans to sail away on a tugboat with family and friends (and her dog Pete) to distant lands and far-off places. Maira Kalman, a contributor to The New Yorker, New York Magazine and many other publications, lives in New York City.

About Nico Muhly:

Nico Muhly graduated from Juilliard School for composition, where he studied with Christopher Rouse & John Corigliano. The American Symphony Orchestra under Leon Botstein premiered his Fits & Bursts at Avery Fisher Hall and the Juilliard Orchestra under Jeffrey Milarsky premiered his Out of the Loop (winner of a 2004 ASCAP Award) and So to Speak. In 2004, he orchestrated the movie The Manchurian Candidate for composer Rachel Portman and played on Björk’s album Medúlla as well as prepared and conducted her score for Matthew Barney's Drawing Restraint 9. As a performer, he plays piano and celeste and has performed with the Juilliard Orchestra, VisionIntoArt, John Adams, and Philip Glass. He is currently writing a work for the Choir of Men and Boys of Saint Thomas Church in New York City.

Chris Thompson: Asst. Music Director/Percussion

Abby Fischer: Soprano

Matt Hensrud: Tenor

Sam Amidon: Banjo

Nadia Sirota: Viola

LOST (AND FOUND) IN TRANSLATION STORIES: The MOTH with Eric Bogosian, Edith Grossman, Alan Rabinowitz, Michael Rips and Flash Rosenberg with host Paul Holdengräber

Monday, October 17, 2005, 6:30 p.m.

"Translation is the art of failure." -- Umberto Eco

"The most important thing in communication is to hear what isn't being said." -- Peter Drucker

"The original is unfaithful to the translation." -- Jorge Luis Borges

TRADUTTORE! TRADITORE! Is the translator a traitor Is it the translator who betrays his topic, the listener who will not hear, or is it as Flaubert wrote that language itself "is like a cracked kettle on which we tap crude rhythms for bears to dance to, while we long to make music that will melt the stars"? Join us as five storytellers explore the territory of high and low treason, good and bad translation, small- and large-scale infelicities and infidelities.

6:30 pm Doors Open

7:30 pm Stories Start on Stage

Storytellers:

Eric Bogosian
Edith Grossman
Alan Rabinowitz
Michael Rips
Flash Rosenberg

Host and Curator: Paul Holdengräber

Violin: Katy Cox

Artistic Director: Catherine Burns

Producer: Sarah Austin Jenness

Executive and Creative Director: Lea Than

About the Storytellers:

ERIC BOGOSIAN is the author of five full-length plays including Griller, Humpty Dumpty, Talk Radio (which was adapted to a film directed by Oliver Stone), and six full-length solos including Sex, Drugs, Rock & Roll, Pounding Nails in the Floor with My Forehead and Drinking in America. His second novel, Wasted Beauty, was recently published and his prose works include Mall and Notes from Underground. He's worked with directors including Robert Altman, Paul Schrader, Woody Allen, Taylor Hackford and Atom Egoyan, starred in films including Dolores Claiborne and Under Siege II.

EDITH GROSSMAN is widely recognized as the preeminent Spanish-to-English translator of our time. She has translated with equal elegance and apparent ease all of the work of Gabriel Garca Marquez (Love in the Time of Cholera to Memories of My Melancholy Whores) and her critically acclaimed recent translation of Miguel de Cervantes' Don Quixote.

Dr. ALAN RABINOWITZ is currently the Director of the Science and Exploration Division for the Wildlife Conservation Society based at the Bronx Zoo. Dubbed the "Indiana Jones" of wildlife science by The New York Times, Dr. Rabinowitz's work has resulted in the world's first jaguar sanctuary at Cockscomb Basin, Belize; the establishing of the Tawu Mountain Nature Reserve in Taiwan; the first field research on IndoChinese tigers, Asiatic leopards, and leopard cats in Thailand; and, in Myanmar, the creation of five new protected areas: the country's first marine national park, the country's first and largest Himalayan national park, the country's largest wildlife sanctuary, and the world's largest tiger reserve. He has published over 75 articles and 6 books including Jaguar, Chasing the Dragon's Tail, and Beyond the Last Village.

MICHAEL RIPS is a fifth-generation Nebraska native. A graduate of Oxford University, he has served as a law clerk to a Supreme Court justice, is now an adviser to several museums and foundations, and, when not writing in coffee shops around New York City, continues to practice criminal litigation. He is the author of The Face of a Naked Lady: An Omaha Family Mystery and Pasquale's Nose: Idle Days in an Italian Town. He lives at the Chelsea Hotel with his wife and daughter.

FLASH ROSENBERG cartoonist, writer, performer, romantic and turtle wrangler, whose most recent one-woman show, Know Flash Aloud, premiered at American Comic Vision Festival at Symphony Space. Her cartoons, essays and illustrations have appeared in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The New York Daily News, the Forward, The Funny Times and Lilith, where she earned American Jewish Press Association Awards for both writing and illustration. She was the illustrator and a cartoon contributor to the Random House compendium, Life's a Stitch: The Best of Contemporary Women's Humor and her award-winning motion picture Pulse of Desire composed of 7000 stills, screened internationally. She most recently taught photo-perception courses for Cooper Union including Underground Creativity conducted entirely in the subways, and Future Nostalgia: Documenting the Anticipated Past exploring how we encode raw experience into the gauze of memory.

Host and Curator:

PAUL HOLDENGR?BER is the Director of Public Programs - newly minted and now known as "LIVE from the NYPL" - for The New York Public Library. Paul is perfectly suited to host Lost in Translation. He was brought up simultaneously in four languages, speaks mostly with an accent, was brought up in many countries in old Europe, has Austrian parents and a Mexican sister. Paul was born in Houston Texas, and is often lost, both in translation and in the original. His jokes sometimes translate well and are often funnier when translated. At the NYPL his stated goal is to make the lions roar. This is the third event LIVE co-presents with The Moth. The Moth is contributing to the roar.

Violinist:
KATY COX is accomplished in classical, Eastern European Roma and bluegrass styles, and has performed in venues all over the US, from CBGB's to Carnegie Hall. She performs with several New York based groups including The Maybelles, Romashka, and The Dolomites. It has also been said that she was born with the extraordinary ability to "remove" long-winded storytellers from the stage with a mere stroke from her violin bow.

Co-sponsored with The Moth, the urban storytelling organization which has been called NYC's hottest and hippest literary ticket by The Wall Street Journal.

Sponsored by audible.com

Cocktails courtesy of Hendrick's

NOTES FROM UNDERGROUND: Patrice Chéreau at Symphony Space

Wednesday, October 12, 2005, 8 a.m.

Patrice Chéreau delivers Dostoyevsky's ferocious and imprecatory monologue Notes from Underground, a magnificent, full frontal assault on Enlightenment rationalism and the very idea of progress. In this extraordinary performance, Patrice Chéreau , a dazzling innovator and one of the most remarkable and celebrated directors in French theater and, lately, cinema, is supremely judicious in the intensity of every syllable and gesture, bringing Dostoyevsky's at once self-loathing and egocentric character, symbol of a generation living on borrowed time, vividly to life.

Performed in French with English Titles
French translation by André Markowicz

About Patrice Chéreau:

The expansive talent of Patrice Chéreau over the past four decades has earned him plaudits and prestige in the international arena ? from theatre to opera (including a now-legendary direction of Wagner's Ring in Bayreuth), to cinema. Following the worldwide success of Queen Margot (starring Isabelle Adjani) in 1994, and Intimacy in 1999, his new film, Gabrielle, opens this fall (with Isabelle Huppert). But Chéreau is as passionate as ever about theatre and literature. This new film coincides with his directorial return to the stage with a much-awaited Cosi fan tutte, and his own performance of a stripped-down reading of Notes from Underground, Dostoyevsky's diatribe to a generation living on borrowed time. A voice and a presence alone on a bare stage -- the roots of theatre.

Co-presented with Symphony Space and Act French

This performance is part of Act French: A Season of New Theater from France. Six months of intriguing ideas and performances from the frontlines of French culture in adventurous theaters citywide, July 15 - December 15, 2005, www.actfrench.org. Act French is made possible by the Cultural Services of the French Embassy in the United States, Association Fran?aise d?Action Artistique (AFAA), and The French Ministry of Culture and Communication.

WHEN THE WORLD GOES MAD: Simon Winchester

Thursday, October 6, 2005, 7 p.m.

"The natural catastrophes that have so afflicted the planet in this last year the Indian Ocean tsunami, the New Orleans Hurricane Katrina, and now Hurricane Rita have served to remind us of the fragility of humankind in the face of the wrath of the planet. The San Francisco earthquake of 1906 was another bitter example of this same collision between nature's whims and human ambition. It took just fifty seconds for the dreams of an entire nation to be crumpled into insignificance; a small seismic shrug that destroyed a city that stood as the ideal symbol of American brio and self-confidence.

But America and the world learned much from 1906, and began a course of scientific self-examination that has led, today, to a profound understanding of the manner in which the planet works. We now know why that earthquake occurred, and why, for that matter, the 2004 tsunami happened. We cannot predict when such things will happen again although we know full well that the northern Indian Ocean and Northern California are very dangerous places to live.

Before we gained this level of understanding, mankind inevitably turned to God to explain and to blame. In the wake of Hurricane Katrina there are new signs that America, frustrated by the ability either to predict or to deal with such catastrophes, is turning to God as a source of answers, yet again. Is this healthy? Is it something that will offer real solutions when for example, and as seems inevitable, San Francisco is ruined by an earthquake once again? Or is there a better way?

How should we really deal with the world when the world goes mad?"
Simon Winchester

The author discusses his latest book A Crack in the Edge of the World: America and the Great California Earthquake of 1906.

About Simon Winchester:

Simon Winchester is a journalist, writer and a trained geologist. Born in London and educated at Oxford, Winchester worked on oilrigs in the North Sea before turning his hand to journalism, writing as a correspondent for British newspapers around the world, covering stories from the Watergate affair to the Falklands War. In 1987 he became a full-time writer, exploring topics from the urbane to the catastrophic. His surprise best-seller The Professor and the Madman: A Tale of Murder, Insanity, and the Making of the Oxford English Dictionary tells an intriguing behind-the-scenes story of the writing of the Oxford English Dictionary, while his 2003 work Krakatoa: The Day the World Exploded, August 27, 1883 looks at a volcanic eruption that affected the entire world in the late nineteenth century. Other books from Winchester have examined topics from England's imperial past to the history of China. A thorough researcher, Winchester confessed to "research rapture" in an interview with the San Francisco Chronicle.

FOR THE CITY: Jenny Holzer light projections

Thursday, October 6, 2005, 7 p.m.

Jenny Holzer's light projections will illuminate the facade of the Library with poetry by Wislawa Szymborska, Yehuda Amichai, Henri Cole, Mahmoud Darwish, and other celebrated writers. The illuminated text will move across the nighttime facade, encompassing the reader with the power of language to educate and console. This event is part of citywide public projections on landmark New York City buildings. Poetry will be projected at Rockefeller Center on September 29 - October 2 and declassified United States government documents released under the Freedom of Information Act will be projected at Bobst Library, New York University, on October 3 - October 5.

About Jenny Holzer:

For more than twenty-five years, Jenny Holzer has presented her astringent ideas, arguments, and sorrows in public places and international exhibitions, including the Venice Biennale, the Reichstag, and the Guggenheim Museums in New York and Bilbao. Her medium, whether formulated as a t-shirt, as a plaque, or as an LED sign, is writing, and the public dimension is integral to the delivery of her work. Starting in the late 1970s with the New York City posters, and up to her recent xenon projections on landscape and architecture, her practice has rivaled ignorance and violence with humor, kindness, and moral courage. Holzer received the Leone d?Oro at the Venice Biennale in 1990 and the Public Art Network Award in 2004. She holds honorary degrees from the University of Ohio, Williams College, and the Rhode Island School of Design. Holzer lives and works in Hoosick, New York.

Presented in collaboration with CREATIVE TIME.
www.creativetime.org

REREADINGS: Anne Fadiman, David Michaelis and David Samuels with moderator André Aciman

Tuesday, September 27, 2005, 7 p.m.

Like romantic love, early book-love is ecstatic. As a young reader curls up with a novel, its fictional characters seem real, while the real world pales into comparative insignificance. Can that ecstasy be recaptured? Is a book--or a reader--the same the second time around? In an evening of conversation for bibliophiles, Anne Fadiman will explore the emotionally charged topic of rerereading along with David Samuels and David Michaelis, two of the authors who contributed to REREADINGS: Seventeen Writers Revisit Books They Love, a witty and poignant collection of essays that Fadiman selected and edited. André Aciman will moderate.

Moderator André Aciman muses: "The books I read once changed me more than the books I read today. I reread old books not only to rediscover what was so special about them, but to recover the kind of starstruck reader I was then."

About Anne Fadiman:

Anne Fadiman is the Francis Writer in Residence at Yale University. She is the author of Ex Libris and The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down. She was awarded the National Book Critics Circle Award. In her introduction to Rereadings, Fadiman compared rereading to remeeting an old lover and described the bittersweet experience of reading one of C.S. Lewis's Narnia books to her eight-year-old son.

About David Michaelis:

David Michaelis's contribution to Rereadings is a memorable riff on the lyrics featured on the back of the Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band by the Beatles in "The Back of the Album." He is the author of N. C. Wyeth: A Biography, winner of the 1999 Ambassador Book Award for Biography, given by the English-Speaking Union of the United States. His previous books include a collection of biographical sketches, The Best of Friends. Michaelis's work has appeared in Vanity Fair, Conde Nast Traveler, American Heritage, and The New York Observer, for which he regularly reviews books; he is currently working on a biography of Charles M. Schulz. He lives in New York City.

About David Samuels:

David Samuels contributed an essay on rereading J.D. Salinger's Franny and Zooey entitled "Marginal Notes on the Inner Lives of People with Cluttered Apartments in the East Seventies." He also has written about atom bombs, dog tracks, anarchists, rappers, forgers, demolition men, and religious visionaries for Harper's Magazine (of which he is a contributing editor), The New Yorker, and other publications. He and his wife live in Brooklyn, next to a mosque.

About André Aciman:

André Aciman is the author of Out of Egypt, False Papers, and the co-author and editor of The Proust Project and of Letters of Transit. He was born in Alexandria and lived in Egypt, Italy, and France. Educated at Harvard University, he has taught at Princeton University and Bard College and teaches Comparative Literature at The CUNY Graduate Center. He is the recipient of a Whiting Writers' Award, a Guggenheim Fellowship as well as a fellowship from The New York Public Library's Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers. He has written for The New York Times, The New Yorker, The New Republic, and Commentary.

JOE LOUIS vs MAX SCHMELING: How A Two-Minute Boxing Event Altered History A Conversation with David Margolick and Jeremy Schaap

Monday, September 26, 2005, 7 p.m.

Perhaps no moment in the history of sports was followed so intensely, and by so many people in so many places, as the two minutes and four seconds Joe Louis-Max Schmeling fight on June 22, 1938. The largest radio audience ever gathered, and gasped, as heavyweight champion Louis avenged his loss to the German Schmeling two years earlier, for far more than sports was at stake; it was black versus white, American versus German and, to millions of people on the eve of World War II and the Holocaust, freedom versus fascism. To the Nazis, Schmeling embodied a resurgent Germany, along with Aryan superiority; to blacks, Louis fired up race pride and foreshadowed an insipient civil rights movement in America. And to Jews, both in the United States and Europe, Louis became the first figure to stand up to Hitler, or at least to a fighter Hitler embraced. On September 26, 2005, the unforgettable 1938 original radio broadcast of Louis's stunning victory will be aired.

The story is told in Margolick's new book, Beyond Glory: Joe Louis vs. Max Schmeling, and a World on the Brink. David Margolick, a contributing editor at Vanity Fair, has come to specialize in epic, two-minute chunks of history particularly the 1930s; his last book, Strange Fruit: The Biography of a Song, was about Billie Holiday's classic anti-lynching anthem. He will be in conversation with Jeremy Schaap of ESPN, author of Cinderella Man.

About David Margolick:

David Margolick is a longtime contributing editor at Vanity Fair, where he writes about culture, the media, and politics. He also served as national legal affairs editor at The New York Times, where he wrote the weekly "At the Bar" column for seven years. His new book is Beyond Glory: Joe Louis vs. Max Schmeling, and a World on the Brink. Previously, he wrote Strange Fruit: The Biography of a Song.

About Jeremy Schaap:

Jeremy Schaap, ESPN anchor and national correspondent, is a host of ESPN?s Outside the Lines, an issues-oriented news show and its acclaimed SportsCentury series. An Emmy Award-winning reporter, he has appeared on ABC?s World News Tonight and the CBS Evening News and has been published in Sports Illustrated, ESPN: the Magazine, Time, Parade, and The New York Times. He is the author of Cinderella Man.

ON VULGARITY: Adam Gopnik and Pascal Bruckner

Thursday, September 22, 2005, 7 p.m.

In the indictment brought against modernity, "the French philosopher and novelist Pascal Bruckner writes," the presence of vulgarity has cropped up time and again, having spread together with social mobility and the ideas of egalitarianism -- a sign of the times when hierarchies are supposedly abolished and everyone is given equal opportunities, including culturally."

Bruckner will talk about vulgarity as a strategy of social advancement, and, paradoxically, as a potential strategy of aesthetic achievement, emphasizing the power of the repressed and the previously excluded. He will be in conversation with writer and New Yorker magazine contributor Adam Gopnik in a debate about the meaning and value of a term that has become, well, vulgar, even to mention. The debate promises to sweep on to larger issues of American and French cultural exchange.

About Adam Gopnik:

Adam Gopnik, New Yorker staff writer and author of Paris To The Moon, lived in Paris with his family from 1995 to 2000 and wrote the magazine's "Paris Journals," prompting the French newspaper Le Monde to regard him as a "witty and Voltairean commentator on French life." He is co-author of the book High and Low: Modern Art and Popular Culture and his awards include the National Magazine Award for Essay and Criticism and the George Polk Award for Magazine Reporting. The King in the Window, a children?s book, will be published this Fall.

About Pascal Bruckner:

Pascal Bruckner is an acclaimed essayist and novelist, whose Bitter Moon was made into a film by Roman Polanski. His other works include The Temptation of Innocence: Living in the Age of Entitlement, Lunes de fiel, Parias, and The Tears of the White Man: Compassion As Contempt. He was awarded the prestigious Acad?mie Fran?aise Prix 2000 and Medici Prize 1995 for Essays.

Voices of A People's History of the United States: Howard Zinn and Anthony Arnove

Wednesday, September 21, 2005, 7 p.m.

An evening of dramatic readings from Voices of a People's History of the United States, edited by Howard Zinn and Anthony Arnove. Voices is the long-awaited primary-source companion volume to Zinn's best-selling A People's History of the United States. It features the words of rebels, dissenters, and visionaries from our past -- and present. Featuring Howard Zinn (narrator) and Anthony Arnove (narrator), with actors Wally Shawn, Kerry Washington, Brian Jones and Christina Kirk and others to be announced!

About Howard Zinn:

Howard Zinn is a historian, playwright, and social activist. He was a shipyard worker and Air Force bombardier before he received his Ph.D. from Columbia University. He has taught at Spelman College and Boston University, and has been a visiting professor at the University of Paris and the University of Bologna. He has received the Thomas Merton Award, the Eugene V. Debs Award, the Upton Sinclair Award, and the Lannan Literary Award. His books include Howard Zinn on Democratic Education, The Zinn Reader: Writings on Disobedience and Democracy and You Can't Be Neutral on a Moving Train. He is perhaps best known for A People's History of the United States, which presents American history through the eyes of those he feels are outside of the political and economic establishment.

About Wally Shawn:

Wallace Shawn is the author of Marie and Bruce, Aunt Dan and Lemon, The Fever, The Designated Mourner, and other plays. He has made notable appearances in films such as Starting Over, All That Jazz, Lovesick, and My Dinner With Andre. Many people believe the film version of Marie and Bruce will be released in 2005. Shawn is the editor of the magazine Final Edition, whose first (and last) issue has appeared, featuring works by Deborah Eisenberg, Jonathan Schell, and Mark Strand, with an interview of Noam Chomsky by the editor.

About Anthony Arnove:

Anthony Arnove is the editor, with Howard Zinn, of Voices of a People?s History of the United States. He is also the editor of Terrorism and War with Howard Zinn and Iraq Under Siege. He is a regular contributor to ZNet, and his writing has also appeared in The Nation, Financial Times, International Socialist Review, L'Humanite, Le Nouvelle Observateur, and other publications. Arnove is a member of the International Socialist Organization and the National Writers Union.

About Brian Jones:

Brian Jones studied Acting and Directing in Brown University's Department of Theater, Speech, and Dance. Brian Jones has toured across the country as Marx in Howard Zinn's one-man play Marx in Soho since 1999. He recently lent his voice to the audio recording of Noam Chomsky's new book, Hegemony or Survival. He is a teacher in Harlem, a member of the United Federation of Teachers, Teachers for a Just Contract, and the International Socialist Organization.

About Christina Kirk:

Christina Kirk has appeared in several critically acclaimed theater productions, including [sic] at the Soho Rep, Worldly Acts (Urban Empire), Stage Door (HERE), Cruel and Barbarous Treatment (Gloucester Stage), and David Auburn's Fifth Planet (New York Stage and Film Workshop). She is currently performing in The Civilians at PS122. Her film credits include John Hamburg's Safe Men, Final, directed by Campbell Scott, and the upcoming Bug. She is a graduate of Brown University.

About Kerry Washington:

Winner for ?Outstanding Actress in a Motion Picture? for Ray at the NAACP Image Awards in 2005 and Nominated for her an Independent Spirit Award for "Best Actress" in the film Lift in 2002, Kerry Washington is proving to be one of the busiest actresses in Hollywood. She has just completed filming the Last King of Scotland with Forest Whitaker in Uganda and can be seen this summer in 20th Century Fox Studios Mr. and Mrs. Smith, starring Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie, and Fantastic Four, directed by Tim Story and based on the beloved Marvel comics superheroes.

THE PATRIOT ACT: Richard Posner and Geoffrey Stone

Tuesday, September 20, 2005, 7 p.m.

Richard Posner, Judge at the U.S. Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals and Geoffrey Stone, Professor of Law at the University of Chicago Law School and expert on constitutional law, debate the renewal of the Patriot Act. Posner and Stone will discuss the Patriot Act, the Bush administration's surveillance of library records and its investigation of political and religious organizations, and the question whether a democracy must tolerate speech that glorifies and purports to justify terrorism.

About Richard Posner:

Richard Posner is a graduate of Harvard Law School and lectures at University of Chicago School of Law. He was appointed in 1981 as a judge of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit. He was the chief judge of the court from 1993 to 2000. Judge Posner has written a number of books, including Economic Analysis of Law; The Economics of Justice; Law and Literature; Law, Pragmatism, and Democracy; Catastrophe: Risk and Response; Preventing Surprise Attacks: Intelligence Reform in the Wake of 9/11. He has also written books about the Clinton impeachment and Bush v. Gore, and many articles in legal and economic journals and book reviews in the popular press. He has received a number of awards, most recently the Learned Hand Medal for Excellence in Federal Jurisprudence from the Federal Bar Council, and the Thomas C. Schelling Award from the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University.

About Geoffrey Stone:

Geoffrey Stone, the Harry Kalven Jr. Distinguished Service Professor of Law at the University of Chicago, was dean of the law school from 1987 to 1994 and provost of the University from 1994 to 2002. He represented Fred Korematsu in an amicus curiae brief in the Supreme Court of the United States in the Guant?namo Bay case. Mr. Stone is currently chief editor of a fifteen-volume series, Inalienable Rights, which will be published between 2006 and 2010. He is working on a new book, Sexing the Constitution. His past works include Eternally Vigilant: Free Speech in the Modern Era, The Bill of Rights in the Modern State (with Richard Epstein and Cass Sunstein), Constitutional Law (with Cass Sunstein), and The First Amendment (with Cass Sunstein), and Perilous Times: Free Speech in Wartime From the Sedition Act of 1798 to the War on Terrorism.

A Celebration of The Paris Review : Salman Rushdie, Philip Gourevitch and Miranda July with The Hungry March Band

Saturday, September 17, 2005, 7 p.m.

Come celebrate the roll-out of the first issue! It's taller, it's trimmer, its shoulders are broader-- The Paris Review , long the heavyweight champion of literary magazines, has been redesigned and revitalized for the new century under the editorship of Philip Gourevitch. Gourevitch will join LIVE from the NYPL for an evening of conversation with, and reading by, Salman Rushdie, subject of the Art of Fiction interview in the current issue of The Paris Review, and Miranda July, contributor to The Paris Review Book of People with Problems published by Picador.

And in keeping with the magazine's late editor George Plimpton's taste for high kicking can-can dancers, The Paris Review and LIVE from the NYPL crowd will be joined at 6:30 pm by The Hungry March Band!

Co-presented with The Paris Review and Picador.

About Salman Rushdie:

Salman Rushdie's most recent book is Shalimar the Clown. He has written eight previous novels ? Grimus, Midnight's Children (for which he won the Booker Prize and the ?Booker of Bookers?), Shame, The Satanic Verses, Haroun and the Sea of Stories, The Moor's Last Sigh, The Ground Beneath Her Feet, and Fury and one collection of short stories, East, West. He has also published five works of nonfiction: The Jaguar Smile, Imaginary Homelands, The Wizard of Oz, Mirrorwork, and Step Across This Line. He has served as honorary Vice-President, Member Trustee-at-Large, and now President of PEN American Center. He was also a founder and first President of the International Parliament of Writers.

About Philip Gourevitch:

Philip Gourevitch is editor of The Paris Review and a well-known author and long-time staff writer of The New Yorker. His book, We Wish To Inform You That Tomorrow We Will Be Killed With Our Families: Stories from Rwanda has won numerous prizes, including a National Book Critics Circle Award, a Los Angeles Times Book Prize, a George Polk Book Award, and in Britain, the Guardian First Book Award. His book, A Cold Case, is being adapted for the screen by Tom Hanks and Universal Pictures. His books have appeared in translation in ten languages.

About Miranda July:

Miranda July makes movies, performances, recordings and combinations of these things. Her work has appeared at the Museum of Modern Art, the Guggenheim Museum, The Kitchen, the 2002 and 2004 Whitney Biennials, and the Institute of Contemporary Art in London. July's stories have been published in The Paris Review and The Harvard Review and her radio performances can be heard regularly on NPR's The Next Big Thing. July's first feature-length film, Me and You and Everyone We Know received a special jury prize at the 2005 Sundance Film Festival and was awarded the Camera d'Or at the Cannes Film Festival. Her story "Birthmark" is included in The Paris Review book of People with Problems just out from Picador (2005).

About The Hungry Band:

The HMB is a 25-piece Brass March Band based in Brooklyn. They are a community-based group with a membership as diverse as the music they play. Their musical repertoire consists of original compositions written by band members as well as songs from New Orleans street bands, European brass traditions, Gypsy/Roma classics, wedding brass bands from India, and the jazz world. The band is an ever evolving musical experiment influenced and inspired from Brooklyn's backyard with Latin flavor, Klezmer sounds, polish jigs, punk rock noise, hip hop beats and music of the streets. A blazing parade of flesh, blood, steel, brass and wood, The Hungry March Band is the music of the people!

WOMEN OF MYSTERY: Nancy Drew Revisited. A Conversation with Melanie Rehak and Laura Lippman with moderator David Ferriero

Wednesday, September 14, 2005, 7 p.m.

A look at Nancy Drew and the whole idea of female investigators with Cullman Center Fellow Melanie Rehak, author of Girl Sleuth: Nancy Drew and the Women Who Created Her, and Laura Lippman, prize-winning author of the Tess Monaghan mystery series and To The Power of Three. David Ferriero, the Andrew W. Mellon Director and Chief Executive of the Research Libraries, NYPL, will moderate. Co-presented with The Dorothy & Lewis B. Cullman Center for Scholars & Writers.

About Melanie Rehak: Melanie Rehak was a 2003-2004 Mel and Lois Tukman Fellow at the New York Public Library's Dorothy and Lewis B. Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers, where she did much of the research for Girl Sleuth. She writes for The New York Times Magazine, Vogue, and The Nation, among other publications, and her poetry has been published in The New Yorker and The Paris Review. She lives in Brooklyn.

About Laura Lippman: Laura Lippman was a newspaper reporter at the Baltimore Sun for twelve years. Her Tess Monaghan novels -- The Last Place, The Sugar House, Baltimore Blues, Charm City, Butchers Hill, and In Big Trouble -- have won the Edgar, Agatha, Shamus, Anthony, and Nero Wolfe Awards, and In a Strange City was named a New York Times Notable Book of the Year. She is also the author of the critically acclaimed novel Every Secret Thing. Her most recent release is To the Power of Three. Lippman lives in Baltimore, Maryland.

About David Ferriero: David Ferriero is the Andrew W. Mellon Director and Chief Executive of the Research Libraries at The New York Public Library. Serving in this capacity, Mr. Ferriero is in charge of moving the four world-renowned Research Libraries into the 21st century. The Humanities and Social Sciences Library, The Science Industry and Business Library, The Library for the Performing Arts, and the Schomburg Center for Black Culture are key institutions in information dissemination. Mr. Ferriero joined the staff of the New York Public Library in 2004 after 8 years at Duke University and 31 years in the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Libraries.

Harold Bloom & Walt Whitman's Leaves of Grass

Monday, September 12, 2005, 7 p.m.

OPENING NIGHT: Literary critic extraordinaire Harold Bloom at 75 and Leaves of Grass at 150. A double birthday celebration with Bloom paying tribute to the poet Walt Whitman for "the most extraordinary piece of wit and wisdom that America has yet contributed" (in the words of Ralph Waldo Emerson). Joining him are actors Michael Stuhlbarg (Tony nomination for Pillowman) and Michael Rogers who will read selected stanzas from Song of Myself. Karin Coonrod will direct the event.

About Harold Bloom:

Harold Bloom is Sterling Professor of Humanities at Yale University, where he has taught since 1955. His thirty books include The Anxiety of Influence, The Book of J, The Western Cannon, How to Read and Why, Shakespeare: The Invention of the Human, Where Shall Wisdom Be Found?, Genius, and The Names Divine: Jesus and Yahweh. He has received the Gold Medal for Criticism from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, and the International Prize of Catalonia, the Alfonso Reyes Prize of Mexico, and the Hans Christian Andersen Bicentennial Prize of Denmark.

About Karin Coonrod:

Karin Coonrod has created memorable productions off-Broadway, nationally and internationally. Her range includes working with Shakespeare?s texts, the surrealists, prose and poetry texts to creating ex nihilo outside the box. High points include Victor or Children Take Over, Henry VI, The House of Bernarda Alba, Everything That Rises Must Converge, and Dangerous Clowns. With Harold Bloom she created the text of The Falstaffiad and directed a concert reading in which Bloom played Falstaff. Her international theater company, Compagnia Colombari, will create Laude in Urbis. Coonrod teaches Shakespeare at the Yale School of Drama and is currently preparing Mycenean with Carl Hancock Rux to be presented at BAM Festival 2006.

About Michael Rogers:
Michael Rogers was born in the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago. He has worked around the country and internationally. Mr. Rogers is a graduate of the Yale School of Drama.

Michael Stuhlbarg:
Michael Stuhlbarg was nominated for a 2005 Tony Award and won the 2005 Drama Desk Award for best Featured Actor in a Play as Michal in Martin McDonagh's play, The Pillowman, which culminates on September 18th after a six month run. His other Broadway credits include The Invention of Love, Cabaret, and Taking Sides. He has worked extensively off Broadway, regionally, and in film and television.

The Moth with Andy Borowitz UP, DOWN, IN, OUT: Stories About Class in America

Wednesday, June 15, 2005, 6:30 p.m.

THIS EVENT IS SOLD OUT.
In a classless society how do we define the all-pervasive pecking order Is it zip codes, pocketbooks, pedigrees, Ph.D.s, BMWs or BMIs that distinguish top from bottom and in from out Is class in America a question of where we were born, or what we give birth to? A function of how much we earn...or how hard we yearn? Come hear stories of haves and have-nots, the in-crowd and the out-castes. Join us as we welcome The Moth, the urban storytelling organization, which has been called "New York's hottest and hippest literary ticket" by The Wall Street Journal.

Drinks @ 6:30 PM
7:30 Showtime

Stories told by:
Victoria Adisa
Jamie Johnson
Lewis H. Lapham
Jeff MacGregor
Jeannette Walls

Hosted by:
Andy Borowitz

Violin:
Katy Cox

Curated by:
Rick Marin and Paul Holdengräber.

About the Storytellers:
Victoria Adisa was born in Lagos and is originally from the Toruba tribe of Southern Nigeria. She studied at the Ogun State School of Nursing and worked as a nurse for six years before marrying a man from the Hausa tribe in the Northern part of Nigeria and starting a family. After she and her family endured years of severe political and religious persecution, Victoria fled Nigeria in the fall of 2001 and sought asylum in the United States.

Andy Borowitz (host) is a comedian, actor and writer whose work appears regularly in The New Yorker,The New York Times, The Los Angeles Times and at Newsweek.com. He is the first winner of the National Press Club's humor award and has won five Dot-Comedy Awards for his website, borowitzreport.com. He appears on National Public Radio?s Weekend Edition Sunday, CNN's American Morning, VH1?s Best Week Ever and has acted in the films: Marie and Bruce starring Julianne Moore and Matthew Broderick and Melinda and Melinda starring Will Ferrell and directed by Woody Allen. He is the author of four humor books, including Who Moved My Soap: The CEO?s Guide to Surviving in Prison, and The Borowitz Report: The Big Book of Shockers. He was a 2001 Finalist for the Thurber prize for American Humor for this book The Trillionaire Next Door.

Jamie Johnson is the director of Born Rich, a film that explores the subject of money as seen through his experiences as the heir to the Johnson & Johnson fortune and those of his peers. The highly acclaimed documentary was chosen as an official selection at the Sundance Film Festival, broadcast on HBO and received two Emmy nominations. He is currently working on a follow up documentary to Born Rich.

Paul Holdengraber (co-presenter) is the new Director of Public Programs--newly minted and now known as "LIVE from the NYPL"--for the New York Public Library. His goal is to make the lions roar. This is the second event LIVE co-presents together with the MOTH. The MOTH is contributing to the roar.

Lewis H. Lapham is the editor of Harper's Magazine where he writes "Notebook," a monthly essay for which he won a 1995 National Magazine Award. His books of essays (Fortune's Child, Money and Class in America, Imperial Masquerade, Hotel America, The Wish for Kings, and Waiting for the Barbarians) have prompted The New York Times to liken him to H. L. Mencken. He is also the author of The Agony of Mammon, Lapham's Rules of Influence and Theater of War , and he has written for many esteemed print publications. He has lectured at many of the nation's leading universities, and he wrote and performed in The American Ruling Class, a documentary premiered at the 2005 Tribeca Film Festival.

Jeff MacGregor is the author of Sunday Money: A Hot Lap Around America with Nascar. He is a special contributor to Sports Illustrated magazine and a six-time National Magazine Award nominee. He writes frequently for the New York Times, and his fiction has appeared in Story and Esquire.

Rick Marin (curator) is a pop-culture critic and a senior writer at Newsweek. Formerly a reporter for the New York Times Sunday Styles, he is the author of Cad: Confessions of a Toxic Bachelor.

Jeanette Walls is the author of The New York Times best selling memoir, The Glass Castle. She is a regular contributor to MSNBC and has worked at several publications including Esquire, USA Today and New York Magazine.

Katy Cox (violinist) is accomplished in classical, pop and bluegrass styles, and has performed in venues all over the US, from CBGB?s to Carnegie Hall. She is presently the fiddler for three bands: the traditional bluegrass bands BrooklynBrowngrass and the Nieces and Nephews, and the hardcore bluegrass punk band Uncle F****er. She is also a documentary filmmaker and is currently directing The Making of the Museum of Sex in New York City.

The Question Of Torture

Wednesday, June 1, 2005, 7 p.m.

Art as Unauthorized Autobiography A Conversation with Richard Dreyfuss & Frederic Morton moderated by David Margolick

Thursday, May 26, 2005, 7 p.m.

Richard Dreyfuss won the Academy Award for Best Actor for his performance in "The Goodbye Girl" at age 29 and later was nominated for his role in "Mr. Holland's Opus." Much of his life has been spent as a political and social activist. He was recently appointed to the Council on Foreign Relations.

Frederic Morton is a two-time National Book Award finalist for The Rothschilds and A Nervous Splendor. Now, in his first book in over fifteen years, Morton writes about his own departure from Vienna and his subsequent life in America with Runaway Waltz: A Memoir from Vienna to New York.

David Margolick is contributing editor at Vanity Fair and a former law columnist for The New York Times. He is author of Beyond Glory: Joe Louis vs. Max Schmeling, and a World on the Brink, a book to be published in September 2005.

Isabel Allende & Elissa Schappell Unmask ZORRO!

Wednesday, May 25, 2005, 7 p.m.

"Who was Zorro, the masked avenger? Why is he beloved by everybody?especially young women?and why is he still relevant today? Please join Zorro, Elissa Schappell and me for an evening of literature, swashbuckling and fun!"
--Isabel Allende

About Isabel Allende:

In Zorro, Isabel Allende offers a fresh, wholly original take on the legendary masked hero of the Spanish New World examining the duality of a man who inhabits two worlds. She has also completed her trilogy for younger readers begun in City of the Beasts, and followed by last year's Kingdom of the Golden Dragon?with Forest of the Pygmies. Born in Peru and raised in Chile, she lives in California.

About Elissa Schappell:

Elissa Schappell's most recent book, edited with Jenny Offill, is The Friend Who Got Away: Twenty Women's True Life Tales of Friendships that Blew Up, Burned Out or Faded Away. She is also a contributing editor and book columnist for Vanity Fair; co-founder of Tin House magazine; and formerly a senior editor for The Paris Review.

Isabel Allende & Elissa Schappell Unmask ZORRO! is this year's Salomon Lecture, an annual event made possible by an endowed fund established by the friends and associates of the late Richard B. Salomon.

In the Shadow of Liberty: Emma Lazarus Revisited

Tuesday, May 17, 2005, 7 p.m.

A conversation with John Hollander and Esther Schor
The 2005 Joy Ungerleider Lecture

Emma Lazarus, poet, radical ideologue of Jewish national destiny, and fifth-generation New Yorker, was the first American-Jewish writer to win international fame. Trumpeted during her life by Emerson, Turgenev, and Browning, with her death in 1887, at age 38, everything else she ever did was eclipsed by just a few words very prominently displayed-engraved on the base of the Statue of Liberty in New York harbor. As she became world-famous for her "huddled masses," the rest of her work disappeared from consciousness. Join Hollander and Schor, leading scholars of 19th century poetry and prominent poets themselves, as they delve into the obscurity and reclaim what we have mislaid.

Poet and MacArthur fellow John Hollander is Sterling Professor Emeritus of English at Yale and the editor of American Poetry: The Nineteenth Century (1993), American Wits: An Anthology of Light Verse (2003), and Emma Lazarus: Selected Poems (2005), all for The Library of America. Poet Esther Schor is Professor of English at Princeton and author of Bearing the Dead: The British Culture of Mourning From the Enlightenment to Victoria. Her biography of Emma Lazarus will appear next year.

The Joy Ungerleider Lecture, an annual program of the 42nd Street Library's Dorot Jewish Division, is made possible by the support of the Dorot Foundation.

A Conversation About The Art Of Conversation

Wednesday, May 11, 2005, 7 p.m.

In the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, between the reign of Louis XIII and the Revolution, the French nobility of the "ancien regime" developed an art of sociability in which new forms of conversation were central. Four centuries separate us from this period. Conversation isn't what is used to be and yet, writes Benedetta Craveri, "What could be more necessary in democratic societies than conversation consisting of an exchange in which participants are considered equal, where the pursuit of truth is combined with respect for others' opinions, and whose ultimate goal is the pleasure of sharing knowledge?"

Join us for a conversation with:

Benedetta Craveri, author of "The Age of Conversation" (New York Review Books, May 2005.)

Paul LeClerc, President of The New York Public Library.

Anka Muhlstein, author of "Memoirs of the Comtesse de Boigne & Astolphe de Custine: The Last French Aristocrat".

Miss Manners (Judith Martin) & Bob Morris Let's Put Manners on You

Tuesday, May 10, 2005, 7 p.m.

Judith Martin (a.k.a. Miss Manners) discusses modern etiquette?her "freshly updated" Miss Manner's Guide to Excruciatingly Correct Behavior has just been re-issued by Norton?with Bob Morris, the edgy, hardboiled writer and novelist regularly published in The New York Times Style pages. Expect Martin and Morris to debate about the refined, the uncouth and more.

About Judith Martin:

Widely admired and slightly feared "Miss Manners" is America's leading etiquette expert, reaches 35.8 million readers with "Miss Manners" columns syndicated in nationwide newspapers, magazines, and on the Internet. She has written several best-selling books on etiquette and society, as well as two novels. Born a perfect lady in an imperfect society, Mrs. Martin lives in Washington, DC with her husband. Their children are now grown-up, but still perfect.

About Bob Morris:

As the "Age of Dissonance" columnist for the New York Times Sunday Styles section, Bob Morris critiques and comments upon all aspects of contemporary manners in a highly aspirational and rude society. On radio, he has been a commentator on NPR's "All Things Considered" and his writing has appeared in the New Yorker, the NY Times Magazine and other publications. He is a contributing editor at Travel and Leisure, a playwright, and the author of Crispin The Terrible, a picture book for children and Delia at the Delano, a picture book for adults who don't like to read. He is currently at work on a book of complaints.

Eric Bogosian

Wednesday, May 4, 2005, 9 p.m.

Come to our first Late Night at the NYPL: A Conversation with Eric Bogosian & Co.

"A New Literacy"

Has literature become an old-fashioned (and worn-out) medium? Should writers still be considered "authors?" Or are they simply worker bees participating in a much larger context? Is everything written simply as a pretext for the future screenplay? Is there such a thing as point of view and can it still be transmitted to an audience via prose and dramatic writing? Where does the enthusiasm for the written word lie today? Comic books? Hip-hop lyrics? In the vast universe of the corporate-controlled written word, has the romantic notion of artistry been lost?

Five Authors

Four preeminent voices in the theater:
Eric Bogosian Talk Radio subUrbia
John Guare Atlantic City, Six Degrees of Separation
John Patrick Shanley Moonstruck, Doubt
Stephen Adly Guirgis Jesus Hopped the A Train, The Last Days of Judas Iscariot

An editor at DC/VERTIGO, the premiere graphic novel publisher & author:
Jonathan Vankin Vertigo Pop-Bangkok, Witching

The Moth with Jonathan Ames Between the Covers

Wednesday, April 27, 2005, 6:30 p.m.

In the beginning, there was the Word...
For all those who worship at the altar of language; for those whose daily divinities are measured in chapters, not chants; we invite you to the High Holy Temple of Text, The New York Public Library, to celebrate the nourishment of the written word. Join us as we welcome The Moth, the urban storytelling organization, which has been called "New York's hottest and hippest literary ticket" by The Wall Street Journal. Five Moth storytellers will explore whether it is we who shape the words, or the words that mystically shape us.

Drinks @ 6:30 PM
7:30 Showtime

Stories told by:
Joe Lockhart
Calvin Miles
David Rakoff
And other special guests!

Hosted by:
Jonathan Ames

Violin:
Katy Cox

Curated by:
Terri Galvin
Jenifer Hixson
Paul Holdengräber

About the Storytellers:
Jonathan Ames (host), a writer and performer, is the author of I Pass Like Night, The Extra Man, What's Not to Love?, My Less Than Secret Life, and Wake Up, Sir! He is the editor of the recently published Sexual Metamorphosis: Anthology of Transsexual Memoirs and he is the winner of a Guggenheim Fellowship. He is a recurring guest on the Late Show with David Letterman, and his comedic memoir What's Not to Love? was filmed as a TV pilot for the Showtime network. Mr. Ames wrote the script and played himself, which was a stretch but he pulled it off. His novels The Extra Man and Wake Up Sir! are in development as films with screenplays by Mr. Ames. Visit his website at www.jonathanames.com.

Joe Lockhart served as White House Press Secretary and Senior Advisor to President Clinton from 1998-2000, where he conducted daily press conferences for White House journalists, and briefed the President and senior members of his Administration on all press matters. From 1991 to 1995 he was Executive Vice-President at Bozell Sawyer Miller advising clients, including Microsoft and Coca-Cola. Before joining the White House in 1997, he was National Press Secretary for the Clinton/Gore '96 re-election campaign. He was the Deputy Press Secretary for the Dukakis/Bentsen '88 presidential campaign, traveling with the nominee. In 1984, he was Assistant Press Secretary for the Mondale/Ferraro campaign and during the 1980 Carter/Mondale campaign he was a Regional Press Coordinator. Lockhart has also held key positions at SKY Television News of London, Cable News Network (CNN), and ABC Network News. He is currently a Partner with The Glover Park Group who specializes in media relations and political strategy.

Calvin Miles was born in 1942 in Gadsten, North Carolina, where he spent two decades working as a farmer before moving to New York City. He is on the Board of Directors of The Grassroots Literacy Coalition (www.glcnyc.org) where he serves as Co-Chairman and is president of Voice for Literacy United for Education. Miles has two sons and three grandchildren. He is the author of the book Calvin's Christmas Wish (Puffin Books).

David Rakoff is the author of the books Fraud and the forthcoming Don't Get Too Comfortable (Doubleday, September 2005). A regular contributor to Public Radio International's This American Life, GQ, and The New York Times Magazine, he can be seen this fall in the films Strangers With Candy, starring Amy Sedaris and Capote, starring Philip Seymour Hoffman.

Katy Cox (violinist) is accomplished in classical, pop and bluegrass styles, and has performed in venues all over the US, from CBGB's to Carnegie Hall. She is presently the fiddler for three bands: the traditional bluegrass bands BrooklynBrowngrass and the Nieces and Nephews, and the hardcore bluegrass punk band Uncle F******. She is also a documentary filmmaker and is currently directing The Making of the Museum of Sex in New York City.

Derek Walcott and Glyn Maxwell Poetry and Power

Tuesday, April 26, 2005, 7 p.m.

Dramatist and poet Derek Walcott, who received the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1992, discusses translation and the postcolonial mind with one of Walcott's former students, Glyn Maxwell, a writer and the poetry editor of The New Republic.

Derek Walcott was born in 1930 in the town of Castries in Saint Lucia, one of the Windward Islands in the Lesser Antilles. The experience of growing up on the isolated volcanic island, an ex-British colony, has had a strong influence on Walcott's life and work. After studying at St. Mary's College in his native island and at the University of the West Indies in Jamaica, Walcott moved in 1953 to Trinidad, where he has worked as a theatre and art critic. At the age of 18, he made his debut with 25 Poems, but his breakthrough came with the collection of poems, In a Green Night (1962). In 1959, he founded the Trinidad Theatre Workshop which produced many of his early plays. He was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1992 "for a poetic oeuvre of great luminosity, sustained by a historical vision, the outcome of a multicultural commitment." His most recent book-length poem: The Prodigal: A poem, was published in 2004. The work was inspired by the death of Derek's twin brother, Roderick Walcott, at the age of 71.

Glyn Maxwell was born in 1962 in Welwyn Garden City, England. He read English at Oxford University and won a scholarship to Boston University where he studied on the poetry and drama courses taught by Derek Walcott. He moved to the USA in 1996, teaching first at Amherst College, Massachusetts, then at Columbia University and The New School in New York City. In 1997 he was awarded the E. M. Forster Award by the American Academy of Arts and Letters. He was appointed Poetry Editor at the New Republic in 2001, and is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature. His upcoming book, The Sugar Mile, is written in the extended verse narrative and juxtaposes two cities on the brink of irrevocable change. The Sugar Mile begins when the poet steps into an uptown Manhattan bar a few days before September 11, 2001.

This event is presented in conjunction with Poets House.

Rushdie, Auster, Atwood, Magris and Muñoz Molina Don Quixote at 400: A Tribute PEN World Voices: The New York Festival of International Literature

Saturday, April 16, 2005, 7:30 p.m.

Margaret Atwood, Paul Auster, Assia Djebar, Claudio Magris, Norman Manea, Antonio Muñoz Molina, Laura Restrepo and introduced by Salman Rushdie.

An international and illustrious group of today's literary giants celebrate the 400th anniversary of the Cervantes masterpiece Don Quixote.

First published in 1605, Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra's novel about a man under the spell of fiction has been casting its own spell on readers everywhere for four centuries. The story of Don Quixote has become a kind of natural resource, not only for writers but also for filmmakers, musicians, and artists of all kinds. In this celebration of the first modern novel, internationally renowned writers talk about its continuing global impact, and film clips and musical interludes present some of its many metamorphoses. Ravel's Songs from Don Quixote to Dulcinea will be performed by Chris Pedro Trakas, who will be accompanied on the piano by John Musto. In addition, Javier Camara, who played the nurse in Pedro Almodovar's Talk To Her, will read from the Quixote, in Spanish. Expect these and a host of other great moments at this once-in-a-lifetime tribute.

This event is presented in conjunction with the PEN American Center.

Confronting the Worst: Writing and Catastrophe PEN World Voices: The New York Festival of International Literature

Saturday, April 16, 2005, 4 p.m.

Svetlana Alexievich, François Bizot, Carolin Emcke, Philip Gourevitch, Ryszard Kapuscinski, Elena Poniatowska; moderated by Susie Linfield

Some of the great writers of the late twentieth century (and the early twenty-first) have documented extremities of human suffering, including war, torture, genocide, and famine. What is the writer's role as documentarian, scourge to conscience and action, and moral witness? How has that role been affected by changing technologies, particularly photo- and video-journalism and the Internet? A diverse group of writers who have made distinguished contributions to this literature share reflections on writing about and on trying to grasp some of the most extreme horrors of recent history.

This event is presented in conjunction with the PEN American Center.

Paul Auster and Chico Buarque PEN World Voices: The New York Festival of International Literature

Saturday, April 16, 2005, 2 p.m.

World renowned singer and composer, CHICO BUARQUE, who defined much of Brazilian culture for the past four decades, comes to the New York Public Library to be interviewed by the American writer PAUL AUSTER. This event is the kick-off for the PEN World Voices: The New York Festival of International Literature. This event is co-sponsored by LIVE from the NYPL.

About Paul Auster:

Paul Auster is the author of novels, screenplays, essays, and books of poetry. His most recent novel is Oracle Night. His books The Book of Illusions and Timbuktu were national best-sellers, as was I Thought My Father Was God, the NPR National Story Project anthology, which he edited. He lives in Brooklyn, New York.

About Chico Buarque:

Francisco Buarque de Hollanda was born in Rio de Janeiro. Both a singer and composer, he has written the plays Roda viva, Calabar, Gota d’água, and Ópera do malandro, and the novella Fazenda modelo. He was exiled briefly in Italy during the period of political repression in the late 1960s. His novels Turbulence and Benjamim were translated into English, German, Danish, Spanish, Catalan, Dutch, French, and Italian. His 2004 novel Budapest explores love, lust and reinvention. He lives in Rio de Janeiro.

Come to Crumbland R. Crumb & Robert Hughes: A Conversation

Thursday, April 14, 2005, 7 p.m.

Robert Crumb's longstanding and eye-catching career in the graphic arts is celebrated as the bad boy cartoonist makes his only scheduled U.S. appearance at The New York Public Library. The creator of Fritz the Cat, Zap Comix, and Mr. Natural discusses how he went from underground, X-rated artist to cultural icon. Robert Hughes, famous both as an art critic for Time magazine and as author of The Shock of the New and The Epic History of Art in America, will probe the famous, and very private, artist. This event will launch his new book from MQ Publications, The R. Crumb Handbook.

WHO OWNS CULTURE? LIVE from the NYPL and Wired magazine present: Jeff Tweedy + Lawrence Lessig in conversation with Steven Johnson

Thursday, April 7, 2005, 7 p.m.

Wilco guitarist and frontman Jeff Tweedy and Stanford Law School professor Lawrence Lessig explore the artistic, commercial and legal issues that surround the Internet-enabled freeing of culture. Lessig is the author of Free Culture: How Big Media Uses Technology and the Law to Lock Down Culture and Control Creativity. Steven Johnson, Wired contributing editor and author of the forthcoming Everything Bad Is Good For You: How Today's Popular Culture Is Actually Making Us Smarter, will moderate the discussion.

Bernard-Henri Lévy & David Brooks: A Conversation "A Frenchman in America: In the Footsteps of Alexis de Tocqueville"

Wednesday, April 6, 2005, 7 p.m.

How in the world does America look to foreign eyes? Over the past year, preeminent French philosopher and writer Bernard-Henri Lévy has been travelling through America, visiting its prisons and mega-churches, its high-rises and military facilities, its brothels and malls. Starting in May, 2005, and for much of this year, The Atlantic Monthly will record his myriad observations, establishing a cultural map of America at the dawn of the twenty-first century. In early 2006, Random House will publish the entire series as a book featuring previously unpublished chapters.

On April 6, New York Times Op-Ed columnist David Brooks will ask Bernard-Henri Lévy to report on what struck, irked, and puzzled him in America. Lévy's shrewd observations represent a modern-day version of Alexis de Tocqueville's "Democracy in America."

Influenced by Kerouac's "road literature," Bernard-Henri Lévy's 15,000-mile journey takes him to cities big and small; political rallies on the east coast; presidential debates in Arizona; quail hunting in Alabama; a NASCAR race; an Indian reservation; a strip bar in Vegas; the Mayo Clinic; the Mall of America; and a series of interviews with Richard Pearl, Rick Santorum, Hillary Clinton, Barrack Obama, Eliot Sptizer, Samuel Huntington, George Soros, Sharon Stone, Pearl Jam, Woody Allen and many more.

Bernard-Henri Lévy is France's leading philosopher. He is the author of thirty books, including Barbarism with a Human Face; War, Evil and the End of History and Who Killed Daniel Pearl? Lévy has also served on diplomatic missions for the French government, most recently heading a fact-finding mission to Afghanistan in the wake of the war against the Taliban.

David Brooks is an Op-Ed Columnist for The New York Times. He is also the author of Bobos in Paradise: The New Upper Class and How They Got There and On Paradise Drive: How We live Now (And Always Have) in the Future Tense.

Sarah Vowell

Wednesday, March 30, 2005, 6 p.m.

Author, social observer, and contributor to NPR's ?This American Life,? Sarah Vowell talks to the NYPL audience. Described as a Madonna of Americana by the LA Times, Vowell is a brilliant critic and storyteller. She also voiced the character of Violet Parr for the recent smash hit film The Incredibles.

Silence, Exile and Cunning: What's So Irish About That Anyway?

Tuesday, March 15, 2005, 6 p.m.

Two nights before New York City celebrates St. Patrick's Day, three internationally renowned Irish writers? Frank McCourt (Angela's Ashes, 'Tis); Nuala O'Faolain (Are You Somebody?, My Dream of You); and Colum McCann (Dancer, Songdogs) will discuss their work and the complexity of modern Irish identity in the context of James Joyce's famous line about silence, exile, and cunning. This discussion will be moderated by Paul Holdengräber, Director of LIVE from the NYPL. Tickets on sale Wednesday, February 23 at 10am.

This event is co-sponsored by the Dorothy and Lewis B. Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers.

Special live musical performance by Susan McKeown.

WHY WE FIGHT: HIV and AIDS in New York City Neighborhoods - Call for Artists, Writers, and Activists

Opportunity to study and collaborate with artist, writer, and activist Avram Finkelstein.

In conjunction with the WHY WE FIGHT: Remembering AIDS Activism exhibition, The New York Public Library will be hosting a project to create site-specific installations in four library branches—across the Bronx, Manhattan, and Staten Island—that explore the ways that HIV and AIDS are currently affecting these local New York City communities. The Library is putting out a call 

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24 Frames per Second

24 Frames per Second

Everything and anything to do with with film and film programs at the New York Public Library.

Across A Crowded Room
Africa and the African Diaspora

Africa and the African Diaspora

The history and culture of Africans and African descendants around the world.

Archives

Archives: Out of the Box

This blog channel explores the library’s world-class and ever-growing archival holdings. We’ll examine these unique materials and the works produced by researchers consulting them. Open the box and delve into the archives with us!

Barrier-Free Library

Barrier-Free Library

The New York Public Library strives for total accessibility, no matter what our differences may be. Join us as we move down the path toward that goal.

Blog en Español

Blog en Español

Blog en Español incluye una serie selectiva de listas de libros nuevos en español de ficción y no ficción (Novedades), y otras listas conmemorativas y festivas de obras que pueden estar disponibles en diferentes formatos de audio, video y electrónico, además de información sobre programas y servicios ofrecidos en la Biblioteca Pública de Nueva York.

Community Information

Community Information

Resources and services for residents of the Bronx, Manhattan and Staten Island. Can't find what you need? Also try the Community Information Search in NYPL's Best of the Web.

eReading Room

eReading Room: The future of books at NYPL

There are so many new ways to access books and other digital reading matter on personal computers and portable devices. How to keep up? Library staff offer tips and tricks to get the most out of free ebooks online and our own eNYPL services, and share occasional thoughts on the future of reading.

Facing the Page

Facing the Page: Adult Learning Centers

Exploring adult literacy at the library. The voices and experiences of students and volunteer tutors at our Adult Learning Centers.

Food for Thought

Food for Thought

Uncovering the edible NYPL in books, menus, and ephemera.

For Teachers

For Teachers

This blog highlights the opportunities and resources for teachers that are available throughout the the NYPL system. Learn more about our primary sources, professional development opportunities and student learning experiences. Let NYPL help you reach your teaching and learning goals!

Freedom of Thought

Freedom of Thought

Reflections on the work of NYPL Correctional Services, promoting access to knowledge for incarcerated and formerly incarcerated people in our communities.

Hand-Made

Hand-Made

Are you interested in sewing and knitting, book arts and letterpress printing, traditional crafts and the new DIY, sewists of yesterday and today, vintage-inspired design, and all things handmade? Then join in the conversation at Hand-Made. We'll share information on unique items from the Library's collections as well as details on Library events that cater to the curious crafter in us all.

Inside NYPL

Inside NYPL

Dig deeper into NYPL and learn about new programs, projects, and services for patrons of all ages.

Je vois la vie en blogue… @vec NYPL

Je vois la vie en blogue… @vec NYPL

Bonjour francophones et francophiles new-yorkais! Bloguons en français avec la Bibliothèque publique de New York.

Bienvenus à ce nouvel espace dans le Web où toutes les personnes intéressées de célébrer les cultures francophones sont invitées à partager des idées et opinions sur différents sujets, soit en littérature, histoire, musique, événements, faits divers et plusieurs autres thèmes.

Job Search Central

Job Search Central: Looking for Work?

Let the Library guide your search for employment with everything from resume help to databases to classes.

LGBT@NYPL

LGBT@NYPL

Connecting you with the LGBT collections, programs, and expertise that The New York Public Library has to offer.

Lifelong Learning

Lifelong Learning

Part of NYPL's Mission is to inspire lifelong learning. No matter your age, where you are in life or what new thing you are trying to learn, you can follow this channel to get suggested resources as well as support and inspiration.

LIVE from the NYPL

LIVE from the NYPL

The before and afterlife of LIVE events. Learn about speakers, get background readings, interviews, clips and more. The conversation about the conversation.

Musical of the Month

Musical of the Month

Each month, a libretto of an important early American musical in a variety of electronic formats, plus associated photographs, vocal scores, and the occasional audio file.

My Library

My Library

Who I am.
Why I use the library.
...And what keeps me coming back.

Next Chapter

Next Chapter: A 50+ Library Blog

Don't despair if you are a Boomer, or a Silent, or a Greatest — the public library is with you every step of the way! This channel covers services, programs and other items of interest for the active older adult.

NYC Neighborhoods

NYC Neighborhoods

Five boroughs, 300 square miles, 6,375 miles of streets, 8.3 million people... hundreds of neighborhoods.

This channel covers the history, culture, people, hustle and bustle and goings-on of New York City.

NYPL Labs

NYPL Labs

NYPL Labs is an experimental technology unit that works closely with curators to create tools that expand the range of interaction, interpretation and reuse of research library collections and data. Learn more

Paperless Research

Paperless Research

The New York Public Library subscribes to hundreds of online databases and other information tools. Some are available onsite while others can be accessed at home using your library card number. This blog channel offers tips and tricks on getting the most out of online resources.

Periodically Speaking

Periodically Speaking

A reading series providing a major venue for emerging writers to present their work while emphasizing the diversity of America’s literary magazines and the magazine collections of The New York Public Library. Each event presents writers from three influential literary magazines—one poet, one fiction writer, one nonfiction writer—introduced by their editors. This blog provides coverage and context around Periodically Speaking events.

Poetry Month

Poetry Month

Each April, librarians throughout NYPL post readings, discussions and events celebrating National Poetry Month, a time when publishers, booksellers, literary organizations, libraries, schools and poets around the country band together to celebrate poetry and its vital place in American culture.

Popular Music

Popular Music

Libraries are thought of as quiet places, but that doesn't mean the NYPL doesn't know how to rock out. This channel will highlight popular music found in the library's collections.

Preservation

Preservation

News about the Library's preservation efforts and information for those interested in preserving their own collections. About the Barbara Goldsmith Preservation Division.

Reader’s Den

Reader’s Den

The Reader’s Den is an online book discussion group offering library readers with busy lifestyles a convenient way to connect with books and The New York Public Library.  This virtual discussion is accessible 24/7 and gives readers an opportunity to spark insightful discussions with the surrounding community by reading at his or her own pace.

The NYPL Broadcast

The NYPL Broadcast

The NYPL Broadcast serves up the latest in audio and video recordings made at The New York Public Library, everything from short profiles of our staff and collections, to full-length recordings of our LIVE from the NYPL, KidsLive and TeenLIVE programs.

The Ticketless Traveler

The Ticketless Traveler

Travel the world without leaving your chair with these book, film and music recommendations.

Three Faiths

Three Faiths

Librarians, curators, programmers, educators, and users share their thoughts on faith, and discuss the Library's Three Faiths exhibition. Check here regularly from October to February 2011 for: behind-the-scenes glimpses at the making of the exhibition; art, literature, and music at the intersection of Judiasm, Christianity, and Islam; lively discussions about the similarities and differences among these three religions... And more!

Vandamm

Vandamm

This blog channel is inspired by the exhibition at the Library for the Performing Arts, Poet of Light: Florence Vandamm & the Vandamm Studio, which is on view from September 2013 through February 2014. The exhibition samples the photographs, key sheets and negatives are becoming available on the Digital Gallery.

Women's History Month

Women's History Month

In honor of Women's History Month, each March, NYPL librarians present a monthlong series of posts highlighting the many amazing women they've discovered through the print and online resources of The New York Public Library.

All Possible Worlds

All Possible Worlds: Conversations on Voltaire's 'Candide'

Based in the recently closed exhibition Candide at 250: Scandal and Success, this blog traces the vectors Voltaire's book has taken through the popular and scholarly imagination. Posts frequently reference passages and commentaries in an experimental online edition, Candide 2.0. Learn more...

Design by the Book

Design by the Book

Mining the Library's collections for art and craft inspiration.

Duke Jazz Series

Duke Jazz Series

Coverage and context on The Duke Jazz Series and Talks at the Library for the Performing Arts.

Haiti

Haiti

NYPL resources on the history, culture and geography of Haiti, and information on rebuilding and relief efforts in the aftermath of the January, 2010 earthquake.

The Great American Revue

The Great American Revue

Revues and other topical popular entertainment of the early 20th century.